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Old fashion fibrous wheel bearing grease source?

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  • Dwain G.
    replied
    quote:
    However, I'm ready top believe that I must have screwed up in my wheel bearing packing job. Maybe I did tighten the bearing too much[V].

    Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia. '64 Daytona
    Regardless of whatever tightening procedure one uses, do this test at the end of the job. Put a screwdriver blade against the edge of the washer behind the axle nut and push or twist the blade. The washer should move side to side with a small amount of resistance. It should not fall freely, nor require a tight grip on the screwdriver handle.
    The adjustment is easier to accomplish if you replace the axle nut with one of those 'HELP' kits that has a plain nut and a castellated cap for the nut.


    HEY, you're not Wilbur!

    Leave a comment:


  • 53k
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by BobPalma

    Paul, was the Tractor Supply red grease you were using marketed by Champion Lubricants, their UPC 43685-41498? If so, I doubt it failed. I am just now finishing up a full container of it and use it exclusively for all types of wheels bearings. No problems or failures, and this is over probably five years with dozens of different vehicles. BP
    This is the TSC red grease I used. I can't find anything indicating the manufacturer.



    This is the type of grease I was looking for (I did find this old can which is still about 1/3 full). While you can't read it in the picture, it has the words "Wheel Bearing" stenciled in the white area below "Quaker". I guess it isn't really fibrous, just very thick.



    However, I'm ready top believe that I must have screwed up in my wheel bearing packing job. Maybe I did tighten the bearing too much[V].




    Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia. '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Daytona convertible, '53 Commander Starliner, Museum R-4 engine, '62 Gravely Model L, '72 Gravely Model 430

    Leave a comment:


  • Clem64
    replied
    I agree with Bams. While it seems simple enough to just tighten the axle nut and be done with it, it's not. Shop manuals vary a bit on the proceedure, but basically they achieve the same proper result. I put the drum back on the axle (with bearing,washer,nut), put the wheel+tire back on the drum, spin the wheel and while spinning tighten the axle nut to just a couple of foot pounds. Then with the wheel stationary, back off the axle nut one turn and check the runout. There should be a slight detectable amount of play when you grasp the tire and wiggle it. Put the cotter key (a new one) in place, replace the end cup and your done. In time, experience will give you a feel for the right amount of runout. Remember, when it comes to wheel bearings it's bettter to be slightly loose than slightly tight.

    Dean Croft
    Roseburg,OR

    CLEM DESEE

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  • bams50
    replied
    I'm surprised at so many suggestions about grease, when it's so easy to overtighten wheel bearings if you're not careful. I bet that was the cause, Paul, even with your experience; easy to do. IMO, not so easy to blame grease- they're all pretty good in my experience.

    Robert (Bob) Andrews- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys)
    Parish, central NY 13131






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  • fmarshall
    replied
    I somewhat concur with the boat trailer bearing grease. Bear in mind that most trailers see only seasonal use, traveling way less miles than most autos. And they should get repacked yearly, for the aforementioned reasons.

    ========================
    63 Avanti R2, 4-Speed, 3.73 TT
    Martinez, CA

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  • 31Streetrod
    replied
    In my humble opinion, the best grease I have found as a substitute for the old grease is the wheel bearing grease formulated and marketed for use on wheel bearings in boat trailers. Stop and think about it for a minute, boat trailer wheels are submerged in water and a large percentage are small diameter wheels turning higher revs than the tow vehicle thus generating more heat and more load on the bearing. Ain't had no problems with this grease. It stays where you put it and does what you expect it to. [^]

    Lost in the 50's

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  • BobPalma
    replied
    Paul, was the Tractor Supply red grease you were using marketed by Champion Lubricants, their UPC 43685-41498? If so, I doubt it failed. I am just now finishing up a full container of it and use it exclusively for all types of wheels bearings. No problems or failures, and this is over probably five years with dozens of different vehicles. BP

    Leave a comment:


  • fmarshall
    replied
    Use this stuff:

    http://www.farm-home.com/mn/t7_ssidi...27-8008~~~~~~~

    ========================
    63 Avanti R2, 4-Speed, 3.73 TT
    Martinez, CA

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  • 1962larksedan
    replied
    Something to remember is that disc brake bearings tend to run hotter as it is........meaning that such grease used on a drum brake vehicle should be OK.

