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  • chassis rivets

    i want to pull the rear crossmember from a 1950 champion chassis and replace the bottom plate. where do i get the rivets to put it back on?
    I troll the parts suppliers but the chassis isnt represented in their catalogues

    cheers

  • #2
    Measure up the ones you take out and try here:
    http://www.bigflatsrivet.com/


    [img=left]http://www.studegarage.com/images/indy/gary_indycar25_vvsm.jpg[/img=left] Gary Ash
    Dartmouth, Mass.
    '32 Indy car replica (in progress)
    '48 M5
    '65 Wagonaire Commander
    '63 Wagonaire Standard
    web site at http://www.studegarage.com
    Gary Ash
    Dartmouth, Mass.

    '32 Indy car replica (in progress)
    ’41 Commander Land Cruiser
    '48 M5
    '65 Wagonaire Commander
    '63 Wagonaire Standard
    web site at http://www.studegarage.com

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    • #3
      Unless you're doing a full on restoration, some fine thread bolts of the same size should work. (Grade 5 or 8 only!)

      nate

      --
      55 Commander Starlight
      http://members.cox.net/njnagel
      --
      55 Commander Starlight
      http://members.cox.net/njnagel

      Comment


      • #4
        Not to be contrary but unless a nut/bolt fit the diameter VERY tightly...that is NOT the prefered way of doing it.

        Stick with the rivets or welding.
        When a rivet is hammered/squeezed...its center bulges out and tightly grabs a hold of both pieces of metal somewhat equally...with the same pressure.
        A nut/bolt will NOT do that.

        The pieces of frame-cross member joint should NOT move...in any driection. Otherwise, you end up with a very flexy frame...more than we already have..!

        Mike

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        • #5
          Sounds like it should be spot welded.

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          • #6
            I doubled my frame and bolted the bottom on with fine thread button head bolts with crimped style lock nuts, as well as the crossmembers(except the front one) If you make them a interference fit or if you get the hole proper size you can thread the bolt in and then nut it. Rivets are a pain.

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            • #7
              quote:Rivets are a pain.
              BUT....the..."proper"... way of doing it..!!

              Mike

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              • #8
                Weld 'em, rivet 'em, bolt 'em, do what you're good at! Then slather it up with a good coat of undercoating. One of my life's philosophies is "What ever works!" Remember, these cars were built to sell. They were very often built by the method that costs the least while meeting "Minimum" requirements using components supplied by the lowest bidder. Even the "Overbuilt" components were very likely supplied by the lowest bidder!
                When rebuilding and restoring my cars, I never hesitate to use extra material, or better built components. Especially in areas not seen without a lot of extra effort. At some of the non-Studebaker events, where half of the cars are Mustangs or '57 Chevy's they are examined top to bottom and up the tail pipe because they are so common. Our Studebakers are just unique enough that we are happy to see them show up with paint all over them, its running, and the owner is grinning!

                John Clary
                Greer, SC

                I have only two limitations ...BRAINS & ENERGY
                SDC member since 1975
                John Clary
                Greer, SC

                SDC member since 1975

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                • #9
                  I'm going to do something I've never done before on this Forum. I'm going to plug a book: http://www.amazon.com/Structures-Thi...8987545&sr=1-1

                  This is a book on structural engineering written for the lay person. You might expect it to be dull and dry. It's not; it's witty and informative. The author touches on things like bridges and locomotives, weapons, clothing, even the human body, and explains why they take the forms they do. The difference between riveted and welded joints is explained in there. Read that book and you will have a whole new appreciation of the structures we encounter in our everyday life.

                  I give it five stars out of five. Anybody who thinks of himself as a gearhead should have it on the bookshelf. It's not a chore to read at all, it's fun.

                  Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
                  Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I didn't take mine apart to replace the corroded metal. Cutting wheel to take it out and new metal welded in. But I thought the factory rivets and spot welds were a still little scary so we welded the frame member joints anywhere we could lay a good solid bead. I may lose points but I can ride out a bigger impact. Good Luck!
                    Dave Warren (Perry Mason by day, Perry Como by night)

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