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new keys and lock retainers in the doors a fix

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  • new keys and lock retainers in the doors a fix

    I made two door lock retainers today and saved about $10, enough to buy more important parts I can't make. I measured the broken rusted retainers which I found with a magnet in the inside bottom of the doors on the '52 Commander I am redoing. I used sheet metal scraps from my furnace repairman's shop, ruler, a pointed magic marker, tin snips, hammer and a vise. The retainers work perfectly. I also had keys made for all of the locks which was much cheaper than buying locks elsewhere. I had a friend who grew up on a ranch in Colorado and he said, "We learned to make it, because town was 50 miles away"......Brad

  • #2
    Speaking of keys, I once had a lock and no key but also had a key that inserted correctly, but didn't fit otherwise. So rather than have a locksmith make a key fit the lock, I made the cylinder fit the key. I removed the cylinder, stuck the key in and filed the little brass pins down until they were flush with the cylinder. Worked like a charm and the cost was hard to beat.

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    • #3
      My Hawk came with the most unusual door & ignition key imaginable - made from a thin knife blade. It has no groves at all, but operates the lock mechanism as it should.
      /H

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      • #4
        quote:Originally posted by John Kirchhoff

        Speaking of keys, I once had a lock and no key but also had a key that inserted correctly, but didn't fit otherwise. So rather than have a locksmith make a key fit the lock, I made the cylinder fit the key. I removed the cylinder, stuck the key in and filed the little brass pins down until they were flush with the cylinder. Worked like a charm and the cost was hard to beat.
        I did that many years ago too (well, actually had a locksmith do it). I had an ugly aftermarket ignition switch in my '53, but had the original Hurd door lock key. I took a stock ignition switch from a junker and had a locksmith re-do the tumblers (pins) to fit the key. So, I have a key that works both the ignition and door just like it came from the factory.



        [img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/R-4.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64L.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64P.jpg[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/53K.jpg[/img=right]Paul Johnson
        '53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
        '64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
        '64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
        Museum R-4 engine
        Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
        '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

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