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? about ignition coil resistance - 64 Daytona 259

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  • ? about ignition coil resistance - 64 Daytona 259

    Hi, I've been having cold running issues with my 64 Daytona 259 for a few years, I thought it was from not having a heat riser since it would stumble or die out when you'd try to accelerate unless it was already pretty warm ouside.

    Years ago I had put a mallory high energy coil on it that my Dad had purchased for his 69 Oldsmobile. My car then sat for over a decade until I got it running again a few years back.

    I just found out that this coil is a resistance coil, I measured the primary resistance and it was about 1.8 ohms.
    So I guess I'm my own worst enemy! [B)]

    I guess I'm not getting enough voltage to the coil. I really don't want to eliminate the pink resistor wire since it's in good shape.

    So basically I was wondering what a stock studebaker coil primary resistance is.

    I've seen some aftermarket high voltage coils that are 0.600 or 0.700 ohms. I don't know if they would work or if I should get a stock coil from one of the vendors.

    I'm running points with a delco window distributor.
    I'd appreciate any thoughts.
    Thanks!
    John

  • #2
    The simplest thing to do would be to get a stock replacement coil that didn't have an internal resistor. I think most of the performance coils have the resistor built in, so you'd have to bypass the pink wire to use that option.


    Tim K.
    '64 R2 GT Hawk
    Tim K.
    \'64 R2 GT Hawk

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    • #3
      Ok, thanks Tim!
      That's probably the best thing to do, I wish I had saved the old coil but was stuck in the bracket and I ruined taking it out.
      John

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      • #4
        The 40,000 Volt Pertronix Flame Thrower Coils I sell for Pertronix Ignition are 1.5 OHM, but for your stock setup using the resistance wire, I think your answer may be 0.0 Ohms.


        StudeRich at Studebakers Northwest -Ferndale,WA
        StudeRich
        Second Generation Stude Driver,
        Proud '54 Starliner Owner

        Comment


        • #5
          Most ignition coils meant for point type ignitions will have a resistance of 1.5 ohms and the ballast resistor will have a resistance of between 1 to 1.5 ohms. The lower resistance coils are to be used with electronic ignitions as the current draw is higher than the points can handle without burning the contacts in a short period of time. The electronic ignition systems use a transistor to trigger the coil. The transistor can handle a much larger current draw without failing. Bud

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          • #6
            quote:Originally posted by Bud

            Most ignition coils meant for point type ignitions will have a resistance of 1.5 ohms and the ballast resistor will have a resistance of between 1 to 1.5 ohms. The lower resistance coils are to be used with electronic ignitions as the current draw is higher than the points can handle without burning the contacts in a short period of time. The electronic ignition systems use a transistor to trigger the coil. The transistor can handle a much larger current draw without failing. Bud
            I think you called it Bud. thanks!
            I got a stock coil today and it reads about the same as the aftermarker coil. It's from Standard and it's marked on it "for use with external resistor".
            So, I think I'll have to look for a problem(s) somewhere else.
            I have to look at the distributor and double check the advance weights and vacuum advance, I think the weights where sticking before.
            I don't think I have the choke rich enough. It's a edelbrock 500 afb clone.
            Since the car sits alot and the fuel evaporates, by the time the car finally starts it takes almost a couple of minutes and by then the choke coil's been heating up. It's hooked up to the ignition switch. Maybe I'm better off hooking it up to the o.d. wire like a lot of people have done. I don't know if it has any power while your cranking.
            It usually dies out when you first start it, then you have to crank it and pump it again and then it gets off high idle too soon.
            Maybe I need the heat riser installed.
            Sometimes it cuts out pulling out of my yard and you have to quick start it up while cars are coming at you and that's dangerous.[:0] So I really need to fix this.
            thanks for the input guys!
            John

            Comment


            • #7
              I use the accessory connection on the ignition switch to feed the electric choke on the AFB's on my cars. On the Larks and Hawks, you can use the red overdrive feed wire for the choke, on the you will have to pull a wire through the firewall to connect to the ignition switch. Be sure that the resistor bypass in the starter solenoid is still working. I had one fail on my 62 Hawk a few years ago and that caused long cranking time as the ignition coil doesn't get enough voltage when the engine is cranking. Be sure that the choke is operating properly and that the fuel mixture isn't too lean as that will cause driveability problems when the engine is cold. Bud

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              • #8
                Sounds like you need to set the choke richer, John.

                Tim K.
                '64 R2 GT Hawk
                Tim K.
                \'64 R2 GT Hawk

                Comment


                • #9
                  quote:Originally posted by GTtim

                  Sounds like you need to set the choke richer, John.

                  Tim K.
                  '64 R2 GT Hawk
                  yep, you're right. I had rebuilt the stock 2bl stromberg years ago and had set the choke in the middle. It turned out the choke coil was wore out and was never fully opening and so it was running too rich and was fouling out the plugs. That took me a while to figure that one out. Since then I've been afraid to set it too rich but I think that will help since it's an almost new carb. Thanks!

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                  • #10
                    It a bit more trouble but an oil pressure switch works well for a choke. Alternator with stator terminal on it is another good spot.

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                    • #11
                      quote:Originally posted by leyrret

                      It a bit more trouble but an oil pressure switch works well for a choke. Alternator with stator terminal on it is another good spot.
                      good ideas, thanks!

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