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Warped spare windshield, can I fix it?

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  • warrlaw1
    replied
    How will I explain what I'm doing to my staff? (lol). Oh, Oh, you're lawyer's having a relapse!

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  • 62SY4
    replied
    Adding to what has been said, old glass was wavy; It takes a ton of heat to 'bend' glass. Most new plate glass comes from the float glass process. Where the compounds that make up the glass are heated until liquid and poured through a canal and allowed to "float" on top of molten tin until nearly solid and then sheared. About 5 years ago I had the chance to tour the local Guardian glass plant, where they manufacture plate glass. The process is very similar to the continuous casting process utilized in steel manufacturing. Back to glass, Part of the quality control when making float glass involves placing cooled plates on a special turn table and viewing them from a distance with a high contrast (think zebra stripes) background. This process shows the wavy imperfections. Next time you have the chance look through a large flat piece of glass where your angle of incidence approaches 90 degrees, that is, lay your cheek on the glass and try to look through it as far ahead of you as possible. This will show the waves.

    Jon Krimm
    1962 Lark Sedan

    1961 Champ

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  • N8N
    replied
    some really old glass had waves in it out of the factory. it wasn't until 70-80 years ago or so that really super-flat, clear glass was inexpensively available. My grandparents had an old farmhouse that was built in the late 1800s and it was obvious when a window pane had been replaced, the new glass had much less distortion than the original. (and a few had to be replaced; sadly, there was an open-pit coal mine, AKA strip mine operation only a mile or so away back in the 70's and 80's. I bet they were overjoyed about that, having owned the property for 30-some years at that point.)

    nate

    --
    55 Commander Starlight
    http://members.cox.net/njnagel

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  • TX Rebel
    replied
    I would to take a field trip to a plate glass factory to see how it is done!

    Barry'd in Studes

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  • JDP
    replied
    There is no proof that glass even 1000 years old has flowed:

    Conclusion

    There is no clear answer to the question "Is glass solid or liquid?". In terms of molecular dynamics and thermodynamics it is possible to justify various different views that it is a highly viscous liquid, an amorphous solid, or simply that glass is another state of matter that is neither liquid nor solid. The difference is semantic. In terms of its material properties we can do little better. There is no clear definition of the distinction between solids and highly viscous liquids. All such phases or states of matter are idealisations of real material properties. Nevertheless, from a more common sense point of view, glass should be considered a solid since it is rigid according to everyday experience. The use of the term "supercooled liquid" to describe glass still persists, but is considered by many to be an unfortunate misnomer that should be avoided. In any case, claims that glass panes in old windows have deformed due to glass flow have never been substantiated. Examples of Roman glassware and calculations based on measurements of glass visco-properties indicate that these claims cannot be true. The observed features are more easily explained as a result of the imperfect methods used to make glass window panes before the float glass process was invented.


    JDP/Maryland

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  • tutone63
    replied
    I too have heard that glass is a liquid. I read some of the report posted by Gary, but I have read other reports saying it is liquid as well. I live in a 100 year old house, and the glass actually has 'waves' from where it looks like it is running down toward the ground.

    I have also seen many times in glass, where it will crack, and develop bubbles...how does that work if it isn't a liquid?




    1963 Lark, 259 V8, two-tone paint, Twin Traction. Driven often, always noticed!

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  • warrlaw1
    replied
    All's well that end's well, but I also heard what 55s heard. I have a 100 year old door and don't want to break it apart to measure the thickness of the panes. It does seem to have some travel downwards, though. What was once a smooth pane now has a current of displacement much like a slowly moving river, all heading downward. Anyone measured an old pane?

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  • silverhawk
    replied
    I took some mesurements, and it isn't warped![:I] Sorry, it sure looked warped!

    Dylan Wills

    '61 lark deluxe 4 door wagon

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  • silverhawk
    replied
    Thanks, I'll look into it just looking funny, that is a definate possibility.

    Dylan Wills

    '61 lark deluxe 4 door wagon

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  • garyash
    replied
    It isn't likely that a windshield sitting around in the basement, even with heavy things stored on it, can change its shape. When they bent the windshield to form it, it was heated to 1100 degrees F or more. The glass is not a crystal but it is stiff enough at normal temperatures that it will break long before it can be permanently deformed.

    Can you make a template of the curvature of the windshield in your car and check it against the spare? It may just look funny when it's not in a car.

    We need to get Mythbusters onto the legend of the old stained glass windows being thicker at the bottom because they sagged over time. Even 1000 years isn't long enough to have this happen. Old glass wasn't uniform thickness to start with and this may be the real story.
    See this: http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/physic...ass/glass.html

    [img=left]http://www.studegarage.com/images/indy/gary_indycar25_vvsm.jpg[/img=left] Gary Ash
    Dartmouth, Mass.
    '32 Indy car replica (in progress)
    '48 M5
    '65 Wagonaire Commander
    '63 Wagonaire Standard
    web site at http://www.studegarage.com

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  • 55s
    replied
    I was surprised to find out many years ago that glass is a liquid.

    Old glass panes are thicker at the bottom than at the top.

    I am sure it will curve back, but you will have to be very, very patient.

    You might consider making a "buck" - make a plaster mold from the back of a good windshield, then use it to store the deformed one.

    I hate throwing stuff away, but storing stuff so you can find it, and keeping it usable, can be an even bigger PITA. We have been so lucky with all of our parts vendors, who have cheap replacement stuff when our badly stored stuff is unusable.

    Paul

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  • leyrret
    replied
    Hang it somewhere exposed to heat such as somewhere in direct sunlight. This also a good idea when installing as it is much more flexible which lessen chance of cracking.

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  • 52-fan
    replied
    This is a new one on me, but assuming the warp is due, at least in part, to the lamination allowing some slight movement, hanging over the trusses for a time might work.


    1952 Champion Starlight, 1962 Daytona, both w/overdrive.Searcy,Arkansas
    "I may be lazy, but I'm not shiftless."

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  • silverhawk
    started a topic Warped spare windshield, can I fix it?

    Warped spare windshield, can I fix it?

    Hi all,

    I was cleaning out our basement today (scary), and I pulled out our spare '61-62 windshield, wich we pulled out of a parts car 6-8 years ago. It was laying on its side, with the curves up in the air, with a few things inside it, and it has gotten alot of headway flattening![}] Is there a long term way to re-arc this windshield? It is a pretty darn nice one, so I would like to save it if possible. I was thinking maybe I could store it with the curves hanging down by some open roof trusses we got, but wondering if it is even possible to save it. If not, guess we learned a good, and possibly a exspensive, lesson.

    Thanks,

    Dylan Wills

    '61 lark deluxe 4 door wagon
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