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  • cause? R-1

    Any thoughts concerning why my Avanti backfired through the carb when attempting to restart a hot engine after stopping for food on the highway?....Backfired only one time, but was hard starting the rest of the day with a very hot engine.

    thoughts???

  • #2
    Does it still have the Prestolite distributor? My first guess would be the advance weights had hung up and trying to start with full advance.

    Second guess, since it was a hot day, would be percolation of fuel flooding the intake. Once the plugs are fouled with today's fuel additives, they may never really clear up.

    thnx, jack vines

    PackardV8
    PackardV8

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    • #3
      Another possibility would be an intake valve that hung open.

      Gary L.
      Wappinger, NY

      SDC member since 1968
      Studebaker enthusiast much longer
      Gary L.
      Wappinger, NY

      SDC member since 1968
      Studebaker enthusiast much longer

      Comment


      • #4
        If you haven't had any problems in the past...might have been something as simple a a small bit of unburnt fuel in the chamber...as soon as a spark hit it with the intake valve starting to open...bang, a little pop.

        What does "hard starting" mean..?
        Spins (turns over) but won't try to start.?
        Spins, trys to start, but doesn't.?
        Spins slowly.?
        Doens't spin evenly.?

        Most likely nothing to worry about.

        But in all...could be many causes...go back to my very first comment (problems in the past).

        Mike

        Comment


        • #5
          Percolating fuel can bubble up and dribble out of the carb and lay in the bottom of the intake. It could cause the pop and also make the car hard to start.

          Get it hot and look down the throat of the carb at the venturi clusters.

          If that is the case first step might be to block the crossover in the intake manifold.

          ErnieR


          On its way to a 15.097 Spring 2006.

          Comment


          • #6
            After the car sat for three weeks, it was a beech to start! I began to run the battery down and had to hook up a 250amp booster to the battery.....engine spun over like a champ....but would not start....finally had to employ starting fluid into the carb intake with the choke valve held open with a wrench. Thereafter very hard to re-start with a hot engine.....I guess todays fuel is the cause....when I fill tank with 110 TEL laced fuel this problem is reduced.......but not totally eliminated.....since the car is never operated in the winter, should I revove the heat riser valve from the exhaust?

            Comment


            • #7
              First order of business is new spark plugs. Doesn't matter how recent or how good they look, install new plugs. If this fixes the problem, it's the easiest, cheapest fix you could hope for.

              Removing the exhaust heat riser, unless it is stuck closed, won't change anything. If the car is only summer driven, blocking the exhaust crossover at the intake manifold using two 1/16" stainless plates is what you are looking for.

              thnx, jack vines

              PackardV8
              PackardV8

              Comment


              • #8
                I find that the longer mine sits the more effort is required to start it. And I'm sure that it is related the fuel today. So, anytime it sit's longer than a week, it gets a short spritz of starting fluid before I ever crank it. Then it fires right up.

                Besides what other's said, you may also want to check the timing and dwell to see if your ignition is dialed in.

                ========================
                63 Avanti R2, 4-Speed, 3.73 TT
                Martinez, CA

                Comment


                • #9
                  Jack,

                  Why new plugs? If the car does start and then run at 60-70 mph on the highway wouln't that burn the crud off the plugs?



                  quote:Originally posted by PackardV8

                  First order of business is new spark plugs. Doesn't matter how recent or how good they look, install new plugs. If this fixes the problem, it's the easiest, cheapest fix you could hope for.

                  Removing the exhaust heat riser, unless it is stuck closed, won't change anything. If the car is only summer driven, blocking the exhaust crossover at the intake manifold using two 1/16" stainless plates is what you are looking for.

                  thnx, jack vines

                  PackardV8

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    What about the metal intake gaskets?


                    quote:Originally posted by PackardV8

                    First order of business is new spark plugs. Doesn't matter how recent or how good they look, install new plugs. If this fixes the problem, it's the easiest, cheapest fix you could hope for.

                    Removing the exhaust heat riser, unless it is stuck closed, won't change anything. If the car is only summer driven, blocking the exhaust crossover at the intake manifold using two 1/16" stainless plates is what you are looking for.

                    thnx, jack vines

                    PackardV8

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Just remember, if you do block the heat crossover, you MUST remove (or wire open) the heat riser valve.
                      As far as the steel intake gaskets?
                      I don't use the steel ones.
                      I get mine from Meyer's Studebaker in Duncan Falls, Ohio.
                      (nice material)..
                      Then cut small stainless steel plates and block the ports on the head side of the gasket.
                      I like to apply Permatex Ultra Copper gasket sealant to the intake manifold and then apply the intake gasket.

                      Put a small film of Ultra Copper on the intake gasket at the heat crossover and glue the stainless block off plate to the gasket.
                      Let it set up overnight.

                      The next day, apply a small film of chassis grease to the intake gasket surface.
                      Mount the intake using the Stude sequence and torque.
                      This way, the intake can come off a few times without killing the intake gasket (an old drag racer trick)..
                      The steel gaskets are a one time use gasket and are designed for the initial install..
                      Mixing heads and intakes, as well as surfacing blocks makes it hard for the steel gaskets to cope...
                      HTIH
                      Jeff[8D]

                      quote:Originally posted by PackardV8

                      First order of business is new spark plugs. Doesn't matter how recent or how good they look, install new plugs. If this fixes the problem, it's the easiest, cheapest fix you could hope for.

                      Removing the exhaust heat riser, unless it is stuck closed, won't change anything. If the car is only summer driven, blocking the exhaust crossover at the intake manifold using two 1/16" stainless plates is what you are looking for.

                      thnx, jack vines

                      PackardV8
                      HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

                      Jeff


                      Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



                      Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Jeff
                        There have been several posts regarding the composite gaskets.
                        We should open up the discussion again and see what the consensus is.
                        Many new people have joined in since that and may give some insight.
                        Robert Kapteyn

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I searched and found three threads on gaskets.
                          Saw your reply in this one...
                          http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...intake,gaskets
                          I do not agree with your assessment of heat retention causing failures, but that's OK..
                          Which ones (gaskets) do you stock and sell?
                          I do not seek concensus.
                          I operate from experience and results.
                          But, if you want to toss it out for forum discussion...Go right ahead.
                          I'm game to learn new tricks too[]
                          Jeff[8D]


                          quote:Originally posted by rkapteyn

                          Jeff
                          There have been several posts regarding the composite gaskets.
                          We should open up the discussion again and see what the consensus is.
                          Many new people have joined in since that and may give some insight.
                          Robert Kapteyn


                          http://community.webshots.com/user/deepnhock
                          HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

                          Jeff


                          Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



                          Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            This is what is so good about this forum.
                            Discussion without flaming.
                            I had hoped for more posts on experienced people have had.
                            That is how we learn.
                            I opened this up as a new thread.
                            Bob

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