    Although; as several of the above posters stated-----------cleanliness is next to Godliness where wheel bearings are concerned since different types of grease do not usually 'play well together'

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Borrowed Bams50's sigline here:

    "Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"

    Leave a comment:


  • N8N
    replied
    yup, never switch greases without a good cleaning first.

    I've been running Redline CV-2 in the 944 for years... don't remember how many. Repacked the bearings once as PM a little while after getting the car and haven't touched them since. They're still fine, but that's really not a ringing endorsement because I think I've only lost two wheel bearings in my entire life (one VW rear outer and... well... ALL of 'em on my F-150, but that was the PO's doing.) I've since switched to Mobil 1 simply because my FLAPS doesn't carry Redline products, and I figure Mobil 1 is sold just about everywhere, so I can always get the exact same grease if I need some on the road. Haven't driven any car so packed far enough to give it a thumbs up or down. Ask me in a few tens of thousands of miles...

    'course new cars all have those sealed bearing thingys... sure you don't ever have to repack 'em but you WILL have to replace 'em someday... not sure how I feel about that. I kind of like being able to shoot some fresh grease in them and take up a little slack and keep on truckin' - total cost, some red goo and a wheel seal (if I choose not to reuse the old one - you can do that if you knock it out with the inner bearing. Manual says no, and I wouldn't recommend it to anyone, but I've done it and gotten away with it)

    nate

    --
    55 Commander Starlight
    http://members.cox.net/njnagel

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  • Lark Parker
    replied
    A mechanical engineer advised me to not "mix" the greases, particularly with the "new" lithium greases.
    He said that they would form a hard compound.

    He spent a lot of company time going to dinner with the
    lubricant vendors so he may have learned something.

    This advice was directed at the grease gun additions as the wheel bearings would have the old grease cleaned out anyhow.

    I've never had a problem with the red grease.

    LP

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  • hotrodstude
    replied
    that is true put i was in a maintance unit(562nd lmc and 145th engineers) and we were always replacing the wheel bearings. al most 100 percent failure rate we switched over to regular wheel grease and had no more failures.it may work in a cold climit but not in thailand.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bud
    replied
    I've been using Pennzoil # 707 heavy duty red grease for years in wheel bearings, both drum and disc brake and I haven't had any bearing failures due to improper lubrication. As far as I can see, the new grease stays in the bearings far longer than the old fiber type grease. Bud

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  • Transtar60
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by hotrodstude

    is the military grease "automotive,artillery" if it is don't use it on wheel bearings it was designed for the wear strips on artillery pieces.
    That's weird. In the Army we used it on everything from tank roadwheel bearings, deuce and half and jeep wheel bearings and everything else.


    3E38
    4E2
    4E28
    5E13
    7E7
    8E7
    8E12
    8E28

    59 Lark
    etc

    Leave a comment:


  • 53k
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by Dan Timberlake

    I might have an old can kicking around someplace.
    What brand failed? Sounds like one wheel, how does the other wheel look and feel? How do the parts look? Outer bearing only? Generally rough, blue and burnt, cage worn thin and broken. ???
    I have a hard time believing a quality name brand would not out-perform the old stuff in every way.
    If the initial setting ended up very tight, I would not expect the bearings to survive extended highway running.
    The brand I used on the failed bearing was Tractor Supply generic. The tube said recommended for disc and drum brake wheel bearings. The bearing that seized was the outer right. I removed all the bearings and replaced them with new. The other three old bearings looked ok. I packed the new bearings with the last of my old fibrous Quaker State wheel bearing grease.
    It's possible that the bearing was going bad already and I could have run it too tight. I do a lot of dumb things anymore.
    The NAPA man I talked to yesterday recommended Lucas grease in a tube for grease guns (also red, but guarenteed anti-sieze). Maybe I'll try it next time.




    Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia. '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Daytona convertible, '53 Commander Starliner, Museum R-4 engine, '62 Gravely Model L, '72 Gravely Model 430

    Leave a comment:

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