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  • Rear brake drum removal.

    I am trying to check out the brakes on my 63 Lark. I can get into the fronts fine, but the rears are posing a problem. I have removed the axle nut but the thing won't budge. I read on a previous thread about a 57 hawk that needed to use a puller to remove the rear drums...would the same be true for my Lark?
    If so...where could I pick one up and at what cost?

    Thanks!




    1963 Lark, 259 V8, two-tone paint, Twin Traction. Driven often, always noticed!

  • #2
    I believe Phil Collins in Phoenix rents one. Yes, with very minor exceptions (post 64) all Studebaker rear brake drums need a puller to get them off.

    [img=left]http://www.alink.com/personal/tbredehoft/Avatar1.jpg[/img=left]
    Tom Bredehoft
    '53 Commander Coupe (since 1959)
    '55 President (6H Y6) State Sedan
    (Under Construction 617 hrs.)
    '05 Legacy Ltd Wagon
    All Indiana built cars

    Comment


    • #3
      Drum pullers also appear with some regularity on eBay as well... usually go for around $50.

      <h5>Mark
      '57 Transtar Deluxe
      Vancouver Island Chapter
      http://sdcvi.shawwebspace.ca/ </h5>


      Mark Hayden
      '66 Commander
      Zone Coordinator
      Pacific Can-Am Zone

      Comment


      • #4
        This is the kind I have:

        http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/Unive...lenotsupported

        ========================
        63 Avanti R2, 4-Speed, 3.73 TT
        Martinez, CA

        Comment


        • #5
          Just a word of warning, you may have to beat, bang, and cuss to get your drums off with a puller. I learned that if you use the kind that FMarshall is suggesting, it can bugger up your lug bolt threads. I know from experience.

          Comment


          • #6
            A key point. You need a hub puller, not a drum puller. You are pulling the hub which the drum happens to be mounted to. Always reverse the nut and put it on flush with the end of the axle before using any hub puller. This not only prevents the hub/drum from flying off, but more importantly, helps to prevent thread damage and mushrooming of the axle end.

            Gary L.
            Wappinger, NY

            SDC member since 1968
            Studebaker enthusiast much longer
            Gary L.
            Wappinger, NY

            SDC member since 1968
            Studebaker enthusiast much longer

            Comment


            • #7
              I have read repeatedly on this forum that the
              one suggested by FMarshall (or similar) is in fact the correct
              hub puller for Studebaker rear axles. What other type would
              you use?

              Joe D.

              Comment


              • #8
                I have one that is very similar to what FMarshal has listed. I have used it over the years without any problem. I turn the nut around as suggested and if the hub doesn't come loose with a few cranks of the handle, I will leave it with tension on it and usually by the next morning it comes loose. (Only one time I've had to do it that way)

                George
                Grants Pass, Oregon
                64 Station Wagon with fixed roof (Canadian Car)

                64 Wagonaire sliding roof South Bend car.

                63 GT Hawk

                51 Champion Starlight Coupe
                George King
                Grants Pass, Oregon
                64 Station Wagon with fixed roof (Canadian Car)

                66 Station Wagon with fixed roof. Project car, complete For Sale...

                64 Wagonaire sliding roof South Bend car. For Sale...

                63 GT Hawk

                51 Champion Starlight Coupe For Sale...

                Comment


                • #9
                  Go on Chuck Collins website (StudebakerParts.com) and see the puller he recommends (made from an old hub and a jackscrew).

                  You use it without hammers, torches or anything else, and the hub pops off the tapered axle like the temp gauge pops up on a Christmas turkey.

                  I'll never go back to abusing my hubs until they fall off begging for mercy.

                  JohnP, driving & reviving
                  an early Lark
                  sigpic
                  JohnP, driving & reviving
                  60 Lark & 58 Scotsman 4dr

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Dont expect it to come off easy either. With pressure on the hub, you might have to wait a couple hours or even overnight when you'll hear a BANG. Make sure you have the axle nut on flush with the axle shaft and the castle portion facing in when you put pressure on the hub. If you have an oxy-acetelene torch, you may have to put some heat on the hub if its really being stubborn. Also, when reassembling it, DO NOT USE ANY GREASE ON THE SHAFT! Just make sure the hub & shaft are clean & smooth, assemble it loose, install the woodruff key, tighten to 175 ft/lbs torque & then to the next castle opening & install a new cottier pin.

                    60 Lark convertible
                    61 Champ
                    62 Daytona convertible
                    63 G.T. R-2,4 speed
                    63 Avanti (2)
                    66 Daytona Sport Sedan
                    59 Lark wagon, now V-8, H.D. auto!
                    60 Lark convertible V-8 auto
                    61 Champ 1/2 ton 4 speed
                    62 Champ 3/4 ton 5 speed o/drive
                    62 Champ 3/4 ton auto
                    62 Daytona convertible V-8 4 speed & 62 Cruiser, auto.
                    63 G.T. Hawk R-2,4 speed
                    63 Avanti (2) R-1 auto
                    64 Zip Van
                    66 Daytona Sport Sedan(327)V-8 4 speed
                    66 Cruiser V-8 auto

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Had my 57 Broadmoor on a lift with tension on the hub puller and neglected to put castle nut on. Left it for awhile and when I returned it had popped off, hit da floor and broke a few chunks off. It was finned drum, so had to replace it with non finned. Sickening lesson.
                      Kim

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                      • #12
                        Just a regular propane torch with the hub under tension from my puller worked for me - popped right off. Russ Farris
                        1963 GT Hawk R-2 4-speed
                        1964 Avanti R-1 Auto

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Thanks for all of your insight! A friend of mine who works on cars as a hobby told me that he had a puller I could use. I am going to pick it up tonight. We will see over the weekend how I do.




                          1963 Lark, 259 V8, two-tone paint, Twin Traction. Driven often, always noticed!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            If you ever in the greater Chicago area, you can borrow mine. Some other advice is, be sure to use a nice heavy sledge hammer versus a little one. One good smack and mine rear drums came right off my 1954 Commander Coupe.

                            Oran

                            quote:Originally posted by tutone63

                            I am trying to check out the brakes on my 63 Lark. I can get into the fronts fine, but the rears are posing a problem. I have removed the axle nut but the thing won't budge. I read on a previous thread about a 57 hawk that needed to use a puller to remove the rear drums...would the same be true for my Lark?
                            If so...where could I pick one up and at what cost?

                            Thanks!




                            1963 Lark, 259 V8, two-tone paint, Twin Traction. Driven often, always noticed!
                            Oran Ashley
                            http://photobucket.com/54stude

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Thanks, Oran! Unfortunately I live far enough away to take you up on that offer, but rest assured, if I am around there, I will gladly accept if I am in need!




                              1963 Lark, 259 V8, two-tone paint, Twin Traction. Driven often, always noticed!

                              Comment

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