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It is mine but it ain't moving, yet! Seized Engine

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  • It is mine but it ain't moving, yet! Seized Engine

    I am the proud and near original owner of a 1960 Studebaker Hawk. My mother purchased this car new my senior year in high school.

    It has been in the family for all these many years and I had it stored for my 20 years of active duty with the Marines. When I retired I collected it from my uncle and his location in Nevada. It was in pretty good condition and I got it running for my son to drive to high school.
    I am not much of a mechanic but have tons of tools and a friend who likes to turn wrenches.

    When notified of my 50th reunion (yes, a year early) I thought it time to start the restoration project on the Hawk. It hasn't been started in 17 years but was stored in the garage. I pulled the spark plugs and squirted in oil in the plug holes. Tried to turn it over by rocking it. Pulled the starter and tried to move the flywheel a little. Pulled the head and am soaking the cylinders but still no movement. Pulled the oil pan and now what????

    I would appreciate any suggestions for next steps.

  • #2
    Is there any noticeable rust in the cylinders? Did you use a large screwdriver against the flywheel teeth?

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    • #3
      V8 or 6cyl? You said you pulled the head (singular)...
      Automatic or 3sp/OD?
      Check inside the bell housing for mouse nests/ other intruders

      I was able to turn a stuck engine over by using 175 PSI from my air compressor into the spark-plug holes (just kept moving from one to the other). At least it will force the oil around the rings.




      Ray


      Specializing in Studebaker Restoration
      Ray

      www.raylinrestoration.com
      Specializing in Studebaker Restoration

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      • #4
        My buddy Roger (the primary wrench turner) used a small pry bar with a flat lip about twice the size of a large screw driver but couldn't get any leverage on it. Was this a good or bad idea?

        There is no noticeable rust along the sleeves or on the top of the cyclinders.

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        • #5
          In reply to Studeman. It is a 3 speed on column with overdrive. I did pull both heads. Good idea about the air compressor. Thanks Ray.

          I have had evidence of a rodent so will look in the bell housing--Whatever and where ever that is? I do have both the reprint of the parts manual and chassie manual.

          We also attempted to pull it while in gear but one of the rear tires just skidded on the gravel of the driveway. We pulled it in 1st gear and also in reverse, no luck.

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          • #6
            Sorry Studeman, I forgot to say it was a V8, original engine 289 with 141,000 on it at least I suspect it turned past the 100,000 mark. It was driven from 1960 to about 1973 as my mother's primary vehicle.

            I am new to the club and this formum. This posting is a little different. I can't quite figure how to post after each post but am sure I will learn.

            I appreciate the quick responses.

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            • #7
              This might be the answer to my question above! I will try it and see. Learn my making mistakes is my motto.

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              • #8
                I feel your pain!

                [img][/img]

                John Clary
                Greer, SC

                Life... is what happens as you are making plans.
                SDC member since 1975
                John Clary
                Greer, SC

                SDC member since 1975

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                • #9
                  Yes, John but from the looks of other photos you have talent to remove your pain! All I have is the desire and my original Hawk. I even have the old sales receipt and paper work where she purchased this one in Emmett, Idaho. If I knew it was a keeper I guess I wouldn't have been such a reckless driver. I wrecked it twice! Oh those dents and bent chrome aren't going to be any fun...more pain.

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                  • #10
                    Hey jc, better get over there on the passenger side and make sure that chain is lined up straight when Yas pulls on'er

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                    • #11
                      Drain the oil and fill it up to the top with diesel and let it set for a while it will come loose and a lot of crud will also.

                      7G-Q1 49 2R12 10G-F5 56B-D4 56B-F2
                      http://ozarktrails.tripod.com/

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                      • #12
                        quote:Originally posted by buddymander

                        Hey jc, better get over there on the passenger side and make sure that chain is lined up straight when Yas pulls on'er
                        That picture was taken a few days ago. I have poured in more marvel mystery oil, stuck the plugs back in, and am letting it soak some more. I even removed the generator, water manifold assembly, damper, and installed a four foot piece of angle iron on the end of the crank (like Gord did on one of his this past summer) and it still wouldn't budge. For now...I will let it soak in oil until I lift the cab and slide the frame with the engine from underneath.

                        John Clary
                        Greer, SC

                        Life... is what happens as you are making plans.
                        SDC member since 1975
                        John Clary
                        Greer, SC

                        SDC member since 1975

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                        • #13
                          .......don't waste your time with all these loosening tactics...tear the thing down and you might get lucky...I doubt it tho,with that many miles...We've seen what a few years of setting will do to the inside of a engine......(see pics a few weeks back)..I know there are heroic stories of engines that were loosened up with all kinds of "magic"...but these cars were either sold with the best of intentions (?), or later, with any kind of service requirement, later rebuilt or left to sit....I ask out there (hear the echo...?): Has anyone ever freed up a stuck engine with over 100K miles on it and put that engine into service with any kind of luck ?

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                          • #14
                            There is also the old diet Coke trick. As a last resort put diet Coke (NOT regular, sugar and engines don't go together!) in the cylinders and let it soak overnight.

                            The acid in the Coke will attack the rust and corrosion and may free things up enough to let the engine turn over.

                            Jeff DeWitt
                            http://carolinastudes.net
                            Jeff DeWitt
                            http://carolinastudes.net

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                            • #15
                              Is it possible the clutch is stuck -making it extremely difficult to turn over by hand?

                              http://community.webshots.com/user/s...host=community

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