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62 Daytona engine ID

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  • 62 Daytona engine ID

    According to previous info I received

  • #2
    Don't ask me what happened the topic jumped to posting before I even got started! Anyway, the only numbers on this V8 that I could find were not stamped, but cast into the top of the block on the passenger side front. Different from the new update techs page on v8
    ID, the 62 should begin with a V-534,901. Mine has a 1 above the number series -no V- and reads 535601 which probably means that it is the ID number and identifies it as a 259. Correct?

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    • #3
      The engine number for a 1962 V8 should be STAMPED on the top, left, front of the block. That is the driver's side (on a left hand drive car).
      Someone, maybe Matthew, has a good picture displaying the number and its location on a Studebaker V8.

      Gary L.
      Wappinger, NY

      SDC member since 1968
      Studebaker enthusiast much longer
      Gary L.
      Wappinger, NY

      SDC member since 1968
      Studebaker enthusiast much longer

      Comment


      • #4
        quote:Originally posted by bailsout

        Mine has a 1 above the number series -no V- and reads 535601 which probably means that it is the ID number and identifies it as a 259. Correct?
        No, the CASTING Number refers to the Block, not the finished Engine. The "1" is 1st. shift, that casting was used for every 224, 259 and 289 Engine built from 1955 to early 1962! [:0]

        The Engine number pad is not hard to find, being the absolute far left front corner on top of the block, you have to wipe it clean to read the stamping. If it has none, it is a factory replacement engine, you would have to look in a spark plug hole to determine 259/289.


        StudeRich at Studebakers Northwest -Ferndale,WA
        StudeRich
        Second Generation Stude Driver,
        Proud '54 Starliner Owner
        SDC Member Since 1967

        Comment


        • #5
          Can we be more specific about the front of the block? It may be a replacement motor and that's why I can't find it. I scraped away the crud below the head on the front of the block and see nothing. Where might it be in relation to the water pump housing arms that bolt to the block and head?

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          • #6
            Here's the pic of where to find the stamping:



            <h5>Mark
            '57 Transtar Deluxe
            Vancouver Island

            The NW Overdrive Tour in Parksville, BC
            May 23 & 24, 2009; check it out at -
            http://sdcvi.shawwebspace.ca/
            </h5>
            Mark Hayden
            '66 Commander
            Zone Coordinator
            Pacific Can-Am Zone

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            • #7
              Great pic! Unfortunately, I didn't find the foto until after I found the ID. After a lot of carb cleaner and pushing away a hard oilfilter line that perfectly drooped across the ID location I spotted the V and got the rest of the numbers to confirm its 259ness.
              Thanks all.

              Comment


              • #8
                StudeRich, that "1" above the casting number denotes which set of pattern equipment the mold was made from. The date the casting was made on appears in code on the rear of the block, to the right (even #cyls) of the block centerline. It faces upward between the bellhousing bolt bosses and the rear of the even cyl. bank.

                R2Andy
                R2Andrea

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                • #9
                  Andy; someone did mention those date codes on the back of the blocks and the decoding of the characters (maybe you), but I do not think we have the information posted on the main page or available to decode.

                  So I still recommend the more accurate Serial Number information of the completed Engine, to the block casting info because most people want to know the c.i.d. more than when it was cast.

                  You are right though, I am sure there were many patterns some even a bit different, I own, and have owned a few '58 to '60 blocks that the area between the lifter cover and the head do not have the 2 small reinforcement "humps" along the angled surface, but have horizontal GROOVES! Noticeably different, and the funny thing is, ALL of them always had rod bearings go bad, one '59 Lark engine did that 3 times even with different crankshafts before I junked it. So I have little faith in those blocks, my all original '58 President's original engine with 40,000 miles, lost one of it's rods also, and guess which block design it has!

                  Sorry I used the "shift code" info that apparently was hearsay info and not documented, but since they are usually 1 to 3 it made sense to me, and I don't think there are any known foundry workers left who know.
                  StudeRich
                  Second Generation Stude Driver,
                  Proud '54 Starliner Owner
                  SDC Member Since 1967

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    You're right Rich, the only correct to ID the engine as built is by the Stamped In number. It was merely my intention to clear up a misconception regarding the digit that appears (raised)above the casting number (also raised).

                    R2Andy
                    R2Andrea

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                    • #11
                      Actually, I figured it out by myself, although I got confirmation from the former Pattern Shop supervisor. As to cracking the casting code, my problem was determining which pair of numbers represented month and day. I'd not found any numbers higher than 12. Eventually someone else figured it out and it was posted in and old issue of the JTN.

                      R2Andy

                      Do you have a pic of that area on those blocks? I'm not quite sure where you're referring to.
                      R2Andrea

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                      • #12
                        Andy I can not get a pic right now of one of the rare Grooved blocks only used between 1958 and '60 or '61, because to get a good shot you need the heads off and one is not handy now, but it is easy to picture this whole area just below the head surface, smooth without the two "humps" but with at least 5 or 6 full length grooves front to back. This is pic is how 95% of the blocks look.
                        StudeRich
                        Second Generation Stude Driver,
                        Proud '54 Starliner Owner
                        SDC Member Since 1967

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Thanks for the pic. Rich. I'll have to look at some older blocks, mine are all full flow. Do you happen to know what pattern number those grooved blocks have? And casting date codes? It's not relevant to 99.999% of any body out there, just one of those little mysteries that I love to chase.

                          R2Andy
                          R2Andrea

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