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The Correct PCV Valve for R1 and R2

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  • Engine: The Correct PCV Valve for R1 and R2

    The 1562731 PCV Valve allows the correct amount of restricted flow to the Carb. (vacuum) and BLOCKS ALL FLOW from the Carb. (Backfire/Pressure)


    It does rattle, probably has no spring, and seats (closes) on a tapered seat like a Carb. Float Needle in the hose end, and when Vacuum is present it restricts flow to the space space between the three flat sides of the needle & the tube.

    FYI: Just to set the record straight to prevent anyone from damaging their engine, from my experience and to my knowledge this is how it works, and what it looks like.

    StudeRich
    StudeRich
    Second Generation Stude Driver,
    Proud '54 Starliner Owner
    SDC Member Since 1967

  • #2
    Thanks for this information. As I get closer to an operable GT Hawk I'll verify this is what I have, and it's condition. There is something that a hose goes to in the back of the carb. Now I know what it should look like.

    Perry
    '23 Special Six,
    '50 Business Champ,
    '50 Starlight Champ,
    '60 Lark droptop,
    '63 GT R1
    Perry
    \'50 Business Champion
    \'50 Starlight Champion
    \'60 Lark Convertible,
    \'63 GT R1,
    \'67 Triumph TR4A

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    • #3
      I have never bothered to find a correct Stude PCV valve when installing a PCV system. I think the one I used on the E7 pickup was for a inline Chevy 6 from the mid 60's. I know that in a perfect world you should match the PCV valve to the amount of vaccum the engine pulls, but for most of us that isn't really all that important, is it? Or am I totally wrong on this?

      I have yet to hook up the PCV system on the '64 R1 engine in my '56. I am running a late Carter AFB (the ones that are exactly the same as the Edelbrock version). How would you install a PCV valve in this setup?

      Comment


      • #4

        Whatever PCV you use, it's been attested to by Carter (carbs) that the PCV hose should NOT be inserted in the rear of the carb if you have a 4 barrel (at least if you have an original AFB). According to their investigation into complaints about fouled plugs, they found that the rear barrels do not operate enough to evacuate condensed oil vapors that can get trapped in the hose. Then, when you get into it and the rear barrels open, they dump the oil into the rear cylinders and can foul the plugs...

        ref: <http://www.studebaker-info.org/text3/pcvhose.txt>


        Bob Johnstone
        www.studebaker-info.org

        64 GT Hawk
        55 President State Sedan
        70 Avanti (R3)
        64 GT Hawk (K7)
        1970 Avanti (R3)

        Comment


        • #5
          I just can't buy into that statement, even if it came from Carter. The reason why is, the PCV is connected at the rear of the carburator below the trottle plates and therefore is subjected to manifold vacuum constantly. This place at the rear of the carb is where Studebaker attached the PCV originally when the cars were built.


          quote:Originally posted by 55Prez


          Whatever PCV you use, it's been attested to by Carter (carbs) that the PCV hose should NOT be inserted in the rear of the carb if you have a 4 barrel (at least if you have an original AFB). According to their investigation into complaints about fouled plugs, they found that the rear barrels do not operate enough to evacuate condensed oil vapors that can get trapped in the hose. Then, when you get into it and the rear barrels open, they dump the oil into the rear cylinders and can foul the plugs...

          ref: <http://www.studebaker-info.org/text3/pcvhose.txt>


          Bob Johnstone
          www.studebaker-info.org

          64 GT Hawk
          55 President State Sedan
          70 Avanti (R3)
          Frank van Doorn
          Omaha, Ne.
          1962 GT Hawk 289 4 speed
          1941 Champion streetrod, R-2 Powered, GM 200-4R trans.
          1952 V-8 232 Commander State "Starliner" hardtop OD

          Comment


          • #6
            let that be a lesson to you, make sure that you actuate the secondaries on a regular basis. Save your plugs!

            nate

            --
            55 Commander Starlight
            http://members.cox.net/njnagel
            --
            55 Commander Starlight
            http://members.cox.net/njnagel

            Comment


            • #7
              Click image for larger version

Name:	P3030054.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	33.5 KB
ID:	1682923This is everything that's inside the R2 PCV valve. The piece that looks like a carb float is staked into the body. It is basically a check valve.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by 63 R2 Hawk View Post
                [ATTACH=CONFIG]25867[/ATTACH]This is everything that's inside the R2 PCV valve. The piece that looks like a carb float is staked into the body. It is basically a check valve.
                Thanks for this photo. What size is the orfice where the needle sits in? Thanks

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                • #9
                  It's around 3/16
                  Bez Auto Alchemy
                  573-318-8948
                  http://bezautoalchemy.com


                  "Don't believe every internet quote" Abe Lincoln

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                  • #10
                    StudeRich, the early Avantis, noted in the 1st issue of the parts manual, used part no. 1557845. Any idea as to the difference. Both appear identical. I'm using the early one.
                    I suspect that the difference is in the orifice size. I can gauge the early part but don't have the later one to compare. Check yours with a number drill and I'll do the same.

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                    • #11
                      Finally remembered to gauge the #1557845 pcv valve. A #50 drill shank measured at .069" passes the orifice. A #49 drill shank at .072" doesn't. The orifice is between .070-.071". What is it for the 1562731?

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by WCP View Post
                        Finally remembered to gauge the #1557845 pcv valve. A #50 drill shank measured at .069" passes the orifice. A #49 drill shank at .072" doesn't. The orifice is between .070-.071". What is it for the 1562731?
                        Sorry, I can't get to the one and only NOS 1562731 PCV Valve I have right now, it's installed in my R1 Powered '61 Cruiser now and it is not at home. I'll try to check it later when I am at the other property where it is.
                        StudeRich
                        Second Generation Stude Driver,
                        Proud '54 Starliner Owner
                        SDC Member Since 1967

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by 63 R2 Hawk View Post
                          [ATTACH=CONFIG]25867[/ATTACH]This is everything that's inside the R2 PCV valve. The piece that looks like a carb float is staked into the body. It is basically a check valve.
                          Studebaker never called it a PCV valve, they called it a "check valve". The parts book does not show a picture of it, only the name call out and p/n.

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                          • #14
                            I see the Studebaker Part number for the correct PCV Valve listed in these posts, but no mention of a correct replacement from the after market. What is the correct PCV Valve currently available in the after market world for a R1, if anyone knows?
                            Thanks
                            John

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by JLB View Post
                              I see the Studebaker Part number for the correct PCV Valve listed in these posts, but no mention of a correct replacement from the after market. What is the correct PCV Valve currently available in the after market world for a R1, if anyone knows?
                              Thanks
                              John
                              John, these "check valves" never really go bad. They can last forever actually.......just soak them in a good carb cleaner, or in safety clean fluid. As long as you can hear the "jingle-jangle" of the valve when you shake it, you are good to go. Indeed, the valve in my Avanti is over 55 years old.........but is subjected to yearly cleaning with the above mentioned cleaners.

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