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  • #16
    I have a 55 champion that would probably be a bettewr vehicle if it had a newer rearend . Would a Explorer be a good idea?

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    • #17
      [quote]Originally posted by stan zoerner

      I have a 55 champion that would probably be a bettewr vehicle if it had a newer rearend . Would a Explorer be a good idea?
      [/quote
      Ford Rangers after 92. They have a 3.55 and a 3.73 gears.


      7G-Q1 49 2R12 10G-F5 56B-D4 56B-F2

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      • #18
        quote:Originally posted by stan zoerner

        I have a 55 champion that would probably be a bettewr vehicle if it had a newer rearend . Would a Explorer be a good idea?
        That depends on how you define "better vehicle"!

        Would the Ford brakes work with the Stude. fronts, without rear lockup or overworking the fronts?

        Would you ruin (warp) the Ford axle tube welding on new Stude. spring perches?

        Would the wheel offset and axle width fit the wheels properly deep inside the fenders?

        Would one of the (2) axle ratios be right for whatever transmission you have and type of driving you do without lugging the 101 HP Engine pulling a 3400lb car?

        Do you have Overdrive?

        If the issue is an over-revving engine, many higher ratio (lower numerical) ring and pinion sets are available for Dana/Spicer model 23 rear axles. Also a stronger model 44 complete assy. of a higher ratio can be swapped in from a V-8 Stude. using the same brakes or upgrading to V-8 brakes.

        Exactly what is the problem with your car as built? [:0]

        StudeRich
        StudeRich
        Second Generation Stude Driver,
        Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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        • #19
          StudeRich one clue the rear brake hubs are to time consuming to take off. What were they thinking any way.


          7G-Q1 49 2R12 10G-F5 56B-D4 56B-F2

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          • #20
            If you have the proper puller, it takes five minutes, max, to pop off a rear drum. At least on a car that is in regular service, and that gets routine maintenance, and THAT is what the factory expected would be the case when they built the cars that way.

            Nobody in South Bend expected the cars to last 50 or 60 years, and they certainly didn't concern themselves with catering to folks who might want to easily remove rear brake drums from a car that has been sitting in a field for 25 years.

            Just so you know, if a car with flanged axles and "easily removable" drums has been sitting in a field for some 25 years, getting those drums off can be worse than removing a tapered axle hub. BTDT, got the scarred knuckles to prove it.

            I think a lot of folks are kind of scared to REALLY whale on that string wrench, and then really smack the center of the puller screw. You have to really beat hard on the ends of that wrench to get a lot of compression built up in the puller screw, and then a few hard blows on the end of the screw with a BFH normally does the trick.

            Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
            Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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            • #21
              And don't forget, tapered rear axles were industry standard on ALL makes, not just Studebaker for many years. Anyone know who was the first to go to flanged? I have a dim memory it was the 1960 Valiant, an innovative car in many respects - the first to have an alternator, for example. And it looks like something Studebaker would have built! Russ Farris
              1963 GT Hawk R-2 4-speed
              1964 Avanti R-1 Auto

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              • #22
                Seams like my 51 Olds had axle flanges but that was a long time ago (1961)!

                Bill, Many Fords and one great Stude!

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                • #23
                  quote:Originally posted by maxpower1954

                  And don't forget, tapered rear axles were industry standard on ALL makes, not just Studebaker for many years. Anyone know who was the first to go to flanged? I have a dim memory it was the 1960 Valiant, an innovative car in many respects - the first to have an alternator, for example. And it looks like something Studebaker would have built! Russ Farris
                  I don't know who was the first, but Ford switched in '49.
                  Also, my '60 Lark Marshal has a factory installed alternator, not exactly common though.


                  Skinny
                  Watertown, SD
                  Skinny___'59 Lark VIII Regal____'60 Lark Marshal___

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                  • #24
                    ISTR that the rear end in my '49 Chev. was flanged, although it was a newer rear... I think I determined that it was a mid-50's GM product.

                    nate

                    --
                    55 Commander Starlight
                    http://members.cox.net/njnagel
                    --
                    55 Commander Starlight
                    http://members.cox.net/njnagel

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                    • #25
                      The 66 Ramblers I've had in years past - they had tapered axles with hubs like a Stude, BUT, the drums were made to come off those hubs!


                      1957 Transtar 1/2ton
                      1963 Cruiser
                      1960 Larkvertible V8
                      1958 Provincial wagon
                      1953 Commander coupe
                      1957 President two door

                      No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

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