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Surface Rust on Freshly-Turned Journals?

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  • Surface Rust on Freshly-Turned Journals?

    I just unpacked a crank I had turned and balanced a year or so ago.
    I'd moved, and packed it away in storage after greasing the journals...only not greasy enough, since some of them have rusted while in storage, thanks to the salty/humid "atmosphere" here in lovely Houston.

    Making this jolly scenario even better--the journals were custom-polished to compensate for the extra thickness of the bearings which I had slick-coated at Polydyn. (sniff)

    How badly am I screwed? Is there a CASO way to fix the journal rust at home? Or do I get to have the crank done again?

    Eddie (snivel)[B)]

  • #2
    Sure, for years all I have ever done for surface rust (not deep pits) on camshafts and crankshafts is to use non-abrasive chrome polish. Sometimes even car wax can be used to take off very light rust.

    Of course I follow that up with a cleaner, then lather up with assembly lube.

    If the rust is thicker (but still not pitted) then I might first use a naval jelly or similar product to remove the heavy rust deposits, then I follow that up with chrome polish as above.

    If you wanted to get real fancy about it you could find yourself a plastic trash barrel, fill it with soda wash, pop in a scarificial iron annode and your crankshaft. Connect an arc welder or battery charger: positive to the annode, negative to your crankshaft. Do not let the annode touch the crankshaft. The arc welder works very fast, most guys feel safer using a battery charger.

    Thomas

    Long time hot rodder
    Packrat junk collector
    '63 Avanti R2 4 speed

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    • #3
      quote:Originally posted by Eddie

      I just unpacked a crank I had turned and balanced a year or so ago.
      I'd moved, and packed it away in storage after greasing the journals...only not greasy enough, since some of them have rusted while in storage, thanks to the salty/humid "atmosphere" here in lovely Houston.
      Making this jolly scenario even better--the journals were custom-polished to compensate for the extra thickness of the bearings which I had slick-coated at Polydyn. (sniff)
      How badly am I screwed? Is there a CASO way to fix the journal rust at home? Or do I get to have the crank done again?
      I doubt if it is hurt. I have used steel wool and kerosene (or rust penetrator) to wipe off light rust.



      Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia. '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Daytona convertible, '53 Commander Starliner, Museum R-4 engine, '62 Gravely Model L, '72 Gravely Model 430

      Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
      '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

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      • #4
        Go to your good local FLAPS and get a sheet or two of crocus cloth, tear it into strips, and polish the journals with that. It's an ultra-fine abrasive that's meant to be used for just this sort of thing.

        I like to use it wetted with solvent. Once polished, the journals should be washed, of course.

        Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
        Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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        • #5
          What Gord said. jimmijim
          sigpicAnything worth doing deserves your best shot. Do it right the first time. When you're done you will know it. { I'm just the guy who thinks he knows everything, my buddy is the guy who knows everything.} cheers jimmijim*****SDC***** member

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          • #6
            WD-40 works good too in removing rust when used with a fine steel wool or scotch-brite pad. I like using scotch-brite pads due to their not leaving bits of steel wool that can rust later.

            60 Lark convertible
            61 Champ
            62 Daytona convertible
            63 G.T. R-2,4 speed
            63 Avanti (2)
            66 Daytona Sport Sedan
            59 Lark wagon, now V-8, H.D. auto!
            60 Lark convertible V-8 auto
            61 Champ 1/2 ton 4 speed
            62 Champ 3/4 ton 5 speed o/drive
            62 Champ 3/4 ton auto
            62 Daytona convertible V-8 4 speed & 62 Cruiser, auto.
            63 G.T. Hawk R-2,4 speed
            63 Avanti (2) R-1 auto
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            66 Daytona Sport Sedan(327)V-8 4 speed
            66 Cruiser V-8 auto

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            • #7
              quote:I like using scotch-brite pads due to their not leaving bits of steel wool that can rust later.
              Amen! Steel wool is SO last century.

