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  • boring stude v-8

    what is the max bore on an 1956 289 v-8? how about a 63 R-1 v-8?

    has anyone sleeved a 298 block to accept a 4 inch sleeve?there seems like there is room but would like to talk to some one who has sleeved a stude.

  • #2
    Go over and visit Sonny's Racing Studebakers site..
    http://www.racingstudebakers.com/stl...n/bb/index.php
    There's some pic's of a 4" bore sleeved engine being built there...
    http://www.racingstudebakers.com/stl...pic.php?t=1603
    Not for the timid, but it shows some of the gyrations big bore sleeving can bring...

    As to your original question...
    Most Stude 289's can go .060" overbore pretty easily.
    Have seen larger overbores, but you start running into other issues when you go that big...
    Better experts here can get more specific for you.
    HTIH
    Jeff[8D]


    quote:Originally posted by hotrodstude

    what is the max bore on an 1956 289 v-8? how about a 63 R-1 v-8?
    has anyone sleeved a 298 block to accept a 4 inch sleeve?there seems like there is room but would like to talk to some one who has sleeved a stude.
    HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

    Jeff


    Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



    Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

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    • #3
      We're all hoping there is some new technology involved in this effort shown which will make the previously impossible now possible. However, until one runs long and hard and successfully, it is yet to be shown this can be done.

      FWIW, back in the bad old days, I was involved in a couple of projects with boring out the cylinders completely and inserting sleeves. One was a flathead V8 Ford and the other was a SBC. Neither was successful.

      Alan, who posts here, is a certified aircraft welder. He had access to industrial ovens and heat treating. He was never able to make one work either with welding in sleeves.

      Taking out the cylinder walls removes one-half the connecting material in the block. A sleeve pressed in and touching only top and bottom does not add any strength. It is also guaranteed to leak somewhere. Welding around that much cast iron is seldom-to-never successful. We tried furnace-brazing, but could never seal all eight cylinders top and bottom.

      Hoping, but not holding my breath.

      jack vines

      PackardV8
      PackardV8

      Comment


      • #4
        While an interesting thought...what Jack says is so far fact.
        You can see how unstable the block will become in Jeffs picture.

        Getting one to run is one thing.
        Getting one to be reliable, even for drag racing is a huge question mark.

        Mike

        Comment


        • #5
          We used to overbore by 0.060 inch and not go any further. I have run a 289 with a 0.060" overbore very hard and with a S/C and had zero problems. One man's experience. Blocks do vary.

          Gary L.
          Wappinger, NY

          SDC member since 1968
          Studebaker enthusiast much longer
          Gary L.
          Wappinger, NY

          SDC member since 1968
          Studebaker enthusiast much longer

          Comment


          • #6
            3 3/4" but hold your breath. Don't clap out a block just for the biggest bore. If you want to go to 3 3/4" find a block that someone has bored out to R3 size and has worn out.

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