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1960 Delco window distributor question.

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  • 1960 Delco window distributor question.

    Pulled the Delco window dist. out of the '60 Lark to use in my '55. I have a set of Accel points and condenser I bought 30 plus years ago and stashed away that will fit it and I will put an adjustable vacuum canister on it and a curve kit but I have a question regarding the lobes for the point cam. This appears to have a narrow chamfer on one side of each lobe. It appears to be machined in and not from wear as it extends all the way across the lobe not just where the wear block rides. I don't remember this on any of my GM distributors. Is this correct? I might still have one out in the garage to compare to but I sure don't remember anything like that.

    Just checked, have 2 Chevy distributors and neither one has thyis chamfer. It's uniform on all 8 lobes and definitely looks factory.

    Analog man in a digital world.

  • #2
    Here's some pure speculation, Glen; nothing more than a theory. I have no documentation that this might be true:

    Might the chamfer have been placed there as a pocket/reservoir for lubrication in the Studebaker application because Studebaker's distributor rotation is counter-clockwise, as opposed to clockwise for Chevrolets? If that was true, it would explain why your two Chevrolet distributors don't have the chamfer.

    During the era of point ignitions, manufacturers played with all sorts of ideas to provide rubbing-block lubrication and, thus, stabilize dwell over a longer period of time.

    As I said, I have no idea if my theory has any merit, and I don't claim that it does. But it might explain a chamfer on a Studebaker-application distributor cam that is not on a Chevrolet unit. (In any case, the thing sounds normal to me and I wouldn't worry about it.) BP
    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

    Ayn Rand:
    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

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    • #3
      quote:Originally posted by BobPalma

      Here's some pure speculation, Glen; nothing more than a theory. I have no documentation that this might be true:

      Might the chamfer have been placed there as a pocket/reservoir for lubrication in the Studebaker application because Studebaker's distributor rotation is counter-clockwise, as opposed to clockwise for Chevrolets? If that was true, it would explain why your two Chevrolet distributors don't have the chamfer.

      During the era of point ignitions, manufacturers played with all sorts of ideas to provide rubbing-block lubrication and, thus, stabilize dwell over a longer period of time.

      As I said, I have no idea if my theory has any merit, and I don't claim that it does. But it might explain a chamfer on a Studebaker-application distributor cam that is not on a Chevrolet unit. (In any case, the thing sounds normal to me and I wouldn't worry about it.) BP
      Makes total sense as it's on the leading edge as the distributor turns counterclockwise. Might also be to reduce stress on the rubbing block since there would be a little more pressure on it in the CCW applications. Wonder if Pontiac did the same thing?

      Thanks BP.

      Analog man in a digital world.

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      • #4
        I am sure it is not a problem, I checked two of the Window Distributors and they both have the slightest different angle area AFTER the full open peak, the surface is, as you say NOT just where the rub block is, but full height of the cam, it is maybe 1/8" wide, it is hard for me to tell, it seems high to me, but just not the same angle as the rest of the flat area. It does not vary more than .0005 very slightly.
        Whatever it is for, they run fine. [^]


        StudeRich at Studebakers Northwest -Ferndale,WA
        StudeRich
        Second Generation Stude Driver,
        Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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        • #5
          quote:Originally posted by StudeRich

          I am sure it is not a problem, I checked two of the Window Distributors and they both have the slightest different angle area AFTER the full open peak, the surface is, as you say NOT just where the rub block is, but full height of the cam, it is maybe 1/8" wide, it is hard for me to tell, it seems high to me, but just not the same angle as the rest of the flat area. It does not vary more than .0005 very slightly.
          Whatever it is for, they run fine. [^]


          StudeRich at Studebakers Northwest -Ferndale,WA
          Yep you're right they are after the crown of the lobe I had it backerds. You described mine to a T so I guess I'll just get it cleaned up, intall the new parts and drop it in after I do the rear end swap.

          Thanks guys.

          Analog man in a digital world.

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