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  • Chassis Rebuilding

    I have the Daytona just about to the point where I'm going to seperate the body from the frame. As I have a friend who will let me work at his body shop (and the hoist that goes with it), I want to minimize how long I tie up space. So with this in mind, I want to make a check list of what to have ready when I get my frame back from the powdercoaters.

    [u]REAR SUSPENSION</u>

    Leaf Springs
    Clean & Rebuild Rear Axle
    Rebuild rear brakes and lines
    Bushings and Shackles
    Rear Sway Bar & Bushings
    Shocks

    [u]Front Suspension</u>

    Sway Bar & Bushings
    Control Arms & Bushings
    Spindles and King Pins
    Center Pivot
    Bell Crank
    Reach Rod w/Power Steering
    Tie Rods, Ends and/or boots
    Front Brake Discs and backing plates
    Front Brakes Lines
    Shocks
    Fuel Lines

    [u]SPECIAL TOOLS</u>

    Shackle Tool
    Drum Puller
    "A" Spreader Tool

    What else do I need to consider? Ideally, I'd like to have new parts ready to go so that when I send the frame out, parts can start going on right away. This may mean finding other used parts, have them rebuild and save what's pulled off the Daytona for the Commander. I'm also sure I could have the front springs sent out with the frame and have them come back with the frame. Other than the control arms, what parts are reusable? The sway bars, bell crank and spindle I'm sure. Anything else?

    I'm not so worried about the calipers, fuel tank or things of that nature just yet. I just want to be able to roll the frame onto a trailer for the return trip.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Tom - Mulberry, FL

    1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2125.60)

    Tom - Bradenton, FL

    1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2514.10)
    1964 Studebaker Commander - 170 1V, 3-Speed w/OD

  • #2
    If you don't already have the make-it-yourself tool for installing & removing the shackle bushings (You got them out so I suppose you already have it!), get the plans from Chuck Collin's web site and have it ready. As you know (and for anyone else's projects) this will save you mucho time and scarred knuckles. Also, little stuff like lots of extra boots for tie rods, etc., I like to have an assortment of the pre-flared brake lines in various lengths, since I suck at double-flaring.
    Just my $0.02.

    Las Vegas, NV - Stop by, coffee's on!
    '51 Champion Business Coupe G899965 10G-Q4-1434

    Comment


    • #3
      I haven't started on this yet. I need to get the parts first. But I was just looking to make sure I order or buy everything I need before doing so. So I need a special tool for the shackles? Check.

      ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Tom - Mulberry, FL

      1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2125.60)

      Tom - Bradenton, FL

      1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2514.10)
      1964 Studebaker Commander - 170 1V, 3-Speed w/OD

      Comment


      • #4
        Contact Jim Lawrence for some new body mount pads

        Jim
        "We can't all be Heroes, Some us just need to stand on the curb and clap as they go by" Will Rogers

        We will provide the curb for you to stand on and clap!


        Indy Honor Flight www.IndyHonorFlight.org

        As of Veterans Day 2017, IHF has flown 2,450 WWII, Korean, and Vietnam Veterans to Washington DC at NO charge! to see
        their Memorials!

        Comment


        • #5
          Tape up the frame where the shackle bushings go-powder coating is thick & may prevent or at least make installing the new bushings difficult. Your powder coating company can help in that regard.

          60 Lark convertible
          61 Champ
          62 Daytona convertible
          63 G.T. R-2,4 speed
          63 Avanti (2)
          66 Daytona Sport Sedan
          59 Lark wagon, now V-8, H.D. auto!
          60 Lark convertible V-8 auto
          61 Champ 1/2 ton 4 speed
          62 Champ 3/4 ton 5 speed o/drive
          62 Champ 3/4 ton auto
          62 Daytona convertible V-8 4 speed & 62 Cruiser, auto.
          63 G.T. Hawk R-2,4 speed
          63 Avanti (2) R-1 auto
          64 Zip Van
          66 Daytona Sport Sedan(327)V-8 4 speed
          66 Cruiser V-8 auto

          Comment


          • #6
            Put new oil in that rear as soon as it's rebuilt! Too easy to forget if you wait![:0]

            Charles Eck
            Essex, MD

            '57 Commander 4 door sedan
            '66 Ford F-250
            '66 Ford F-100
            '53 John Deere 50
            '41 John Deere H All-Fuel
            '41 John Deere B All-Fuel

            Studebakers were made to drive! (Besides, they don't get lost as easy in the Wal-Mart parking lot!)

