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  • E3 Spark Plugs

    Has any one tried these E3 plugs in a Studebaker R1 or R2?

    http://www.e3sparkplugs.com/

    Cross reference for Champion J-12Y is an E3 plug is E3.52

    <div align="left">John</div id="left">

    <div align="left">'63 Avanti, R1, Auto, AC, PW (unrestored)</div id="left">
    sigpic
    John
    63R-2386
    Resto-Mod by Michael Myer

  • #2
    I've found that using any other than a standard spark plug designed for a [u]stock</u> ignition system is wasted money. As long as the heat range is appropriate for the application, the brand means little.

    If the manufacturer specifies an exotic spark plug then that's what you buy. You won't see much if any difference in performance in a points ignition beyond lightening your wallet.




    Poet...Mystic...Soldier of Fortune. As always...self-absorbed, adversarial, cocky and in general a malcontent.
    Poet...Mystic...Soldier of Fortune. As always...self-absorbed, adversarial, cocky and in general a malcontent.

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    • #3
      In my experience, the only engine to actually benefit from multi-electrode spark plugs is the ****el engine in the Mazda rotary cars, which have them as factory-issue.

      I could see these as fouling readily, if the engine burns any oil at all. I looked at the Web site, and my Spidey sense says "Snake Oil." YMMV

      FWIW, multi-electrode spark plugs like these have been offered for sale for at least 60 years, often under exotic names like "Flame Thrower" or "Fire Injector", and none of them work any better than stock spark plugs, and most of them cannot be regapped easily when they become worn.

      Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
      Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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      • #4
        The idea of multi electrode plugs comes from use in aircraft engines. Most of the piston aircraft engines use multi electrode plugs for longevity, not higher performance as the cost of standard massive electrode aircraft plugs are in excess of 20 bucks each and if a fine wire platinum or iridium plug is used, they can cost around 75 bucks each. Each cylinder of an aircraft engine uses 2 plugs with 2 seperate magnetos for safety and better engine operation, so the cost of spark plugs can get pricey really fast. Installing platinum plugs in a good running Stude engine will result in longer plug life with a little less voltage needed to fire the plug. Bud

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        • #5
          Snake oil...

          Exactly what gordr and Bud said.

          Even with hi. perf. or racing ignitions...waste of money.

          Mike

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          • #6
            OK then what's the best standard type plug to run? Is the Champion J-12Y (What my Stude Parts Manual specifies) even available any more?

            <div align="left">John</div id="left">

            <div align="left">'63 Avanti, R1, Auto, AC, PW (unrestored)</div id="left">
            sigpic
            John
            63R-2386
            Resto-Mod by Michael Myer

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            • #7
              John, J-12YC plugs is what I use im my R-2,readily available at most FLAPS. Bought mine at O'Reillys.
              Frank van Doorn
              Omaha, Ne.
              1962 GT Hawk 289 4 speed
              1941 Champion streetrod, R-2 Powered, GM 200-4R trans.
              1952 V-8 232 Commander State "Starliner" hardtop OD

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              • #8
                The technology behind their plug design will no doubt result in a very minimal improvement. And if you were a drag racer, it is possible it could effect your ET by the smallest of margins. However, indexing a standard J-12Y, which is done by shimming the spark plug to get the electrode to face in the most optimum way for combustion will yield the same result.

                I wouldn't call it snake oil, as snake oil actually has much more basis for health benefits than the pharma companies would like us to believe. Rather, I would call it good marketing.

                ========================
                63 Avanti R2, 4-Speed, 3.73 TT
                Martinez, CA

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                • #9
                  I tried an experiment several years ago with a Chrysler 440 engine. I installed four new Champion RJ12YC plugs in one side and four new Splitfire plugs in the other side and hooked up the scope. The standard Champions took less voltage to fire than the new superduper Splitfires. The platinum or iridium tipped plugs require less voltage to fire and do last longer than the standard plugs which is why they're installed in most new cars. Bud

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                  • #10
                    I put them in my 02 Chevy, went from 14.5 to to less than 13 right away. Not sure why, no leadfoot or anything like that. The best I get is 13.5. I would give them a thumbs-down.

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