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64 Daytona Carburetor questions

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  • 64 Daytona Carburetor questions

    I plan on replacing the carburetor on a Daytona. It has a 259 V8, with a 2 bbl Stromberg carb.

    There is an old stock carburetor available. Here is the info on it:

    [u]Marked Bendix STROMBERG MODEL WW MFD BY ECLIPSE MACH. DIV. ELMIRA N.Y. USA

    The carton is marked 1963 STUDEBAKER V8 ALL PASSENGER CARS HAWK & LARK

    The part number is 1557976 </u>

    1. Does anyone know if this carb will replace the one on the 64 also?

    2. Could someone email me instructions on replacing and/or adjusting the new carb?

    I really appreciate everyone's help on this website. As a good deed, I am helping an older lady with her Studebaker, which she loves. I've learned that I am not as good a troubleshooter as I thought I was, but in the meantime, I'm going through the car and changing out items that need to be replaced, due to age, etc.

    Thank you






  • #2
    The replacement Carb. you have, if a it's a '63 it should have 6-130 stamped on the top half casting just above the fuel inlet fitting. The old 1964 one should be a 6-132 both are Stromberg model WW 2 Brl. carbs. and are interchangeable.
    They should have the "low choke" location on the Carb. near the base. Check to make sure there is a 3/8" fitting in the rear center of the Carb. base for the PCV hose and valve. Check the valve for flow TO the Carb. and away from the valve lifter cover and restricted in the opposite direction.

    It should require very little adjustment after bolting it on with the 4 5/16" N/F (fine) nuts. The choke may require an approximate adjustment for it's current location and Temp.

    StudeRich
    StudeRich
    Second Generation Stude Driver,
    Proud '54 Starliner Owner

    Comment


    • #3
      You might want to verify that the accell. pump is working. It's leather and needs Neatsfoot oil. It could have dried out on the shelf in the last 1/2 century. Well, 46 years.

      [img=left]http://www.alink.com/personal/tbredehoft/Avatar1.jpg[/img=left]
      Tom Bredehoft
      '53 Commander Coupe (since 1959)
      '55 President (6H Y6) State Sedan
      ....On the road, again....
      '05 Legacy Ltd Wagon
      All Indiana built cars

      Comment


      • #4
        Glenn,

        I followed your other thread on this. Did you ever find out why the car would quit while driving?

        If you didn't, I seriously doubt replacing the carb will cure a thing. It's a pretty simple device; if the car starts and runs, and goes down the road a couple of miles before it quits...you have a fuel delivery problem, either the pump which I think you checked already or very likely rust and debris in the tank clogging the pick-up line. This car is over 45 years old and God only knows what's in there. Dropping the tank is no big deal for a mechanical minded person like yourself (Although not a particulary pleasant task.) The great Studebaker brain trust here can walk you through what needs to be done. What you described is exactly the symptoms of debris in the pickup line. Rather than replacing parts helter-skelter hoping to cure the problem, start with a systemic approach beginning at the tank and work your way forward. Just trying to save you some time and grief...Russ Farris
        1963 GT Hawk R-2 4-speed
        1964 Avanti R-1 Auto

        Comment


        • #5
          Yes I doubt it needs a Carb. they can be rebuilt if needed, but it is not likely the prob. But, if you do replace it, save the old one it is NOT junk, all or parts of it can still be used! [:0]

          StudeRich
          StudeRich
          Second Generation Stude Driver,
          Proud '54 Starliner Owner

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks for everyone's help. It has been great.

            I never did figure out why the car died while running. It would be running ok, then lose power and quit. It would fire right up again only to die after anywhere from 100 yds to 1/2 mile or so. Interestingly, it was after I added 5 gallons of premium that it started running very poorly (missing) and I barely made it back to the owner's driveway. The next morning the car would not start. About 10 days ago a WWII pilot came over and squirted a little WD40 into the car while I was cranking the engine and it did "fire-up"

            I agree that it is probably not the carb. First, the reason I thought about replacing the carb is because the existing one is leaking some gasoline out of the side. Is this considered normal?

            Last weekend I completely drained the full gas tank - the fuel looked fine, no sign of water or debris in the gasoline (Also previously 10 gallons were added to the tank back in March and I added 5 gallons of premium about 3 weeks ago). I replaced both rubber fuel lines (the one at the gas tank and the one at the engine compartment). I blew out the existing fuel in both metal fuel lines with a compressor. When everything was back together I put 5 gallons of premium gas in the tank and started it. It fired up but ran very poorly, barely running. I used some carb cleaner while it was running, but it didn't help. The inside of the carb (what you can see using a flashlight anyway) looks clean now.

