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Freed a stuck 259

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  • #16
    Well, this darn thing is taking on a life of its own. Too bad the name, "Frankenstude" is already taken.

    I determined that the battery tray would be seriously in the way of the pedals if I left it on the left side, so I switched it to the right. Then I dug out a crusty long-tail T86 with OD that had come on another parts engine I bought. The front bearing retainer was broken. Spent a bunch of time tracking that piece down. Then I figured I'd better pack the throwout bearing. More time. Finally got the transmission installed. Then I went looking for a driveshaft. Came up dry looking in all the usual places. I didn't want to rob one out of a running car, either. Finally I looked in the trunk of the '65 Commander 2-door that's going to get the 4.3 engine. Bingo! It's a skinny 6 cylinder driveshaft, but it'll do. And that car will need a custom shaft, anyway, when the time comes.

    So the engine is now coupled up to the rear end. Now I need a clutch pedal, and a means of shifting gears. Simplest solution was to round up the steering column jacket and pedal hanger from the dead '61, and put 'em back in there. I wasted a LOT of time looking for the upper half of the "saddle" that clamps the pedal hanger to the steering column jacket, and finally gave up and bent one up out of steel strip. I DID find the linkage rods for the gearshift and clutch, though, and got them installed, and both clutch and shift do work. I'm now at the point, that if it had a seat and a gas pedal, it could be driven, but the steering column really needs to be braced. And it needs at least enough floor to support the gas pedal (and my feet).

    Having got this far, I'm going to dive in and do it at least halfway right. I will brace the steering column, but make sure that the portion of the brace that passes over the bellhousing is hinged at one end, and can be unbolted at the other (wing nuts?), so that it doesn't become an impediment to hoisting the engine and transmission straight up vertically to remove them. Then I can attach an instrument panel of sorts to the swinging portion of the brace, and arrange for all the wiring to pass by the hinge end, leaving a loop for slack. I can mount the starter solenoid, ignition resistor, ignition switch, and ammeter there, and possibly also a toggle switch to operate the overdrive solenoid. I really don't plan on driving this thing in overdrive, but it would be nice to be able to at least test if the OD functions, and hear if the planet gears are noisy or not.

    I haven't really given much thought to the seat issue yet, but I have a bench seat out of a Toyota truck that is nice and light. Not much advantage to using a Studebaker seat, as there is no floor pan with bolt holes to fit it, so whatever seat gets used will call for building some kind of support structure. I may want to arrange the seat so that it can be hinged back, again to facilitate swapping engine/transmission combos.

    Anyhow, I'm done with it for today.

    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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    • #17
      quote:Originally posted by gordr

      Well, this darn thing is taking on a life of its own. Too bad the name, "Frankenstude" is already taken.

      I determined that the battery tray would be seriously in the way of the pedals if I left it on the left side, so I switched it to the right. Then I dug out a crusty long-tail T86 with OD that had come on another parts engine I bought. The front bearing retainer was broken. Spent a bunch of time tracking that piece down. Then I figured I'd better pack the throwout bearing. More time. Finally got the transmission installed. Then I went looking for a driveshaft. Came up dry looking in all the usual places. I didn't want to rob one out of a running car, either. Finally I looked in the trunk of the '65 Commander 2-door that's going to get the 4.3 engine. Bingo! It's a skinny 6 cylinder driveshaft, but it'll do. And that car will need a custom shaft, anyway, when the time comes.

      So the engine is now coupled up to the rear end. Now I need a clutch pedal, and a means of shifting gears. Simplest solution was to round up the steering column jacket and pedal hanger from the dead '61, and put 'em back in there. I wasted a LOT of time looking for the upper half of the "saddle" that clamps the pedal hanger to the steering column jacket, and finally gave up and bent one up out of steel strip. I DID find the linkage rods for the gearshift and clutch, though, and got them installed, and both clutch and shift do work. I'm now at the point, that if it had a seat and a gas pedal, it could be driven, but the steering column really needs to be braced. And it needs at least enough floor to support the gas pedal (and my feet).

      Having got this far, I'm going to dive in and do it at least halfway right. I will brace the steering column, but make sure that the portion of the brace that passes over the bellhousing is hinged at one end, and can be unbolted at the other (wing nuts?), so that it doesn't become an impediment to hoisting the engine and transmission straight up vertically to remove them. Then I can attach an instrument panel of sorts to the swinging portion of the brace, and arrange for all the wiring to pass by the hinge end, leaving a loop for slack. I can mount the starter solenoid, ignition resistor, ignition switch, and ammeter there, and possibly also a toggle switch to operate the overdrive solenoid. I really don't plan on driving this thing in overdrive, but it would be nice to be able to at least test if the OD functions, and hear if the planet gears are noisy or not.

