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Aluminum Pan Filler Block

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  • Aluminum Pan Filler Block

    I am trying to find some of the leaks in my full flow 289 (kinda feel like the kid who tried to put his finger in the dike),and noticed two of the bolts on the timing gear cover, where they go into the aluminum pan filler block are stripped. My question is do these holes go all the way thru to the pan, or are they blocked off? It has been quite a few years since I had one of these apart.

  • #2
    No they are blind holes, don't go all the way through.
    Frank van Doorn
    Omaha, Ne.
    1962 GT Hawk 289 4 speed
    1941 Champion streetrod, R-2 Powered, GM 200-4R trans.
    1952 V-8 232 Commander State "Starliner" hardtop OD

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    • #3
      Like Frank said, they are blind holes. I've disassembled Stude engines that someone put in too long of bolts. This punches through the blind holes.[V]

      Gordon

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      • #4
        Welcome to my world Chuck. Helicoil is the fix, I have the coils to fix it, now I have to get to work on it.

        Pat Skelly
        '62 GT Hawk
        '56 Sky Hawk
        '37 Dictator Coupe

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        • #5
          if you remove the filler block to helicoil it it's worth the time to check it for flatness, if it's ever been overtorqued it's probably not flat anymore, hammer between the bolt holes from behind until it is close and then finish with wet/dry paper laid on a piece of glass. chamfer the bolt holes too and use some permatex when you reassemble.

          nate

          --
          55 Commander Starlight
          http://members.cox.net/njnagel
          --
          55 Commander Starlight
          http://members.cox.net/njnagel

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          • #6
            Even tho they are blind holes, looseness will allow leaks past the filler block.

            Another option is to remove the block and drill those holes all the way through. Re-tap the holes, then create your own "studs" by threading in bolts of sufficient length from the rear. JB Weld the bolt heads, and attach the timing cover with nuts from the front. Thats the last time you will have to make that repair.

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            • #7
              In addition to making sure the filler block is flat, then instead of using helicoils to repair the threads I like to drill and tap to the next size.You'll need to also drill the timing cover to allow for the larger bolts. Upon reinstall don't over torque the bolts.
              Russ
              quote:Originally posted by N8N

              if you remove the filler block to helicoil it it's worth the time to check it for flatness, if it's ever been overtorqued it's probably not flat anymore, hammer between the bolt holes from behind until it is close and then finish with wet/dry paper laid on a piece of glass. chamfer the bolt holes too and use some permatex when you reassemble.

              nate

              --
              55 Commander Starlight
              http://members.cox.net/njnagel

              Russ Shop Foreman "Rusty Nut Garage"
              53 2R6 289 5SpdOD (driver)
              57 SH (project)
              60 Lark VIII 2dr sd (driver)

              Russ Shop Foreman \"Rusty Nut Garage\"
              53 2R6 289 5SpdOD (driver)
              57 SH (project)
              60 Lark VIII 2dr sd (driver)

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              • #8
                Great info. Thanks

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