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Why superchargers fail

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  • studegary
    replied
    I believe in changing the fluid every 3000-5000 miles, but I do not remove the S/C to do it. I have posted the technique in the past.

    Gary L.
    Wappinger, NY

    SDC member since 1968
    Studebaker enthusiast much longer

    Leave a comment:


  • 53k
    replied
    Not that it will help you in this case, but we had a chapter member with a R-2 Avanti with well over 100,000 miles on the original supercharger with no failures. He used to tell me that the key to long life was to remove the supercharger (I don't remember the interval, but it was pretty short), turn it upside down and COMPLETELY drain the fluid before refilling.




    Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia. '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Daytona convertible, '53 Commander Starliner, Museum R-4 engine, '62 Gravely Model L, '72 Gravely Model 430

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  • maxpower1954
    replied
    Great, something else to worry about! I just recently got my 63 R-2 GT back on the road after a ten year hibernation; for some reason (like ignorance) I ran Dexron II in the s/c for 20,000 miles from 1988 to 1999 - I changed to Ford type F during the resurection. Keeping my fingers crossed...Russ Farris

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  • Thomas63R2
    replied
    At this point I do expect to find some drive balls with a differrent diameter (flatspots anyone?). My guess is that at least one drive ball is jammed in place. I'll take it apart next weekend.

    Thomas

    Long time hot rodder
    Packrat junk collector
    '63 Avanti R2 4 speed

    Leave a comment:


  • Gunslinger
    replied
    In Andy Granatelli's autobiography "They Call Me Mister 500", he related how they determined the problems with superchargers. He determined that there were minute differences in diameter between planetary balls from different lots, and they were randomly being installed during assembly. That meant that planetary balls of greater diameter were carrying a greater share of the load and failing early.

    Andy saw to it that increased quality control measures were initiated to ensure identical planetary bas were installed in superchargers. After that the problems went away.

    Whether that's your problem I can't say, but it's a starting place to look.




    Poet...Mystic...Soldier of Fortune. As always...self-absorbed, adversarial, cocky and in general a malcontent.

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  • Thomas63R2
    started a topic Why superchargers fail

    Why superchargers fail

    I used the search feature and found plenty on superchargers - but nothing technical about what goes bad beyond flatspotting on the drive balls.

    I was having a great Studebaker weekend when my supercharger seized up as I was doing 70 mph on the freeway. To silence the squealing I took it out of gear (4 speed manual), and the engine quit running - probably because of the drag from two non-rotating supercharger drive belts. Of course the loss of power brakes made for some momentary stopping fun. I was right at my exit, and I coasted all the way off the freeway and into a safe low traffic spot on a side street. Popped the hood and smoke was coming out the air filter and carb bonnet, but no fire. I left and got some tools and took the belts off and I was back on the road again.

    The supercharger is seized, still has fluid but it is all dark now (it was freshly filled two weeks ago). The pulley will rock back and forth but will not turn.

    What have you guys found when you disassembled a seized supercharger?

    Thomas

    Long time hot rodder
    Packrat junk collector
    '63 Avanti R2 4 speed
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