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Rear Axle Oil Seals -- '63 Avanti

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  • Rear Axle Oil Seals -- '63 Avanti

    One of the challenges of this restoration adventure is figuring out solutions to superficially simple but latently vexing problems. Although new to this club, what is readily apparent to me is the creativity of Studebaker people, a quality that this marque (as opposed to brand X cars) seems to develop out of necessity.

    So here's my current conundrum. I have the rear axle out of the car. Dana #44, 3:31 gears, twin traction box installed. The innards of the differential look good on inspection, properly oiled with all of their teeth. I want to replace the oil seals, paint it to look purty and reinstall it with my revamped rear suspension.

    Sounds straighforward, right? Hah. To do the rear pinion oil seal the shop manual tells me I need a "Universal Joint Flange Holding Tool J-6371" to remove the flange nut. There's a pretty picture of what looks like a spatula with a socket through the center. To install a new one the Manual says I need a "Pinion Shaft Oil Seal Replacer, J-2037." To remove the axle shaft oil seals the Manual calls for an "Axle Shaft Oil Seal Remover, J-943." To put it back on, I'm told I need "Axle Shaft Oil Seal Replacer, J-270-13."

    Are you kidding me?

    I have to believe that not everyone has a Studebaker service center in his neighborhood, that these extremely specialized tools are like hen's teeth and someone has devised ways to obviate the need for them.

    If I bang out the axles from opposite sides is there any reason I can't just pull the old seals off and tap the new ones on? That would solve the axle seal problem, but what about the rear pinion?

    Any thoughts you guys have would be greatly appreciated.

  • #2
    The J-tools listed are what Studebaker (and Kent-Moore tool) designed specifically for the job.
    There are many other ways to do it without these "special" tools. So you can be creative.
    The seals are straight-forward and fairly easy. Nothing special needed.
    I did MAKE my own R/A flange-holding fixture... which is really only needed on re-install. An Impact-Wrench will remove the nut (usually) without the fixture. But, you will need something to hold the flange when you torque the nut back down.




    Ray


    Specializing in Studebaker Restoration
    Ray

    www.raylinrestoration.com
    Specializing in Studebaker Restoration

    Comment


    • #3
      I didn't have any problem replacing the axle seals on my Avanti. TT 3:73. I didn't do the pinion seal as it wasn't leaking.

      When you take the axles out, you do have to ensure that the block doesn't fall out. If it does, you may need to make a tool to install it. I made one from a coat hanger and a piece of steel tubing.

      ========================
      63 Avanti R2, 4-Speed, 3.73 TT
      Martinez, CA

      Comment


      • #4
        quote:Originally posted by tluz

        If I bang out the axles from opposite sides is there any reason I can't just pull the old seals off and tap the new ones on? That would solve the axle seal problem, but what about the rear pinion?
        PLEASE! Do NOT "bang out the axles" on a Studebaker axle! You will damage the bearing, the backing plate holds them in, if you do it with the backing plate off, you will damage the tiny spacer blocks on the end of each axle on TT axles AND the bearing, AND they still won't come out! [:0]
        Just put the drum on backwards without the washer but with the nut, and slam them out individually or use a standard axle remover slide hammer.


        StudeRich at Studebakers Northwest -Ferndale,WA
        StudeRich
        Second Generation Stude Driver,
        Proud '54 Starliner Owner

        Comment


        • #5
          Hi, Rich,

          Point taken on the axles. I assume you disagree with Stan Gundry when he recommends in his book, "screw the axle nut onto the end of one of the shafts with the bottom side of the nut flush with the rear of the axle... Sharply hit the end of the shaft with a small sledghammer. The axle on the opposite side will shoot out."

          I did this unintentionally when I was removing the drums with the hub puller. Having removed one hub, I was working on the other and, upon delibering a hard shot to the puller, the opposite axle shot out about 6 feet. Remarkable. Anyway, I put the thing back in, because I wasn't at that point ready to do anything about the seals. Hope this didn't damage anything. For what it's worth, the axle slipped back in without trouble.

          If I use the hub-as-slide-hammer technique, do I pull the hub away from the housing to draw out the axle the hub is attached to or push against the taper toward the housing to pop out the opposite one?

          Tom

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          • #6
            I have a universal joint holding flange, it's called a 2 foot pipe wrench against the floor.

            Comment


            • #7
              quote:Originally posted by tluz

              Hi, Rich,/Cut/
              If I use the hub-as-slide-hammer technique, do I pull the hub away from the housing to draw out the axle the hub is attached to or push against the taper toward the housing to pop out the opposite one?Tom
              Just pull out on the hub and drum and bump the axle out, never drive in.
              StudeRich
              Second Generation Stude Driver,
              Proud '54 Starliner Owner

              Comment


              • #8
                Much obliged.

                Comment


                • #9
                  On this conversation, although my car is a 49 it fall into this same catagory.

