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OIL FILTER

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  • OIL FILTER

    DO the 1959/1960 8V Studebakers have an oil filter,optional or standard equipment? Does the model make a difference to my question?

  • #2
    quote:Originally posted by curt

    DO the 1959/1960 8V Studebakers have an oil filter,optional or standard equipment? Does the model make a difference to my question?
    All models had an optional partial flow filter system. No model had it as standard equipment (to my knowledge...and I even checked my 1960 "fleet" brochure).




    Dick Steinkamp
    Bellingham, WA
    Dick Steinkamp
    Bellingham, WA

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    • #3
      I was going to put a partial flow filter on my rebuilt Champion motor, but decided not to, after learning something from Mark Frank, who has rebuilt many Stude motors. He told me that every motor he has torn down that had a partial flow filter on it, needed grinding on the crankshaft, due to inadequate lubrication. But all the ones he has torn down that never had a partial flow filter needed no grinding of the crankshafts. He believes this is because the partial flow filter robs approx. 5 psi of oil pressure that otherwise would lubricated the crankshaft bearings better.

      If you live in Texas or near there, Mark is the guy to do your engine work: http://www.studebakervendors.com/mds.htm

      [img=left]http://rocketdillo.com/studebaker/misc/images/Avacar-hcsdc.gif[/img=left]DilloCrafter

      1955 1/2 Ton Pickup
      The Red-Headed Amazon
      Deep in the heart of Texas

      Paul Simpson
      "DilloCrafter"

      1955 1/2 Ton Pickup
      The Red-Headed Amazon
      Deep in the heart of Texas

      Comment


      • #4
        In 1963 I bought a 55 Studebaker coupe that had sixty plus thousand miles on it. I drove that car two or three years of hard driving (towing race car, racing the car, and genaraly driving the way young guys did back then). The Stude had well over one hundred miles on it when I got rid of it (mistake) and the engine (259 V8) still ran good! THIS CAR NEVER HAD AN OIL FILTER ON IT!!! My 48 Champion doesn't have an oil filter on it and I will not put one on it!!! It was always my feeling that the most important filter on a car is the air filter!!!

        GARY H 2DR.SEDAN 48 STUDEBAKER CHAMPION NORTHEAST MD.

        Comment


        • #5
          Back in the day...check your owners manual...it was recommended you run heavy oil in the summer and light oil in the winter. Filters weren't needed if you were changing your fluids twice a year.

          Nowadays we're content to run a multi-visc year-round and change it every spring. The oils have changed but the engines in our Studes haven't.

          No, filters aren't needed, if you maintain an adequate maintenance schedule. That would be determined by how you drive, where you drive and when you drive. Even if you don't put miles on your garaged beauty the oil will break down over time. I change once a year minimum, even if the only trip that's made is to the garage to change the oil and lubricate the water pump and muffler bearing.

          Brad Johnson
          Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
          33 Rockne 10
          51 commander Starlight
          53 Commander Starlight

          previously: 63 Cruiser, 62 Regal VI, 60 VI convertible, 50 LandCruiser
          "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

          Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
          Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
          sigpic'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée"

          Comment


          • #6
            There was a thread on the forum several months ago where someone had computed the effiacy of a partial flow filter. It showed that all the oil was cleaned pretty regularly
            and the filters were worth having. One very important thing to know is that the filters REQUIRE a restricted feed line. This restriction, approximately a .05"hole in the oil line fitting, is necessary to maintain oil pressure to the journals. I doubt the Studebaker engineers would have recommended the cleaner if damage to the engine was likely. My guess is, over the years, the cars with problems had the feed line replaced without the restriction in the line. I have an oil filter on my 50 Starlight and..... a resticted oil line.

            1950 Champion Starlight
            1963 Hawk GT
            Santa Barbara
            CA
            The 1950 Champion Starlight
            Santa Barbara
            CA

            Comment


            • #7
              quote:Originally posted by starlightchamp
              This restriction, approximately a .05"hole in the oil line fitting, is necessary to maintain oil pressure to the journals. I doubt the Studebaker engineers would have recommended the cleaner if damage to the engine was likely. My guess is, over the years, the cars with problems had the feed line replaced without the restriction in the line.
              I'm just reporting what I was told by a machine shop owner who has taken apart many Studebaker engines. I assume he was referring to restricted oil lines, and that they would still take away a few pounds/square inch of pressure that could lubricate the bearings. But I don't remember if he was talking about rod bearings or main bearings. Either way, over many years and miles, I can see how the wear could occur. Maybe the engineers considered the slightly increased crankshaft wear to be a worthwhile trade-off if it meant the oil would be filtered. Of course, all this is just conjecture on my part.