            Comment


            • #7
              Tom - sorry if I confused you, my fault. You can make the tool out of ordinary items, and it is almost critical to installing the shackle bushings. Otherwise you will drive yourself crazy or beat the thing to death getting them installed. Check this out:

              https://www.studebakerparts.com/stud.../shklbush.html


              Las Vegas, NV - Stop by, coffee's on!
              '51 Champion Business Coupe G899965 10G-Q4-1434

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanks Paul, but the link doesn't work. If this is something I can get from Chuck though (plans) that's fine. Thanks for the tip.

                ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                Tom - Mulberry, FL

                1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2125.60)

                Tom - Bradenton, FL

                1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2514.10)
                1964 Studebaker Commander - 170 1V, 3-Speed w/OD

                Comment


                • #9
                  Tom - Here's the verbage from the link that isn't working for you. there aren't any pictures on the link, but Chuck's explanation is pretty easy to understand (I even figured it out!) I used this technique on my 51 and I'm sure this was the first time since original assembly that these bushings had been replaced. I couldn't have done it without this advice. Here it is.


                  Replacing rear shackle bushings on your later model Studebaker is not a bad job if you make a tool to remove and install them. You will have to start by getting a piece of 7/16" USS.all-thread rod from a nut and bolt dealer. You will need at least grade five rod, not the kind they sell at hardware stores. The rod will come in three foot lengths and you should get at least eight nuts to fit, 11/16" wrench size. While you are there get a metal spacer that has a 7/16" center hole and a outside diameter of 7/8" or.875 and a thickness of about 3/8" .You will need a piece of pipe 3" long with a inside diameter of one inch and the outside diameter will be about 1 3/8" but the outside diameter is not critical.You will also need some large diameter, over 1 3/8", flat washers with a 7/16" hole. Get a few of these, six or so as you will bend a some. I find that cutting a piece of threaded rod about eight inches is a good size for most cars. If you are working on an Avanti you will need two different lenghts because of the small clearance from the spring to the body work. Jack up the car and put jack stands under the frame. Position your jack under the differential, and apply a little pressure (raise it 2-3"). You can then remove the through bolts at the spring and shackle. I start by replacing the bushing in the spring first as it it easier and you can get familiar with the procedure. In theory you put the threaded rod through the bushing. put the 7/8" steel spacer on and a nut. Then on the other side you slide the pipe spacer on and center it over the surround shoulder on the spring, put on a couple of large washers ( a little lube here will prevent galling) put on a nut and tighten to withdraw the bushing. In practice the bushing is worn and off center and it is impossible to center the 7/8" spacer. I just forget the spacer the first time and put a nut on it only. Then tighten the nut at the pipe spacer until you have withdrawn the entire rubber center from the bushing. You can repeat the procedure with the 7/8" spacer centered on the old bushing and withdraw it. This may require a couple of 11/16" box end wrenches about a foot long!! If you bend the threaded rod extracting the old bushings, it it time to cut a new piece and continue. To install the new bushing you can either cut a section about 3/8" from the old outer bushing case or counter drill the spacer so that when you use it to pull the new bushing into place you apply pressure only to the outside steel part of the bushing. You do not want to apply pressure to the center steel part of the new bushing. I use anti-seize on the outside of the bushing. I do not know if it makes them easier to pull in but it will help the next fellow in 2008. Once you have successfully installed one bushing in the spring you will have the experience to do the others and the ones in the frame as well. At this point raising or lowering the axle to align and replace the bolts in the shackle is a rather easy task. I re-check the torque on the bolts once the car is back on the ground at ride height.




                  Las Vegas, NV - Stop by, coffee's on!
                  '51 Champion Business Coupe G899965 10G-Q4-1434

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    if you are reusing your tie rod ends you will need some new boots for them as well

                    nate

                    --
                    55 Commander Starlight
                    http://members.cox.net/njnagel
                    --
                    55 Commander Starlight
                    http://members.cox.net/njnagel

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Spreading tool for the front A-arms.

                      thnx, jack vines

                      PackardV8
                      PackardV8

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                      • #12
                        Thanks guys!

                        ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                        Tom - Mulberry, FL

                        1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2125.60)

                        Tom - Bradenton, FL

                        1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2514.10)
                        1964 Studebaker Commander - 170 1V, 3-Speed w/OD

                        Comment

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