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How hard is it to fix front end of '66?

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  • How hard is it to fix front end of '66?

    The garage tells us my brother's '66 V-8 Cruiser 4-dr needs front end work on one side. I don't think it has the typical ball joint/tie-rod arrangement, but something called king-pins. Can someone explain the difference and how hard it would be to locate parts and repair? Is that something SASCO might have? Thanks!
    edp/NC
    \'63 Avanti
    \'66 Commander

  • #2
    the king pins are really old school but i like them. do both sides and replace any other front end parts. then have alinement done, they are not that hard but if you don't know what your doing they can be a pain. do the king pin kits still come with the ream with them or is that separte? good luck i hope i was a little help its been a long time.1965

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    • #3

      Having recently rebuilt the front suspension on my 66 Daytona, I can give ya a step by step process and list of components to properly refurbish your front end. As I've mentioned in another related post, it isn't as daunting a task as the shop manual shows it to be. Much verbage can become confusing. I will stick my neck and highly recommend Delrin "A" arm bushings from Chuck Collins. They are about the same money as original type and are threaded for grease fittings. Metal shelled rubber original type will deteriorate sooner than you'd like. I also wouldn't do one side only as it may not be possible to get everything to align properply.(short cut work gives short cut results) I got lucky when I took the car to alignment shop along with shop manual with factory specs, in that it only needed toe-in set and steering wheel centered. Mechanic spent too much time scratching his head while I kept telling him "it's much much easier than all the late model stuff. It took him way longer to dial in all the specs into alignment computor than it did to do the job. I'm not a pro, just an old time fixer upper and love doing it. If I can be of any help to ya, or offer encouragement, please call me, as my email is down.
      Kim Kramer
      517-960-5832
      EST

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      • #4
        I would have a shop that is experienced with Studebakers look at the front end & see what needs replacing. Alot of shops just throw parts at a job & dont care if a part is still good or not. This especially applies to the king pins. They are the most bullet proof part of the suspention, unless they are really neglected & lack of grease. I remember when I was a kid going to a front end mechanic to have some work done on my 59 Lark as preventive maintainance only to be told "that car has the best suspention out there.....you dont need it so save your money." Usually the only needs are the upper & lower control arm bushings & maybe tie rod ends, since the 66 tie rods didnt have zerk fittings on them from the factory so they didnt get lubed with the rest of things. I agree with kamzack in the delrin bushings too, although some say it gives a slightly harsher ride but I havent been able to find that.

        60 Lark convertible
        61 Champ
        62 Daytona convertible
        63 G.T. R-2,4 speed
        63 Avanti (2)
        66 Daytona Sport Sedan
        59 Lark wagon, now V-8, H.D. auto!
        60 Lark convertible V-8 auto
        61 Champ 1/2 ton 4 speed
        62 Champ 3/4 ton 5 speed o/drive
        62 Champ 3/4 ton auto
        62 Daytona convertible V-8 4 speed & 62 Cruiser, auto.
        63 G.T. Hawk R-2,4 speed
        63 Avanti (2) R-1 auto
        64 Zip Van
        66 Daytona Sport Sedan(327)V-8 4 speed
        66 Cruiser V-8 auto

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