      I haven't really given much thought to the seat issue yet, but I have a bench seat out of a Toyota truck that is nice and light. Not much advantage to using a Studebaker seat, as there is no floor pan with bolt holes to fit it, so whatever seat gets used will call for building some kind of support structure. I may want to arrange the seat so that it can be hinged back, again to facilitate swapping engine/transmission combos.

      Anyhow, I'm done with it for today.

      Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
      The only thing that comes to mind is...

      Yabba Dabba Dooo!

      Dick Steinkamp
      Bellingham, WA

      Dick Steinkamp
      Bellingham, WA

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      • #18
        Well, I had a ride on it today, one orbit around the yard. I don't think you can ride "in" something that has no body, can you? My main chore today was replacing the filter sock in the fuel tank of my '96 Suburban, then replacing the tank, but I got some quality time on the Studebuggy while waiting for the tank to get filled by my little pump.

        I started by taking off the leaking water pump, and replacing it with a seemingly good used one I found in the barn. No leaks so far. Then I cast around for a sheet of metal to make a section of "floor" to support the driver's heels and gas pedal, and found the base plate off an old home stereo in the scrap metal bin. Bent up one edge to stiffen it, and welded it to the frame. Then welded a couple of 1/4-20 nuts to it to capture the hinge pin of the gas pedal. This is the original gas pedal off the '61 Lark, but the part of the hinge that mounts to the floor was completely rusted away. So I worked with what was left.

        I measured up the Toyota seat I had, and it was 46" across between the mounting holes, and kind of low, too. So I built up a sort of a cribbing from 2X6s to support it. No nails! I laid a piece of 2X6 along each frame rail, and drilled down through it and the frame rail with a 3/8" bit at each end, and bolted it to the frame rail with a piece of 3/8" Redi-Rod and big washers. Then I laid a pair of 4-foot 2X6s across the frame on top of them and set the seat down and tried it. Too low, and had to come forward. I moved it forward, and stuck two shorter pieces of 2X6 on top of the bolted-down ones to shim the seat up. That proved to be near-perfect, so I marked the holes for the ends of the seat tracks, then used more Redi_Rod to join the 3-layer stacks of 2X6 together at each corner. I also drilled holes for the rear of the seat tracks, and bolted them to the top 2X6 with 3/8" bolts, again with large washers. I haven't dealt with the front of the seat tracks yet; they will need some little metal angle brackets. But what's done is plenty strong.

        Then I set a battery in the tray, and fired the engine, after adding some antifreeze to the radiator. Once it had warmed up a little, I stepped on the clutch pedal, and shifted into reverse. Woo-Hoo! I backed up OK. Clutch works fine, even if the pedal support is still ill-anchored. Then I shifted into first gear, and drove ahead, and made a slow orbit of the yard; total distance maybe 900 feet. That carb will definitely need some work, because I could not get it to rev up without dying, but I made the circuit without stalling the engine. No brakes as yet. I plan to mount the original master cylinder, and use those bolts to add sway braces to the pedal cluster.

        Anyway, the engine got partially warmed up and circulated the antifreeze, with no leaks to be seen. Should be safe from frost at least until the REAL cold weather arrives.

        Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
        Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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        • #19
          When I was embarrassing my wife and daughter by driving around the yard on this one...they nick named me "Freddy Flintstone." I was getting the chassis and engine the way I wanted it before dropping the body back on. The old wooden ammo box made a fair seat but you had to take care not to lean back. Note the temporary "non-stock" gas tank.
          [img][/img]

          John Clary
          Greer, SC

          Life... is what happens as you are making plans.
          SDC member since 1975
          John Clary
          Greer, SC

          SDC member since 1975

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          • #20
            Gord

            Sounds like you are having a ball with the studebuggy. Just be careful not to get the floor mat wedged into the accelerator, you know the problems that can cause with no brakes.

            Bob

            ,

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            • #21
              Gordon, thanks for your step by step on the 259. It will be handy when I start on the 259 I rescued from a wrecked 64 Daytona from near Digby. I did remove the pan and clean it of all the solids inside. Over all the inside of the engine looks pretty good.
              Thanks again.
              Andrew

              Andrew
              '49 2R5
              '59 Lark 2 door waggon
              '48 Chev 1 ton

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