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02 Sensor?

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  • BobPalma
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by KGlowacky

    Not many cars turn my head anymore but that 58 conv. FI Desoto does. Is it yours or someone you know?? If it ever goes up for sale contact me I am interested. Thanks
    'Just noticed this thread. A thorough report and photos of that 1958 Adventurer convertible appeared in the June 2005 Cars & Parts magazine. It's a remarkable story of how the owner, an electrical enginner, found the car with the Bendix Electrojector still intact and made it work! [:0] BP.

    Leave a comment:


  • KGlowacky
    replied
    Not many cars turn my head anymore but that 58 conv. FI Desoto does. Is it yours or someone you know?? If it ever goes up for sale contact me I am interested. Thanks

    Leave a comment:


  • hank63
    replied
    Gary, in 1953 Armstrong Siddeley in UK fitted electric solenoids for gear shifting in their pre-selector gear box. Being a pre-selector box, it wouldn't shift by itself, it needed a foot on the "gear engagement pedal" after the pre-selection had been done.
    /H

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  • Swifster
    replied
    I've posted these pics before but they're still cool. This is the Bendix unit used by Chrysler. The car is a '58 DeSoto Adventurer and it was documented to have left the plant with this unit (and replaced shortly afterward with carbs [)])...













    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Tom - Lakeland, FL

    1964 Studebaker Daytona



    Michigan Speed - www.michiganspeed.com
    Club Hot Rod - www.clubhotrod.com
    LS1 Tech - www.ls1tech.com

    Leave a comment:


  • gordr
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by Mr.Biggs

    I honestly believe I could've gotten the concept of engine computers for vehicles if I'd been presented with such back in the 50s or 60s. What I would have had trouble believing is that you'd be able to hold said device in your hand![:0]

    Does anyone know about when Detroit started to think about electronic controls for engines and transmissions? I'm not talking about transistorized ignition or such - but true electronic control. And note that I said "think" - not "use".

    Miscreant adrift in
    the BerStuda Triangle


    1957 Transtar 1/2ton
    1960 Larkvertible V8
    1958 Provincial wagon
    1953 Commander coupe

    Biggs, I seem to remember an article in TW about the development of the Bendix fuel injection. Some Bendix engineers built an analog EFI system and put it on a '53 (?) Buick, in about 1955 or thereabouts. The system was all hollow state (vacuum tubes). Apparently they drove the car to Florida on the injection system.

    They couldn't interest any manufacturers in using it, and eventually the prototype went to Germany, and became the design inspiration for the Bosch D-jetronic. I think the D-jetronic hit the streets in 1967 in a VW type III.

    Some of the "facts" above may be wrong due to faulty memory on my part.

    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

    Leave a comment:


  • John Kirchhoff
    replied
    Prager, it's funny you should mention that, I've tossed around the idea of adapting a throttle body injection system to a Stude. But I guess that grandious idea needs to stay on the back shelf until I get more pressing matters finished. Like that 32" tv setting on the kitchen table with the innerds pulled out. However, that doesn't mean I won't wake up in the middle of the night thinking about map sensors, throttle position sensors or other such minutia. When I SHOULD be sleeping!

    Leave a comment:


  • prager
    replied
    Can I convert my Lark to use this??? Would I be the coolest or what??!!![8D]

    Still working to restore my 62 Lark in South Bend, Indiana

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  • Jeff_H
    replied
    Nate,

    Sometime recently I saw a article about that '57 ish Mopar effort. They had pix of a big finned Chysler with EFI on it. The controller for the EFI was analog and looked much like a early transistor radio in construction. Few tech details, but I think the "computer" only did the fuel injection.

    This page has a small blurb about it but no detail at all:

    http://cgcomm.daimlerchrysler.com/do...eet&docId=2210

    Wish I could recall what mag that was in, its not like I read a lot of them!

    Jeff in ND

    '53 Champion Hardtop

    Leave a comment:


  • dave smith
    replied
    chrysler had "electronic" fuel inj in 58

    Leave a comment:


  • N8N
    replied
    Not Detroit, but my '71 Porsche 914 has what I guess is probably one of the first true engine management "computers." It's an ANALOG computer. Anyone aware of a fully electronic FI earlier than the Bosch D-jet? Wikipedia says that Bendix was working on EFI as early as a planned 1957 intro, but the D-jet is the earliest one I'm aware of that actually made it to market. I think it was first used on some late 60's VWs.

    I'm not sure what the first EFI with feedback control was, but I'm sure someone will chime in.

    nate

    --
    55 Commander Starlight
    http://home.comcast.net/~njnagel

    Leave a comment:


  • studeclunker
    replied
    Detroit began to think about computers and onboard 'solid state electronice' in about '69. This was due in part to the environmental movement and the smog laws appearing in California. At first the Smog equipment was an aftermarket addition.

    The new federal laws required that these components be installed in the cars in the early '70s. So a lot of the nonsense that's on the cars now, was in the planning stages just after Studebaker Motors division died.

    It could very well be, that the new safety laws that were being discussed, and the fracas surrounding the Corvair, scared the upper management of the conglomerate that Studebaker now belonged to. They were just more data that convinced the management that the company simply wasn't a viable concern any more.

    I would love to see the minutes from those board meetings that were held from '62 to '64.


    Lotsa Larks!
    K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
    Ron Smith

    Leave a comment:


  • CHAMP
    replied
    I had a 86 Chevy Sprint that had electronic solinoids in the trans.for shifting. I also beleive Cadilac had a computeized fuel injection in 76?

    GARY H 2DR.SEDAN 48 STUDEBAKER CHAMPION NORTHEAST MD.

    Leave a comment:


  • John Kirchhoff
    replied
    I believe Chrysler was the first to use "fuzzy" logic technology on an automatic transmission in 1990. The way I understand it, fuzzy logic is when the onboard computer stores past instances of your driving habits (mph, rpm, throttle position, shift points) and then uses that information to determine when and how much oil pressure to apply to the clutches and so on during a shift. If you're grandma with a light throttle foot, the tranmission isn't going to exert more hydraulic pressure than is needed to save wear and tear on seals and such. If you're lead footed, it's going to know to apply more pressure which will reduce the chance of clutch slippage and the resulting overheated oil, hot and worn clutch plates. It was supposedly the first transmission (maybe mass produced) that used electric soleniods instead of hydraulic pressure to operate valves in the tranny.

    You have to realize that in the 50's an onboard computer would have been house sized like old grandaddy Sperry Univac (nothing like a Bendix Hydrovac!) and you would have needed a locomotive to tote it around. Something like that would have been a real pain to parallel park!

    Leave a comment:


  • Mike Van Veghten
    replied
    My Conestoga's gonna have two......if I ever get the d*mn 299 finished and installed! One in each exhaust pipe.

    No better way to run a oxygen meter.

    Mike

    Leave a comment:


  • Roscomacaw
    replied
    I honestly believe I could've gotten the concept of engine computers for vehicles if I'd been presented with such back in the 50s or 60s. What I would have had trouble believing is that you'd be able to hold said device in your hand![:0]

    Does anyone know about when Detroit started to think about electronic controls for engines and transmissions? I'm not talking about transistorized ignition or such - but true electronic control. And note that I said "think" - not "use".

    Miscreant adrift in
    the BerStuda Triangle


    1957 Transtar 1/2ton
    1960 Larkvertible V8
    1958 Provincial wagon
    1953 Commander coupe

    Leave a comment:

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