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Learning to work on Studebakers, or any old car

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  • DEEPNHOCK
    replied
    I read all sorts of magazines about fixin' stuff.
    But I found that it is the most fun to work on a Studebaker when you have a skilled techical helper......
    Sooooo many questions to ask about stuff 'down there'..
    Jeff[8D]





    http://community.webshots.com/user/deepnhock

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  • maxpower1954
    replied
    Yeah, I saw that when I looked at my copy again, Andy. At least you're cool enough to know who R. Crumb was! Russ Farris

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  • Andy R.
    replied
    Our '65 Bug is long gone, but I can't toss the book. It's far too entertaining.

    One correction - The illustrations are by Peter Aschwanden. His style is similar to that of R. Crumb, but a bit less scratchy, and many less lady parts.[:0]

    Andy
    62 GT

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  • BobGlasscock
    replied
    Just a reminiscence, but the 'first' of every single auto repair I learned to do was on my current Studebaker. Oil changes, distributor, spark plugs, brakes, upholstery..... everything. And all of it at my father's side. Oh, such memories. I am a very lucky guy.

    '50 Champion, 1 family owner

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  • 1962larksedan
    replied
    I had a copy of the 'Compleat Idiot's Guide to VW's' as well ca. 1980------------definitely entertaining.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Borrowed Bams50's sigline here:

    "Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"

    Leave a comment:


  • Anne F. Goodman
    replied
    Wow I just Love my VW Book I bought a 1969 Vw Squareback on July 10, 1977 it was the first car that I bought with my hard earned money. My Dad bought me the book and said here you go you wanted a VW now learn how it works. He was a Chevy engine rebuilder. He introduced me to German Auto Repair. They answered alot of my questions. It was up to me to repair that car. I only sole it 5 years ago. Bought it for 850. sold it for 1200. Amazing still miss that car.

    Mabel 1949 Champion
    Hawk 1957 Silverhawk
    Gus 1958 Transtar
    The Prez 1955 President State
    Blu 1957 Golden Hawk
    Daisy 1954 Commander Regal Coupe
    Fresno,Ca

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  • SteveH
    replied
    OK, start the Twilight Zone theme; in the trunk of the Lark I just acquired were a set of ................ VW Bug running boards.

    Its a sign. (of what I'm not sure, but its a sign)

    Its not the years in your life that matters, its the life in your years.

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  • Kurt
    replied
    I too was into VW's. I knew absolutely nothing about them. I also bought John Muir's idiot book. That was the single best repair book I have ever used. In no time I knew VW's inside and out. The VW's are long gone, but I still have the idiot book. I read it from time to time for entertainment. Maybe some day I'll get a Beetle again.

    66 Commander R1 Clone
    51 Commander 4dr

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  • PlainBrownR2
    replied
    quote:
    Its unfortunate, but this forum isn't organized so you can lay it open on your fender and go to work. I agree with the book concept, but for one person (or a group) to set it up, they would have to have someone there asking one question after another. Which is what we have here. Probably ought to check with Mr. Shaw about permission to excerpt and print in print media.
    Then, scour the forum, gather all questions together with all pertinent answers, build an index and find a publisher.
    This is an area I am all too familiar with. The art of referencing somebody elses work is something I have been doing for literally every science research paper assignment since attending college(and a little bit of high school) since Day 1. It has to be performed in the event the author or the school of the original work looks over my work, and says "hey, that's not his research!!", which could land me in a level of trouble that can have a man removed from the campus. So, I have to cite or reference every piece of research that is not mine, which, even though at most times is alot, is the honorable thing to do. Plus it allows me to say, "Yes, I know the work is not mine, but I did give the author credit, and it's right there". Before I go to much further, I usually use APA for Science research, MLA if it's English research or an English paper, and Chicago style if it's historical research. In this case I would probably suggest using APA style, and locating a book that contains all of the rules for using citations using APA style. In the past I've used a couple of books, but the current one I use is the Fifth Edition Publication Manual, which is authored by the American Psychological Association. Within the book contains the rules for grammar, as well as all of the citations and reference citations that can be used from books, magazines, electronic media, the Internet(including sites such as this one), audiotapes, interviews, and what have you. Usually I cite them in the paper and then put a reference page at the bottom of the document or at the back of the paper for APA citations.

    [IMG=left]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/55%20Studebaker%20Commander%20Streetrod%20Project/P1010531-1.jpg[/IMG=left]
    [IMG=left]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/55%20Studebaker%20Commander%20Streetrod%20Project/P1010550-1.jpg[/IMG=left]
    [IMG=right]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/Ex%20Studebaker%20Plant%20Locomotive/P1000578-1.jpg[/IMG=right]
    [IMG=right]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/My%201964%20Studebaker%20Commander%20R2/P1010168.jpg[/IMG=right]

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  • JeffDeWitt
    replied
    Just remembered one problem with the Muir book.

