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  • Painting a chassis

    Alright, so I'm going to start a discussion here and I just want to get it straight out. I'm goint to ask about PAINTING a chassis. I do not have the facilities nor the means "ie, cash" to powder coat a chassis.

    That said. I have, as some know, painted my chassis, how ever it seems to me that even with several, and I mean several coats, the paint just does not hold up. So I am asking for advice on application technique, or maybe I just need to go to a diffent brand of paint all together.

    I'm using a Rust-oleum Professional Grade Industrial Enamel over the top of two coats of Rust-Oleum industrial primer. The first coat I did on the chassis was simply with a rattle can, just to get a base down over my primer. But since then I purchase a 1 gallon can and cut it down per directions when ever I've sprayed.

    My delema is the paint still seems soft to me and knicks easy right down to the primer.

    Has anyone used the Chassis Paint offered by Eastwood and other manufactures? Is that stuff sturdy? IE, if I walk by my frame and bump it with my cell phone will the paint chip off?

    Also, I am concerned that maybe the Rust-oleum product doesn't hold up the way it should, nor will it be good in the long run on a chassis.

    I know this isn't rocket science. Heck we use industrial grade paint at work on our heavy equipment, but then again we bake the stuff on, so it doesn't come off that easy. Why the heck is this stuff so soft? It just seems strange.

  • #2
    I feel what ever you use for paint"should be used with a hardner" I have painted small parts with rust-oleum in the past and felt it was'nt tuff enough.

    Joseph R. Zeiger
    Joseph R. Zeiger

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    • #3
      yeah, rust-oleum probably protects against rust well, but it never does get really hard. IT's great stuff for static parts, but for stuff that gets rocks etc. thrown up against it, probably not so much - unless you cover it with a thin layer of undercoat (if you like that look)

      nate

      --
      55 Commander Starlight
      http://members.cox.net/njnagel
      --
      55 Commander Starlight
      http://members.cox.net/njnagel

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      • #4
        Tim, Don't fret over not powder coating your chassis. Powder coating is an electrostatic application process. It has its own problems. Faraday cage effect prevents powder from reaching recesses and crevices that need to be covered. If any grease, road tar, or other contaminants flow from inside frame areas during the baking process, then "out gassing" can occur and create adhesion problems as well. If you have the frame clean, a good epoxy, or etching primer should be sufficient. If you are wanting a pretty shiny frame for show (with mirrors underneath) use a good catalyzed automotive grade gloss black paint. Some of the Rustoleum products are intended to be gummy and flexible, but that makes them susceptible to scrapes and scratches. In the past few years other products I am unfamiliar with have been developed. The problem with coatings that become "rock hard" is that they are often "brittle" and when they crack, they can hold moisture and create an incubator for rust. Look for a product that has "adhesion" but retains enough "flexibility" to take some impact without cracking. The key is to seal out oxygen and moisture. There are others participating on this forum who may have more recent experience than I, so maybe they will contribute. Find a reputable coating supplier in your area and ask for his suggestions as well. Good luck with your project.

        John Clary
        Greer, SC
        [IMG][/IMG]
        I have only two limitations ...BRAINS & ENERGY
        SDC member since 1975
        John Clary
        Greer, SC

        SDC member since 1975

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        • #5
          Ah ok, got it. Thanks guys, I you tube'd painting a chassis and I understand what you are saying. I definately need a catalyzed auto paint. That is definately the issue. Thanks again all!

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