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Cause of Broken Stud on 2R10 Drag Link

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  • Cause of Broken Stud on 2R10 Drag Link

    I just experienced a somewhat frightening failure. While turning out of a parking stall at my local "Parts-R-Us" store, I heard a loud "bang" which was followed by the steering wheel spinning freely in my hands. The stud on the right end of the steering drag link (reach rod) had broken between the ball and the shank, dropping the right end of the drag link down onto the pavement. Fortunately this happened at 2 mph in a parking lot and not on the freeway which I had just come off of. Has anybody had this happen or heard of anything similar? What would be the cause? Is this a very unusual failure? Do I now need to worry about other parts of the steering linkage, such as the tie rod? Thank you for any information you may have. Best, Phil.

    Philip W Birkeland
    1950 Studebaker 2R10

  • #2
    Since you are soliciting opinions...I have had a Studebaker for over 35 years and been around for much longer. This is the first time I have ever heard of your type of failure. So...my opinion is it is very rare!

    John Clary
    Greer, SC

    Life... is what happens as you are making plans.
    SDC member since 1975
    John Clary
    Greer, SC

    SDC member since 1975

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    • #3
      My brother had a 61 f&^$ pickup.One day driveing back from south Lake Tahoe and going down HWY 50 we stopped for gas in El Dorado Hills. As we pulled up to the pump one of the links came apart. That was fourty years ago so what came apart is lost in my memory.It happens.

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      • #4
        There were/are three generations of reach rods on early Ccabs...
        The first generation has non-adjustable ends on BOTH ends.
        The second generation had one non-adjustable and one adjustable end.
        The third generation had adjustable ends on BOTH ends.
        the best setup was the third generation, which could easily be replaced.
        What do you have?
        Jeff[8D]




        http://community.webshots.com/user/deepnhock
        HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

        Jeff


        Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



        Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

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        • #5
          Did it actually brake or come apart? I've never seen a drag link or steering stud break. I have seen several fall apart from wear. Most memorable of them involved a IH pickup my brother was driving with me as passenger in the mountains. He turned left into a horse curve at about
          10 or 15 MPH when it fell off on the left side. The truck turned sharper and over the hill we went. Fortunately it didn't roll. We ended up
          setting parallel to roadway on a 45 degree slope. Truck wasn't damaged as I remember.

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          • #6
            Thanks all for your replies.

            Jeff- The broken drag link was the original type as installed at the factory, with both ends welded and not adjustable. So, my broken one is likely 1950 vintage. The replacement is the newest type, adjustable on both ends.

            Hotwheels - I don't think inspection would have found this one, as the stud broke just at the bottom of the taper where it is hidden by the rubber boot. Inspection would find looseness of the ball in the socket. The joint did not fail from wear with the ball pulling out of the socket. I had previously removed the drag link to take down the oil pan to clean the sludge out of it. At that time, all the balls seemed reasonably tight, and I replaced the rubber boots on the drag link. The only real looseness was in the steering gear box.

            Leyrrit - The stud broke. The ball did not pull out of the socket, which is the usual type of failure, likely due to wear from lack of lubrication or abrasion from dirt entering through a failed rubber boot.

            On further thought, when I removed the drag link, it took heroic effort to get the studs loose on their tapers. Neither tapping with a heavy hammer nor heat worked. I finally used a pickle fork with a 3# brass hammer to wedge the link and stud out of the taper. Perhaps I yielded the stud in tension from the wedging action at the narrow neck below the taper. If I did, nothing obvious showed. The tapered surfaces were not rusted, only really adhered to each other. I reassembled with NevRSeize.

            Again, thanks everybody. I appreciate your answers. Phil.

            Philip W Birkeland
            1950 Studebaker 2R10

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            • #7
              Inspect the crack closely. If it was previously cracked you may detect a shiny section in the crack or possibly rust.

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