    It suggests that if your brake shoes get contaminated with brake fluid to burn the fluid off. That works fine with riveted shoes but can cause some really unpleasant problems with bonded shoes.

    As I found out the hard way!

    Jeff DeWitt
    http://carolinastudes.net

    Leave a comment:


  • Tom Bredehoft
    replied
    Its unfortunate, but this forum isn't organized so you can lay it open on your fender and go to work. I agree with the book concept, but for one person (or a group) to set it up, they would have to have someone there asking one question after another. Which is what we have here. Probably ought to check with Mr. Shaw about permission to excerpt and print in print media.
    Then, scour the forum, gather all questions together with all pertinent answers, build an index and find a publisher.

    Been there, didn't do that.

    [img=left]http://www.alink.com/personal/tbredehoft/Avatar1.jpg[/img=left]
    Tom Bredehoft
    '53 Commander Coupe (since 1959)
    '55 President (6H Y6) State Sedan
    (Under Construction 617 hrs.)
    '05 Legacy Ltd Wagon
    All Indiana built cars

    Leave a comment:


  • bams50
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by ISpy

    a basic overlay,then the checklist stuff with pics/diagrams...it would be nice to know what swaps around year-year and power train power train
    That's exactly why I got involved with this Forum- I knew nothing about Studebakers. I've spent a lot of late nights searching and reading threads here. If you have enough need for the knowledge it's already all here, online, available 24/7, and free[^]

    Robert (Bob) Andrews- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys)
    Parish, central NY 13131






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  • Kdancy
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by ISpy


    I also owned a # of Rabbits(diesels)there was a book for keeping the rabbit alive...
    I owned a Rabbit diesel (1980 Rabbit L )as well and used the same book along with the VW manual to work on it. Loved the book as it had short cuts and other things the factory manual didn't have. One of the best cars we ever owned, 200,000 miles before body rust and the fuel pump made me park it. Interior was still excellent condition, that vinyl was very good material.

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  • ISpy
    replied
    My second car was a 1974 VW Type 181..sold for 2 years here as the "Thing". Only sold in 73-74 as sales werent great and mandatory bumper laws didnt make it worth it to sell them anymore...in fact the 181 was used as the German "Jeep" from 69-80,it was the same thing(no pun intended)just painted bright colors...still had the point for the machine gun mount..hehehe. Sorry about the history but as Stude guys you understand I was a Thing guy....

    Anyway mine came with the VW book, I liked it. I never had to do anything crazy major but I liked what I recall as a very practical,pragmatic approach. I am not opposed to buying tools/equipment or such..but what the hell do I do if I just dont have a #9 Fluffengrubber ? Year before last I went on a car ralley were this is kinda the point so it is dear to my heart. I also owned a # of Rabbits(diesels)there was a book for keeping the rabbit alive...Now that I recall there was a Suburu one also, in fact I think they kinda did a "For Dummies" bit with "keep your xxx alive"...Kinda funny as in that ralley I ran a Sub Brat 265K,30+ MPG and didnt miss a lick other than a starchy carb at times...A liitle OT but I never knew the Sub engines were the same as the VW just water cooled and diff carb, I was told they got the design when Germans visted for a tech exchange during the Axis alliance...

    Back on topic...As I just pasted in the main forum I just pulled my Lark out of a barn after 25 years..I would love a book/manual like that...the check up list is good yes but a basic overlay,then the checklist stuff with pics/diagrams...it would be nice to know what swaps around year-year and power train power train..not sure how to put it,in my sit I have a 6 and am/was thinking about swapping to v8...didnt want to invest twice,N8 tells me most of what I was talking about works for both...

    Hey my car is just waiting for a book deal...

    Leave a comment:


  • DEEPNHOCK
    replied
    Me too Brad... It's been a while...
    But it stuck with me when I substituted the word Studebaker for motorcycle...
    Jeff[8D]


    quote:Originally posted by rockne10
    "Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance"
    by Robert M. Pirsig was about maintaining human virtues and values; very little in there about maintaining a motorcycle, other than the fact that you don't need to buy the fifty dollar part if you can accomplish the same thing with a piece of aluminum you cut from a beer can.
    I'll have to pull that one off the shelf. It's been forty years since I read it.
    Brad Johnson

    quote:Originally posted by DEEPNHOCK

    Sort of like that best seller "Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Repair"

    Leave a comment:

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