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Brakes 101 redux

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  • Brakes 101 redux

    My buddy Joe looked at my '64's front brakes this week while I was out-of-town, and says he thinks it would be wise for me to get new drums because they have 'hot spots' and he's not sure at this point if they can be resurfaced. He asked me to post here, too, to ask "..the maximum you can cut the drum; need the spec."

    Can anybody answer this?

    I remember hearing that either front, or back, drums are NLA; true? I did a search and could not find that thread.

    Car has drum brakes all around, non-power.

    Recall that the car was pulling right when braking and also LF and RR wheel covers were hot to the touch after a ten-or-twelve mile high-speed run. Dual m/c rear-brake 'compartment' is half-full. Joe says the front wheel bearings also need repacked (insufficient grease).

    I believe we are going to do drums, shoes, cylinders, and flexible hoses, as well as repack wheel bearings. (Joe has yet to look at the rears...has to borrow a puller...but I had told him earlier I would like them repacked as just something I'd like done).

    Can anyone advise on how 'down' drums can be cut, and if new front and rear ones are available?

    Goal is still a car show 75 miles away in the town the car was sold new, and where the original owners still live and wish to see the car, on July 4...but I'm aware time is dwindling!

    Thanks,
    Bill Pressler
    Kent, OH
    '63 Lark Daytona Skytop R1
    '64 Daytona Hardtop
    Bill Pressler
    Kent, OH
    (formerly Greenville, PA)
    Currently owned: 1966 Cruiser, Timberline Turquoise, 26K miles
    Formerly owned: 1963 Lark Daytona Skytop R1, Ermine White
    1964 Daytona Hardtop, Strato Blue
    1966 Daytona Sports Sedan, Niagara Blue Mist
    All are in Australia now

  • #2
    Usually the max DOT/FMVSS/OE spec is .060" max
    (11.060" for example).
    Hot spots are a tougher issue.
    Sometimes, you can find a real machine shop with old equipment that might have a diamond grinding stone grinder meant to do just this.
    I had one for the AMMCO brake drum lathe I cut my teeth on, and hardly ever used it.
    HTIH...
    Jeff[8D]


    quote:Originally posted by Bill Pressler

    My buddy Joe looked at my '64's front brakes this week while I was out-of-town, and says he thinks it would be wise for me to get new drums because they have 'hot spots' and he's not sure at this point if they can be resurfaced. He asked me to post here, too, to ask "..the maximum you can cut the drum; need the spec."

    Can anybody answer this?

    <snip>
    HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

    Jeff


    Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



    Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

    Comment


    • #3
      Well, I see that SI charges $200 per front drum, and doesn't have rear drums. SASCO has no inventory on SI's part number for front drums. Sheesh!

      Bill Pressler
      Kent, OH
      '63 Lark Daytona Skytop R1
      '64 Daytona Hardtop
      Bill Pressler
      Kent, OH
      (formerly Greenville, PA)
      Currently owned: 1966 Cruiser, Timberline Turquoise, 26K miles
      Formerly owned: 1963 Lark Daytona Skytop R1, Ermine White
      1964 Daytona Hardtop, Strato Blue
      1966 Daytona Sports Sedan, Niagara Blue Mist
      All are in Australia now

      Comment


      • #4
        What Jeff said, Bill.

        Keep in mind, you aren't going to drive this car daily. If they take the drums out to the max and there is still a hard spot or two, the brakes won't be perfect, but they'll be safe. And when new drums are $400 a pair plus shipping, is it that important the brakes have a super-smooth pedal (i.e., no pulsating) for occasional use?

        (I.e., I know you are sensitive about pulsating brake pedals on contemporary, daily-driven, disc-brake cars, but part of the "charm" of old cars is putting up with some of their quirks as long as they're safe.)

        You'll just have to get those rear drums off and see what they're like as well. If you absolutely must have replacements, it's a hard part that used-part vendors should be able to supply.

        Good luck! Remember, we're having fun![8D] BP
        We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

        Ayn Rand:
        "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

        G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

        Comment


        • #5
          One thing I want to emphasize is that if a drum has hot or hard spots they can indeed be ground down with a brake lathe attachment, like Jeff said,utilizing a stone wheel leveled with a diamond cutter.Done it many times. The problem is that eventually the hot or hard spots will return as the drum wears because those hot spots will not wear down like the rest of the drum surface. Consequently the brakes will grab again. This has been my experience while doing brake work for 40 years.
          Frank van Doorn
          Omaha, Ne.
          1962 GT Hawk 289 4 speed
          1941 Champion streetrod, R-2 Powered, GM 200-4R trans.
          1952 V-8 232 Commander State "Starliner" hardtop OD

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