Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Avanti Project Photos

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • tluz
    replied
    Good tip on the machine shop. I have one because I had to have the king pin bushings reamed. He claims to have worked on Studes and, for what it's worth, was able to tell me without prompting that the Avanti came with a 289.

    Leave a comment:


  • jallen
    replied
    Good Luck on your project, I think most members would say you've
    already made a lot of progress. Don't ask how I know but I would
    start looking for a good machine shop if you don't already have one.
    They will be able to find lots of problems you would probably never
    see, and they will be able to save you time, money, and aggravation.

    Leave a comment:


  • JDP
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by tluz

    quote:Originally posted by jallen

    Do you have an estimate for when
    you'll be on the road?
    Late 2010 is a good guess. This car needs complete restoration and it took me almost 8 months to do what you see. Once I get the brake lines and fuel lines in, and make sure everything is properly torqued, and have someone who knows what he's doing come by and double-check my work, then I'll tear into the engine. The odometer reads 20,000, which means (judging from the car's condition) it went around at least once. If I'm lucky, I'll be able to keep some of the engine parts, and at minimum I'll have to do a complete cleaning and inspection of all parts. That job should take a couple of months.

    After that, the tranny, the body, the soundproofing, the electrical, the interior, the rubber... Maybe 2011 is a better guess.

    Hint, do not forget to install the radiator support before you drop the body on.

    JDP/Maryland

    Leave a comment:


  • tluz
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by jallen

    Do you have an estimate for when
    you'll be on the road?
    Late 2010 is a good guess. This car needs complete restoration and it took me almost 8 months to do what you see. Once I get the brake lines and fuel lines in, and make sure everything is properly torqued, and have someone who knows what he's doing come by and double-check my work, then I'll tear into the engine. The odometer reads 20,000, which means (judging from the car's condition) it went around at least once. If I'm lucky, I'll be able to keep some of the engine parts, and at minimum I'll have to do a complete cleaning and inspection of all parts. That job should take a couple of months.

    After that, the tranny, the body, the soundproofing, the electrical, the interior, the rubber... Maybe 2011 is a better guess.

    Leave a comment:


  • jallen
    replied
    WOW WOW WOW, I"m ready to trade. I'll even throw in my wheels and tires. That looks great, good job. Even if you didn't plan to be
    under the car wood blocks would be better, more stable and less
    likely to scratch the paint. Do you have an estimate for when
    you'll be on the road?

    Leave a comment:


  • sbca96
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by tluz

    For what it's worth, i have no need to crawl under the frame at the moment.
    I hear you on that one, I sometimes skip jack stands when I know I'm
    not going under the car, and take a chance. Usually with the car on
    a floor jack, the worst that will happen if it fails is the car will
    get stuck sitting on a bottomed out floor jack. If a jack stand is
    used instead, then the car gets stuck on a jack stand. The result is
    the same .. I have to use another car to go buy a new floor jack.

    Thanks for the pics, they are the best sales items Don could buy. I'm
    going with the larger pipes, and yes, Headers are a must.

    Tom

    Leave a comment:


  • tluz
    replied
    Pretty sure I have the bent steel brake hoses in the plastic box marked "brakes." I'll dig around this week and come up with them.

    Thanks for all the safety encouragement about the cinder blocks. This is the first I'd heard of it being a problem (I see cars on blocks all the time) so now I know.

    Leave a comment:


  • Thomas63R2
    replied
    As any karate chop artist will tell you, just slightly fracture a cinder block and they crumble.

    The problem with cinder blocks is that they don't generally fail...until the first time (maybe your last time!)

    Be safe, you've invested too much time and money not to do it right.

    Thomas

    Long time hot rodder
    Packrat junk collector
    '63 Avanti R2 4 speed

    Leave a comment:


  • JDP
    replied
    Looks like you missing the custom bent steel line to the hose, the bracket that holds it and the hose.

    JDP/Maryland

    Leave a comment:


  • bige
    replied
    I didn't see the brake hoses themselves. If you have an open hole and no hose from frame to caliper that's what's missing.


    On its way to a 15.097 Island Dragway Great Meadows NJ Spring 2006.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob Langer
    replied
    quote:

    I switched the disk brake crossover tubes so they match the shop manual pic. Makes more sense that way. What, if anything, plugs the remaining hole on the bottom inner caliper? Right now both calipers have one open hole.
    A short metal brake line. Shop manual shows it on page 3, figure 1.

    Bob Langer
    Glenshaw,PA



    Leave a comment:


  • tluz
    replied
    Exhaust pics for Tom. I'm not Don's sales agent, but he will tell you that he has copies of the original Studebaker templates.











    Hope this covers everything you wanted to see.

    Leave a comment:


  • tluz
    replied
    Hmmm. Never heard that. I'll pick up a few more stands this weekend. For what it's worth, i have no need to crawl under the frame at the moment.

    I switched the disk brake crossover tubes so they match the shop manual pic. Makes more sense that way. What, if anything, plugs the remaining hole on the bottom inner caliper? Right now both calipers have one open hole.

    Tom, I'll get a few exhaust pics for you ASAP. This is the stock Silvertone. Don and I discussed the 2 1/4" diameter and we concluded that, the way I intend to drive the car, I will almost never be in the RPM range where it will improve anything. He thinks it is worth 5-10 HP in the 4500 RPM range, so if you're drag racing it might be worth a couple of tenths. I assume if you go for the wider diameter you'd want headers, too.

    Leave a comment:


  • sbca96
    replied
    Jeff is right, cinderblocks are kinda like a house of cards, they do
    seem strong enough, but just the right change in load and they will
    suddenly crumble. I didnt even notice them in the picture. Make sure
    to get quality jack stands, not the split round tube style. When I've
    needed my jack stands, or wanted it to sit higher, some lumber yards
    have large square blocks of wood, and as ugly as they look old wheels
    make decent stands in a pinch (laying flat, not upright like salvage
    yards use them, and never stacked).

    Tom

    Leave a comment:


  • DEEPNHOCK
    replied
    In three words... YOU COULD DIE!
    They are not made to support any kind of load, especially the way you have them.
    A lot of people are killed each year doing just what you are doing.
    I had one crumble on me when I was 14..a long long time ago.
    PLEASE put them outside and put some real jackstands under there...
    Seriously, this is a MAJOR safety issue...for YOU!
    We don't need to hear about a tragedy later on that could be easily avoided now.
    Dump the cinder blocks.
    Read up on it here...
    http://tinyurl.com/mawvxz
    Jeff[8D]



    quote:Originally posted by tluz

    I have jack stands but I need them from time to time.
    What's wrong with cinder blocks?

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X