              Chris Pile
              Editor: The Studebaker Special
              http://midwaystudebakers.tripod.com/
              The only difference between death and taxes is that death does not grow worse every time Congress convenes. - Will Rogers

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              • #8
                WARNING........
                "Crocus cloth" comes in different grits. Anything courser than 600 grit will ruin your crank.

                Just get some 600 or 1000 grit wet or dry sand paper.
                The old fashioned way...cut and wrap the sand paper around the journala, then a shoe string around twice (one FULL wrap), spray WD-40 (or simillar) liberally while sawing the shoe string back and forth to spin the sand paper.

                [u]It may just be better..easier to make a return trip to "a" machine shop to have it "properly" repolished.</u>
                They should be able to do this without hurting your bearing clearance by much more than...not enopugh to hurt it..!

                Mike

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                • #9
                  Mike, the only product I've seen sold as "crocus cloth" has a brick-red coating, and is very fine indeed, finer than 1200 grit. It is meant for polishing. Coarser grades are usually sold as "emery cloth" or simply abrasive cloth.

                  The true crocus cloth has a fabric base, and you don't need the shoe string, although it would indeed be useful if you use 1200 grit wet-or-dry paper.

                  Could be there are regional differences in the naming of such products.

                  Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
                  Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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                  • #10
                    Whats so wrong with taking it back to the shop and having it professionally prepped? I don't take chances with cranks.

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                    • #11
                      Well, the original poster DID specifically ask for a CASO method, didn't he?

                      Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
                      Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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                      • #12
                        quote:Originally posted by buddymander

                        Whats so wrong with taking it back to the shop and having it professionally prepped? I don't take chances with cranks.
                        How expensive is the embarrassment one feels? I know I was when I had to take the oil pan back to the derusters for the second time after I'd let it sit and get rusty again.

                        Tim K.
                        '64 R2 GT Hawk
                        Tim K.
                        \'64 R2 GT Hawk

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                        • #13
                          quote:Originally posted by gordr

                          Well, the original poster DID specifically ask for a CASO method, didn't he?

                          Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
                          Thanks for all the hints and ideas, guys!

                          Trust me...I'd much rather do it right by having the machine shop repolish the crank; a cold, amber, frothy mug of, err, *water* takes care of embarrassment.

                          Circumstances being what they are, though, LOCOCASOMUCHO I gotsta be for the present.

                          Eddie

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                          • #14
                            Your spot on with your definition Gord. I grew up with these same definitions in NW new mexico (oil and gas country) big city of PHX is hard to find it. I don't think you'll find it at the FLAPS. Industrial bearing supplies or machinist supply is your only bet.
                            quote:Originally posted by gordr

                            Mike, the only product I've seen sold as "crocus cloth" has a brick-red coating, and is very fine indeed, finer than 1200 grit. It is meant for polishing. Coarser grades are usually sold as "emery cloth" or simply abrasive cloth.

                            The true crocus cloth has a fabric base, and you don't need the shoe string, although it would indeed be useful if you use 1200 grit wet-or-dry paper.

                            Could be there are regional differences in the naming of such products.

                            Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

                            Russ Shop Foreman "Rusty Nut Garage"
                            53 2R6 289 5SpdOD (driver)
                            57 SH (project)
                            60 Lark VIII 2dr sd (driver)

                            Russ Shop Foreman \"Rusty Nut Garage\"
                            53 2R6 289 5SpdOD (driver)
                            57 SH (project)
                            60 Lark VIII 2dr sd (driver)

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                            • #15
                              Return it to the machine shop so they can use crocus cloth on the journals. jimmijim edited for spilling.
                              sigpicAnything worth doing deserves your best shot. Do it right the first time. When you're done you will know it. { I'm just the guy who thinks he knows everything, my buddy is the guy who knows everything.} cheers jimmijim*****SDC***** member

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