                  Once you press the bearings onto the axle you have to "Seat" the axle and into the axle tube.
                  So do you basically tap with a rubber mallet to drive the axle gently into place until it seats? Then tap the Bearing Race into place around the brearing and into the tube? The repair manual is very vague, I mean this seems logical but man I just can't run down and get parts if it gets banged up.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Sorry to bore you guys with this topic but I am stymied by the pinion. Trying to replace the pinion bearing oil seaI. I have removed the nut using the pipe-wrench method suggested by leyrret, which worked like a charm after I loosened up the nut by putting 1 1/8" socket in a torque wrench and stomping on it. The satisfaction from that success was brief, however, because I have no idea how to pull out the pinion shaft and flange. The shop manual says I have to use "Universal Joint Flange Puller J-2576," which is obviously an imaginary item added to the manual by a sadistic South Bend engineer with time on his hands. I tried fabricating a puller by screwing the nut back on and inserting two pieces of 3/8" square rod under the nut and prying upwards with a bar. I succeeded in lifting the entire axle assembly off the ground but did not budge the pinion a millimeter. How is this done? Your thoughts are always appreciated.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The yoke is what you are trying to remove, its on a tapered shaft that
                      sticks out the front of the axle. The other end of this shaft has a
                      gear on it, and a crush seal. Be careful NOT to pry between the axle
                      housing and the yoke to get the yoke off. You should leave the nut on
                      the shaft, and use a puller that grabs over the yoke, or bolts to it.
                      The puller should have a threaded shaft that "pushes" against the end
                      of the shaft and "pulls" the yoke off. This is a different model Dana
                      but will give you the right idea :

                      http://www.madxj.com/MADXJ/technical...inionSeals.htm

                      Tom

                      '63 Avanti, zinc plated drilled & slotted 03 Mustang Cobra 13" front disc/98 GT rear brakes, 03 Cobra 17" wheels, GM alt, 97 Z28 leather seats, soon: TKO 5-spd, Ported heads w/SST full flow valves, 'R3' 276 cam, Edelbrock AFB Carb, GM HEI distributor, 8.8mm plug wires
                      '63 Avanti R1, '03 Mustang Cobra 13" front disc/98 GT rear brakes, 03 Cobra 17" wheels, GM alt, 97 Z28 leather seats, TKO 5-spd, Ported heads w/SST full flow valves.
                      Check out my disc brake adapters to install 1994-2004 Mustang disc brakes on your Studebaker!!
                      http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...bracket-update
                      I have also written many TECH how to articles, do a search for my Forum name to find them

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        "Universal Joint Flange" = yoke.

                        Tom
                        '63 Avanti R1, '03 Mustang Cobra 13" front disc/98 GT rear brakes, 03 Cobra 17" wheels, GM alt, 97 Z28 leather seats, TKO 5-spd, Ported heads w/SST full flow valves.
                        Check out my disc brake adapters to install 1994-2004 Mustang disc brakes on your Studebaker!!
                        http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...bracket-update
                        I have also written many TECH how to articles, do a search for my Forum name to find them

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          You will find these often slide off with your hands. I have never used a puller(if you have one use it) and I have done countless. Many require tapping or driving yoke off pinion. I usually use a brass drift or hammer so as to not beat up the yoke. If it's especially tight I have used a come -a-long attached to a piece of pipe or extension held by u-bolts to keep tension (Axle has to be secured) while driving on it to prevent battering bearings in races. Ones this tight are usually due to damaged splines and a rarity. If you don't have brass, block of wood and hammer may work if just tapping with regular hammer doesn't move it.
                          Incidentally these old Dana's don't use crush sleeves.
                          I wanted to add do not try to drive shaft inward. The yoke has to come outward off the shaft.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I have been dealing with GM's for to many years, yes thats right the
                            spacing and preload is based on shims, my bad. On the GM cars you
                            mark the nut, washer, shaft and yoke, and then R&R the yoke, then go
                            back to the original location and turn "a hair" that is usually safe
                            to not require messing with preload or ruining the crush sleeve.

                            Good to know there are shims, less chance of screwing anything up if
                            you need to use some extra "persuasion".

                            Tom
                            '63 Avanti R1, '03 Mustang Cobra 13" front disc/98 GT rear brakes, 03 Cobra 17" wheels, GM alt, 97 Z28 leather seats, TKO 5-spd, Ported heads w/SST full flow valves.
                            Check out my disc brake adapters to install 1994-2004 Mustang disc brakes on your Studebaker!!
                            http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...bracket-update
                            I have also written many TECH how to articles, do a search for my Forum name to find them

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              tluz,
                              sbca96 is correct if you are having a difficult time removing the flange. My 49 sat in a field for some time and I couldn't budge the darn thing. I simply used a harbor freigt puller in this kit http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=37824
                              Line up a diagnal from one hole to the other. Popped right off. Plus the kit is only $10.00 and I've used this thing so much it has paid for it self time and time again. Now if I'd stop losing the bolts to the thing I'd be set

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