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noisy fuel pump?

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  • jclary
    replied
    We have covered this problem before, but I don't recall what post it was in and am too lazy to search. The main problem with some of the rebuilt pumps is the pivot pin. It is usually too long, with loose clearance, and therefore oil seeps by. A/C addressed this with a kit which may no longer be available. The kit is...
    [img][/img]
    and the instruction sheet
    [img][/img]

    If you are unable to find the kit, you can perform your own fix by removing the pin, make it shorter, and either thread a small portion of the hole on both sides of the fuel pump, install an appropriate size set screw, or use some type of adhesive/sealant such as JB Weld. I have found some of these pumps work just fine...the manufactured oil leak is an option that does not affect the pump's ability to pump gas.

    John Clary
    Greer, SC

    Life... is what happens as you are making plans.
    SDC member since 1975

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  • skyway
    replied
    Tutone,

    If you have not yet seen it, be sure to check out today's posting on defective rebuild kits.

    Gary

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  • StudeRich
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by GTtim

    Why not just get the correct pump from a Studebaker vendor?
    Because GOOD ones, (real original Stude./Carter) [u]that do not leak oil</u> are not available new, only re-buildable used, when you can find them.

    I would guess he is tired of trying to seal the actuating lever pin that is stupidly DRIVEN THROUGH THE CASE, so as to guarantee a big oil leak real soon, on the AC clone type Airtex pumps with no filter sold as: Master, Carter and other brand names, but all POC! [xx(] These also must not have the correct internal oil seal either.

    StudeRich

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  • Paul Keller
    replied
    My '63 289 also makes the same loud noise - Originally thought it to be a loose tappet and have since readjusted three times. Replaced the fuel pump recently w/ a Stude' vendor unit - Still the same noise. Using a stethoscope (sp?) the noise seems to be from the fuel pump.
    Paul keller

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  • tutone63
    replied
    Okay. I j b welded the leaky pivot point on my old pump and slapped that back on. She seems to be okay, but i still have yet to take her for a spin. Fingers crossed that i didn't do any damage. She isn't leaking either so far. To answer your question clonelark: the mopar pumps are cheaper, and (so i am told) last longer than the stock studebaker pumps. (if installed properly i assume). Personally, after this episode, i will probably go with stock from now on...just to be safe.




    1963 Lark, 259 V8, two-tone paint, Twin Traction. Driven often, always noticed!

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  • GTtim
    replied
    Why not just get the correct pump from a Studebaker vendor?

    Tim K.
    '64 R2 GT Hawk

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  • clonelark
    replied
    When i cleaned my engine and installed my supercharger i put a new fuel pump in that i have had for a spare, and it is doing the same thing, will click for a while and at other times run quiet. I assume this is the right fuel pump as it looked the same. I will change it soon and see what it does. Let me know what you find out and i will do the same. Also which Mopar 318 is correct? The old 318 or the new 318?

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  • StudeRich
    replied
    The pump arm has to be bent to a tighter angle than the Dodge, just like the Dodge/Carter Super Pumps for Avanti do. [:0]

    DO NOT run your engine with a unmodified Dodge pump! [xx(]

    In order to achieve the same gallons per minute of fuel delivery, protect the Pump, Cam Lobe and Cam bearings from damage, you need to duplicate the angle of your stock pump's actuating arm! [:0]

    StudeRich

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  • tutone63
    replied
    Oh my. This seems to make sense. I hope i havent already caused damage. I have j b welded my old pump in hopes that will serve as a temp fix. Looks like i will be putting the old one back. I still welcome your input, as i will have to wait til tomorrow to do any more work.




    1963 Lark, 259 V8, two-tone paint, Twin Traction. Driven often, always noticed!

    Leave a comment:


  • skyway
    replied
    Since no one else is jumping in I will.

    I don't remember the details, but it seems like folks used to use a MoPar pump on Stude V-8's, but you had to replace the MoPar operating arm with the one out of your original Studebaker pump. I believe at the time good Studebaker pumps were not easily had, and the MoPars were available.

    Also, beware that there are two absolutely different 318's; the old mechanical lifter engine (late '50's and into the early '60's), and the later hydraulic valve one. I'm thinking the Studebaker modification used the later MoPar pump.

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  • tutone63
    replied
    Well, I am just baffled. About ten minutes before I started this thread, I started the engine on the Lark, and it has been running for about a half hour now. No noise....yet. Now that I think about it, I ran for about 40 minutes before it got loud, and then it came on gradually. (I was washing the bugs off the front when I noticed it. I just let it run while I was cleaning)

    The oil level is where it should be, I just filled it yesterday.


    Okay, there she goes, about 40 minutes again. It sounds horrible. Like a wood block against a hammer. I think it is when the fuel pump itself gets hot.




    1963 Lark, 259 V8, two-tone paint, Twin Traction. Driven often, always noticed!

    Leave a comment:


  • tutone63
    started a topic noisy fuel pump?

    noisy fuel pump?

    My fuel pump was leaking oil on my 63 lark 259. A freind of mine who owns a 57 silver hawk said he had a lot of luck using a fuel pump from a dodge 318 motor. he told me that it was a direct swap. So, the other day, I replaced my stock Studebaker fuel pump with a rebuilt 1963 dodge 318 fuel pump. It seems to work fine. I have not driven it anywhere yet, but I have let it run and warm up, while I rev the motor to cruising rpms. (no red lines or hard spurts)

    It goes fine until it warms up, then it gets really loud, almost like a loud lifter...but about twice as loud. CLICK CLICK CLICK. Is this something I should worry about? If I rev the motor for a few seconds and drop it back down to idle, it goes away for a minute or two, then starts back up again. The higher the RPM's the louder it gets. Also, if I kill the motor for about 5 minutes and start it again, it is quiet for a few minutes before getting noisy again. My first impression is that is isn't getting a good oil flow? Or is this something I will have to live with from a dodge fuel pump?

    My biggest worry is causing damage to my engine. I could care less if the fuel pump is noisy, but if it is going to cause damage to my engine, I will just swap the leaky one back on for my trip to Cedar Rapids and deal with it later.

    Thoughts??

    Thanks!




    1963 Lark, 259 V8, two-tone paint, Twin Traction. Driven often, always noticed!
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