              [img=left]http://rocketdillo.com/studebaker/misc/images/Avacar-hcsdc.gif[/img=left]DilloCrafter

              1955 1/2 Ton Pickup
              The Red-Headed Amazon
              Deep in the heart of Texas

              Paul Simpson
              "DilloCrafter"

              1955 1/2 Ton Pickup
              The Red-Headed Amazon
              Deep in the heart of Texas

              Comment


              • #8
                quote:Originally posted by rockne10

                Back in the day...check your owners manual...it was recommended you run heavy oil in the summer and light oil in the winter. Filters weren't needed if you were changing your fluids twice a year.
                Nowadays we're content to run a multi-visc year-round and change it every spring. The oils have changed but the engines in our Studes haven't.
                No, filters aren't needed, if you maintain an adequate maintenance schedule. That would be determined by how you drive, where you drive and when you drive. Even if you don't put miles on your garaged beauty the oil will break down over time. I change once a year minimum, even if the only trip that's made is to the garage to change the oil and lubricate the water pump and muffler bearing.
                My new '61 Cruiser did not have an oil filter and I didn't add one. In those days the recommendation was to change the oil and grease the chassis every 1,000 miles (which I did). In '64 they extended the lube interval to 6,000 miles if you used their special S-P grease. They also extended the warranty to 24 months or 24,000 miles (from the previous 12 month, 12,000 miles). To get the extended chassis lube interval they put plastic plugs where all the grease fittings previously were found. Dealers typically replaced all those plugs with regular zerks at the first opportunity.
                In late '62 and on, full-flow oil filters became standard equipment.
                My '64 Owner Protector Service booklet calls for changing the engine oil every two months or 6,000 miles (whichever comes first) in regular service, every 30 days in dusty or adverse driving conditions or sub-zero conditions. Interestingly it calls for changing oil filters at 6,000-mile intervals. Oil recommended in that booklet is 10W-30 or 20W above 32 degrees, 5W-20 or 10W between 0 and 32 and 5W-20 below 0.
                My '53 Owners Manual mentions Fram filters as an option and that the cartridge should typically be changed at 5,000-mile intervals. Oil changes and chassis lubes are recommended at 1,000-mile intervals. Oils recommended were 30 above 32 degrees, 20 for 10 degrees, 10W down to 10 degrees below zero and 5W below 10 below zero. Other recommended services- clean the crankcase at least once a year and clean the oil filler cap periodically by dui=ipping it in kersosene , drying thoroughly then dipping in clean engine oil (cleans air enterring the crankcase). The factory warranty in those days was 90 days or 4,000 miles, whichever occured first.

                [img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/R-4.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64L.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64P.jpg[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/53K.jpg[/img=right]Paul Johnson
                '53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
                '64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
                '64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
                Museum R-4 engine
                Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
                '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

                Comment


                • #9
                  Addendum to my previous post:
                  I dug out the owners manual from my deceased '64 Champ (8E). It has even different information re oil and changes. It calls for oil changes under favorable conditions every 4,000 miles or 60 days (which ever comes first) when the temperature is above 32 and every 30 days when the temperature is below 32, more frequently under "severe operation, dustbowl driving, and other unusual circumstances". "Consult your Studebaker dealer if you have a special operating condition." Change the filter every 4,000 miles or six months. A pint of STP was recommended at each oil change. Oils recommended were 30 with 20W-40 or 10W-30 as alternates with temperatures above 32. 10 above to 32- 20W or 10W 30. 10 below- 10W or 10W-30. Below 10 below- 5E or 5w-20. Chassis lube- 1,000 miles.
                  The 8E manual listed a 12-month, 12,000-mile warranty, but a 1964 supplement (loose leaf in the manual) extended the warranty to 24 months or 24,000 miles.



                  [img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/R-4.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64L.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64P.jpg[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/53K.jpg[/img=right]Paul Johnson
                  '53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
                  '64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
                  '64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
                  Museum R-4 engine
                  Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
                  '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    In those days, time was not a premium commodity; and neither was oil; and you could get rid of the used by spreading it on your driveway.[V]
                    "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

                    Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
                    Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                    sigpic'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      When I was a child, Tehema County Road Crews (CA) used to have big oil trucks (kind of like water trucks) that used to spread oil on the dirt and gravel roads. This was to keep the dust down. It worked pretty good too. I live off a dirt road now, and there is tremendously more dust now, then there used to be.


                      Lotsa Larks!
                      K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                      Ron Smith
                      Where the heck is Lewiston, CA?
                      Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
                      K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                      Ron Smith
                      Where the heck is Fawn Lodge, CA?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        In Missouri, spreading used oil on gravel roads worked pretty good until some guy spread dioxin tainted oil on the gravel city streets of Times Beach, a dinky town near St Louis. To make a long story short, Times Beach no longer exists and it's illegal to spread oil on roads now.

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