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flight o matic operation

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  • StudeRich
    replied
    As Jim said that is perfectly NORMAL, so when downshifting to Second (Low Range) just shift back up to drive at 38 MPH and avoid it or serious "U" Joint, Differential or Trans. damage WILL occur! [:0]

    StudeRich

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  • jimmijim8
    replied
    The nature of the beast. jimmijim

    Stude Junkie+++++++Do it right the f$$$$ Time. Never mind. Just do it right. When youre done your done. You'll know it.

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  • buddymander
    replied
    Could this possibly be caused by a throttle valve adjusted to the point of being too sensitive?

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  • Rerun
    replied
    Larry,

    The L-D-L quick shift will hold the transmission in second on acceleration. However, this doesn't work when decelerating. The downshift that you describe can be a bit violent. I would be more concerned about drive train stress than over-reving the engine. But, this is the way that the FOM is designed to work. I don't know of any way to defeat this function short of changing over to a Powershift which will manually hold in second.

    Jim Bradley
    Lewistown PA
    '78 Avanti II

    Leave a comment:


  • SuperHawk
    started a topic flight o matic operation

    flight o matic operation

    When going down long, mountain roads, at speeds of 40 to 55 mph, I like to put the flight o matic trans selector into L position to get it into second gear, thus saving the brakes from fading to the point they disappear. Car is '64 Stude V8's with the 6 cylinder valve body added for first gear start.

    But, when the car gets to about 35 or maybe 30 MPH, give or take, it shifts itself into first. Then, I feel I'm guilty of over-reving the poor thing. I'd like it to stay in second a while longer. Is there a way to manually control this, without messing with the trans pressure adjustment linkage?

    Seems I remember seeing somewhere in print that if you shift from L to D to L in a fairly rapid manner that might "lock" the thing into second. Anyone know anything about this concept?

    Thanks,
    Larry
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