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  • Rear hub frustration

    This is getting absurd...

    I've gotten stuck on my Champ project because of one of those bloody rear hubs.

    I've got one of those pullers made from a hub and tried pulling the left rear drum following the directions... no luck. I actually stripped the threads off of some of the lugs.

    And yes, the shoes were pulled back.

    I even went to the extreme length of cutting away most of the brake drum and clamped the puller in place with a couple of pairs of Vice Grips along with the two good lug nuts and studs.

    I heated the hub for about 10 min. and cranked away at it again.

    One of the lug nuts took off like a bullet and I BENT one of the pairs of (cheap) vice grips!

    The base of the hub puller is also slightly bent!

    Any suggestions where to go from here? What if I cut the hub off?

    This is nuts!

    Thanks.

    Jeff DeWitt
    http://carolinastudes.net
    Jeff DeWitt
    http://carolinastudes.net

  • #2
    Jeff,

    If you have cut away most of the brake drum, you should have access to the nuts for the backing plate bolts (IIRC there are six). Taking off these nuts will allow you to pull the backing plate, axle, bearing, etc out of the rear axle. A machine shop should then be able to press the hub off the axle.

    Paul
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Visit The NEW Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com
    Paul
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks Paul, I just went out and pulled those bolts out and now the backing plate is lose but the axle and hub are as stubborn as ever... I was wondering if there might be a clip in the pumpkin but the parts book doesn't show one.

      If I can get the blasted thing loose this could work out real well, I can take this and the other hub (assuming IT comes off) and have the machine shop turn them for the Chevy drums and put in new studs... and have them fix the end of the axle where it's gotten a bit buggered up. [B)]

      Jeff DeWitt
      http://carolinastudes.net
      Jeff DeWitt
      http://carolinastudes.net

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      • #4
        It may take a couple of whacks with a big slide hammer to yank the axle.


        On its way to a 15.097 Island Dragway Great Meadows NJ Spring 2006.

        Comment


        • #5
          I use the drum (mounted loosely) as a slide hammer when pulling an axle. Not really a possibility here, though.

          You've already made it clear that the drum is junk. Go ahead and take a few whacks with the BFH. [^]

          Matthew Burnette
          Hazlehurst, GA

          Comment


          • #6
            No, that's not really a possibility, the biggest part of what is left of the drum is about 3 feet away from the hub!

            I had one suggestion to remove the bearing retainer held in by four bolts, but I don't see any such thing in the parts book (and it's dark and wet outside).

            Guess I need to get hold of a slide hammer...

            Jeff DeWitt
            http://carolinastudes.net
            Jeff DeWitt
            http://carolinastudes.net

            Comment


            • #7
              Yep, need a slide hammer or similar. The bearing race is a pretty snug fit into the end of the axle housing, and it takes some OOMPH to get it to move out. That race, with the bearing behind it, is what is holding the axle from coming out of the housing now that you removed the bolts.

              You mentioned someone said to remove the bearing retainer.....in a Dana axle like in your truck, the backing plate and the outer seal retainer are what keep the bearing in the housing.

              edited for spelling......
              Paul
              Winston-Salem, NC
              Visit The NEW Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com
              Paul
              Winston-Salem, NC
              Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

              Comment


              • #8
                Throw that whole rear end away and put something in there that has a more suitable ratio and maybe positraction. How about an explorer..with discs? Depending on your bolt pattern..

                Comment


                • #9
                  quote:Originally posted by buddymander

                  Throw that whole rear end away and put something in there that has a more suitable ratio and maybe positraction. How about an explorer..with discs? Depending on your bolt pattern..
                  Actually I thought about that, although whatever the ratio is it's fine, when the OD was working the truck was quite comfortable crusing at 75.

                  If I were to put something else under there I'd want it to have a 5x5 bolt pattern as on the new front disks.

                  However... I got the hub (and backing plate, and bearing, and axle) off! That's now going to the machine shop to get taken apart, the hub turned and new studs put in.

                  Of course now I have to get the other side off, and it's made that much harder because with the other side removed there is nothing to keep it from turning.

                  Jeff DeWitt
                  http://carolinastudes.net
                  Jeff DeWitt
                  http://carolinastudes.net

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    If you had used the proper tool you would have had no problem. I thought by now everyone that does much work with vehicles that have tapered axles would have and use the hub puller that attaches to three lug studs and has the dogbone. Ted Harbit was selling then for a while.

                    There have been posts going back at least 20 years that I can remember about using this tool.

                    Once the hub has been removed and the retaining bolts removed I bolt a chain around the axle under the nut that I have put back on. I bolt the chain around the handle of a sledge hammer and then take the slack out of the chain and then swing the hammer into the air so that the chain bottoms out and the inertia is transfered to the axle.

                    If you car is ugly then it better be fast.....

                    65 2dr sedan
                    64 2dr sedan (Pinkie)
                    61 V8 Tcab
                    61 Tcab 20R powered
                    55 Commander Wagon
                    54 Champion Wagon
                    46 Gibson Model A
                    50 JD MC
                    If you car is ugly then it better be fast.....

                    65 2dr sedan
                    64 2dr sedan (Pinkie)
                    61 V8 Tcab
                    63 Tcab 20R powered
                    55 Commander Wagon
                    54 Champion Wagon
                    46 Gibson Model A
                    50 JD MC
                    45 Agricat
                    67 Triumph T100
                    66 Bultaco Matadore

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I think the 71 and up chevy half tons were five on five and so were big buicks , pontiacs, oldsmobiles, and cadillacs from early fifties all the way to 1976. Even some of the ford cars like LTD's in the seventies were five on five. I've got a niner out of a late seventies LTD that is five on five with a 2:50 ratio. I had a 77 Mark V that was five on five with disc.

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                      • #12
                        Jeff - For whatever reason my chev drums on my 63 T-Cab are t-i-g-h-t and I hear things drag when I back out of the garage.
                        The shoes were 're-soled' before I made the conversion and probably need to have them arched to the drums.

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                        • #13
                          Tom, does anyone even do that anymore? I' not planning on replacing my shoes, they have very little wear on them, maybe just enough so I won't have the drag you mention.

                          Jeff DeWitt
                          http://carolinastudes.net
                          Jeff DeWitt
                          http://carolinastudes.net

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I don't think that linings can be ground to the drums any more - at least not legally where I live.

                            I have seen cases where shoes were backed off for disassembly and then replaced for assembly and the drums didn't want to go in. It tuned out that the emergency brake cable needed to also be backed off, as it was tightening the shoes - even though released at the handle.

                            ========================
                            63 Avanti R2, 4-Speed, 3.73 TT
                            Martinez, CA

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Many years ago I took an auto mechanics class and they taught us how to fit brake shoes to the drums, and had a nice machine to do it. Noting special, it had a rotating sanding drum and a bracket you attached the shoe to. You'd move a lever and rotate the shoe against the sanding drum. It was simple and worked well... no wonder it's illegal these days! (yeah, I know about the dust)

                              Jeff DeWitt
                              http://carolinastudes.net
                              Jeff DeWitt
                              http://carolinastudes.net

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