            Two months ago I replaced a leaking fuel pump with a unit from Studebaker International. Two weeks ago I replaced the fuel filter at the carb. I'm starting to wonder if the "new" fuel pump is defective. Either that or its something electrical. I will look into the electrical system further this weekend.

            I agree that a systematic approach is best. Any ideas?



            Comment


            • #7
              Hi Glenn! Here's an idea - does it have the original Prestolite distributor? At 50 or 60,000 miles the counter weights can become so worn the engine will run very poorly, especially under any kind of load. I've bought a few Larks with this condition - the fix back then was to replace it with the excellent "window" type Delco used on '60 and '61 Larks. It's been a long time since I dealt with a Presto, but I'm sure the peanut gallery can tell you how to check it out.

              I hate to be pedantic about cleaning out the fuel tank, but I went through the same drill you did; draining the tank, replacing the lines, blowing it out with air and I STILL had to remove the tank to clean it out - there was so much random crap in there, a piece of trash would suck up against the pick-up tube in no time. But check the distributor out first. Post some pictures of your friend's car, we all like to look at Studebakers... Russ Farris
              1963 GT Hawk R-2 4-speed
              1964 Avanti R-1 Auto

              Comment


              • #8
                You might connecting a pressure/vacuum gauge into your fuel line before the carb visible inside of car. I know's a pain and you have to be careful you don't get a leak, but it will tell you alot. If it has fuel pressure at carb when it quits you should have fuel to that point.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Glenn,

                  If I recall from earlier posts, this thing ran fine at one point and then was acting up the next time it was driven. If it were a worn distributor, this problem would have come about gradually. Now, it could be that the condensor or the the coil have failed all of a sudden. The condensor being the more likely of the two.

                  Again, the bit of "leakage" around the throttle shaft, while not honestly "normal" is actually a pretty common occurrance on these WW carbs. And it's not a detriment to the engine's operation.

                  Checking the fuel pressure as has been suggested, would be a good move here. It requires a gage that can be fitted to the output line of the fuel pump, but those aren't that hard to find. Fuel pressure should be steady at anywhere from 2 to 4 lbs.
                  I'd also try using a piece of fuel hose to pump fuel into a coffee can or some such so you can visibly SEE if there's any contaminents being delivered to the carb as well as good quantity in the process as well.

                  I've seen a '64 with the very same symptoms you describe - EXACTLY - that turned out to be a cracked ignition switch! When I had eliminted everything else, in frustration I looked up under the dash to see if the wires on the switch were loose. What I saw was that the plastic body of the switch had split with age. A new switch, and the car purred once again!


                  1957 Transtar 1/2ton
                  1963 Cruiser
                  1960 Larkvertible V8
                  1958 Provincial wagon
                  1953 Commander coupe
                  1957 President two door

                  No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks for all the great tips. I will go through every one of them. Once I (hopefully) get the car running, I'll take a nice picture of it outside the cluttered garage and post it. it may take a while as i can only get to it in my spare time. You guys are a great help.

                    Someone mentioned not the throw out the old carb if I replace it. I wont do this as these parts need to be kept in circulation. The carb looks good, I think it may just need a rebuild.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Forgot to mention that one of the things I did was jiggle the ignition while driving the car (when it was running a bit better). Didn't seem to make any difference. But I will definitely look under the dash per your suggestion, Mr. Biggs.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Yeah Biggs, the distributor shouldn't go bad suddenly, but it should be an easy thing for him to check out and eliminate. And how well a car runs
                        can be different to people - it could have been running slowly worse over a long period of time before the timing went wild enough to make it run
                        really bad. Russ Farris
                        1963 GT Hawk R-2 4-speed
                        1964 Avanti R-1 Auto

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I believe I refered you to the owner of the NOS carb.Believe me it is the same as the ones I removed from a 63 259ci & a 64 289ci to be replaced by a 4bbl.Hope this puts your mind at ease about it being the right carb.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Two more ideas for you. My 62 GT would run great until it was time to replace the points, and then it would have the problems you describe.(2) You might consider having your present carb rebuilt.
                            When I talked to my carb man he told me that carb, along with the
                            Rochester 2bl are both obsolete. If you do it now you should be
                            able to get the parts, and even if it isn't unusual to have a
                            throttle shaft leak I think its a fire hazard and I wouldn't want
                            to take that chance. A good carb man should be able to rebuild
                            the carb you have now for around $200.00

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              We ordered the "new" old stock carburetor. But it doesn't come with a mounting gasket. Does anyone have a recommendation for the best material (and thickness of material) I could use to fabricate a gasket or should I just order a gasket from ? Can anyone think of anything else I will need when replacing the carb?

                              Thank you

                              If and when we get the car going, I'll post to let everyone know what the problem with the car was.

                              Comment

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