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Old fashion fibrous wheel bearing grease source?

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  • #16
    I'm surprised at so many suggestions about grease, when it's so easy to overtighten wheel bearings if you're not careful. I bet that was the cause, Paul, even with your experience; easy to do. IMO, not so easy to blame grease- they're all pretty good in my experience.

    Robert (Bob) Andrews- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys)
    Parish, central NY 13131






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    • #17
      I agree with Bams. While it seems simple enough to just tighten the axle nut and be done with it, it's not. Shop manuals vary a bit on the proceedure, but basically they achieve the same proper result. I put the drum back on the axle (with bearing,washer,nut), put the wheel+tire back on the drum, spin the wheel and while spinning tighten the axle nut to just a couple of foot pounds. Then with the wheel stationary, back off the axle nut one turn and check the runout. There should be a slight detectable amount of play when you grasp the tire and wiggle it. Put the cotter key (a new one) in place, replace the end cup and your done. In time, experience will give you a feel for the right amount of runout. Remember, when it comes to wheel bearings it's bettter to be slightly loose than slightly tight.

      Dean Croft
      Roseburg,OR

      CLEM DESEE
      Dean




      CLEM

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      • #18
        quote:Originally posted by BobPalma

        Paul, was the Tractor Supply red grease you were using marketed by Champion Lubricants, their UPC 43685-41498? If so, I doubt it failed. I am just now finishing up a full container of it and use it exclusively for all types of wheels bearings. No problems or failures, and this is over probably five years with dozens of different vehicles. BP
        This is the TSC red grease I used. I can't find anything indicating the manufacturer.



        This is the type of grease I was looking for (I did find this old can which is still about 1/3 full). While you can't read it in the picture, it has the words "Wheel Bearing" stenciled in the white area below "Quaker". I guess it isn't really fibrous, just very thick.



        However, I'm ready top believe that I must have screwed up in my wheel bearing packing job. Maybe I did tighten the bearing too much[V].




        Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia. '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Daytona convertible, '53 Commander Starliner, Museum R-4 engine, '62 Gravely Model L, '72 Gravely Model 430

        Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
        '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

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        • #19
          quote:
          However, I'm ready top believe that I must have screwed up in my wheel bearing packing job. Maybe I did tighten the bearing too much[V].

          Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia. '64 Daytona
          Regardless of whatever tightening procedure one uses, do this test at the end of the job. Put a screwdriver blade against the edge of the washer behind the axle nut and push or twist the blade. The washer should move side to side with a small amount of resistance. It should not fall freely, nor require a tight grip on the screwdriver handle.
          The adjustment is easier to accomplish if you replace the axle nut with one of those 'HELP' kits that has a plain nut and a castellated cap for the nut.


          HEY, you're not Wilbur!
          "Burning Bridges...Lost Forevermore"......

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