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Over all maintenance for 1963 Avanti

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  • #16
    Left front as in driver's front. It could be:

    1. Overflow hose from the sure tank.
    2. The surge tank.
    3. The radiator
    4. An expansion plug rusted through.
    5. Upper radiator hose
    6. Water manifold
    7. Bleeder valve.

    All of those could get water all the way to the tire, via a spritz or spray. The upper radiator hose leaking near the battery is a likely candidate. You should be able to visually examine each of those points for evidence of leakage.



    ========================
    63 Avanti R2, 4-Speed, 3.73 TT
    Martinez, CA

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    • #17
      So, I tried looking for the place where the coolant was leaking from, and it is coming from somewhere either on or connecting to the engine. I felt a hole, but couldn't see where it was coming from.

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      • #18
        I'd be thinking expansion plug (aka core plug or frost plug).

        Common for them to be rusted through on a car this old. Knock them all out, then use screwdrivers, coat hanger wire, and a pressure hose to clean all the crud and sludge out of the water jacket. Replace the two block drain plugs as well.

        It's a dirty, tedious, messy job, but the parts investment is well under $20. Your engine will cool much better with the sludge gone, too. Unless you KNOW this job has been done recently, you can safely assume it needs to be done.

        Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
        Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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        • #19
          Do I have to get new expansion plugs, or can I put someting else in it for the meantime

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          • #20
            If you solidly & safely place the car on jack stands, it is possible to star and run the car while lifted. Then it is easier to see where the water is coming from.

            If it is a bad core plug, then it will need to be addressed. I have seen block sealer used to add to the cooling system on fresh rebuilds to seal up a slight leak, when replacing the plug with some sealer around it didn't fully work. But I would do it to an engine that's been running for miles and miles.

            New expansion plugs and the cleaning procedure mentioned above is the correct way, assuming it to be a core plug.

            ========================
            63 Avanti R2, 4-Speed, 3.73 TT
            Martinez, CA

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            • #21
              Do I have to get new expansion plugs, or can I put someting else in it for the meantime

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              • #22
                You can buy rubber expandable core plugs that install with just a wrench. You'll still need to knock the old one out, but the rubber ones are perfectly secure. They can be removed again when you want to do a real block flush. I can't say that they'll last for 40 years, but they're better than 40 year old steel ones.

                nate

                --
                55 Commander Starlight
                http://members.cox.net/njnagel
                --
                55 Commander Starlight
                http://members.cox.net/njnagel

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                • #23
                  Did you verify where the leak is coming from visually? Water under pressure can begin from one place and end up in a very different place very easily.

                  You need to fill it up with water, Make sure you put the cap back on tightly, jack it up so you can get underneath, run the car until it's hot, shut it off and then get under there with a light and look for the source of the leak.

                  Expansion plugs are not the easiest thing to replace and there are lots of potential sources for water leaks. They may be bad but you need to make sure and not just assume that's the problem because it's suggested on the forum.

                  ErnieR




                  On its way to a 15.097 Island Dragway Great Meadows NJ Spring 2006.

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                  • #24
                    I have confirmed it is a expansion plug problem..

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                    • #25
                      quote:Originally posted by rickburgen

                      I have confirmed it is a expansion plug problem..
                      Expansion plug (always called them freeze plugs) were probably all put in at the same time - so they are the same age. After this one is fixed, I would check all the others - just to be safe.


                      <div align="left">1960 Lark 60S-W4</div id="left"> <div align="right">1962 7E7-122</div id="right">
                      [img=left]http://i96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/62champ/car/8b0ac4c6.jpg[/img=left]
                      [img=right]http://i96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/62champ/car/DSC02237.jpg[/img=right]

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                      • #26
                        the hole in the engine doesnt see possible to me to be the freeze plugs. The hole that I felt was the size of a pencil tip. I just received the plugs I had ordered, and they seem way to big to be the cause.

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