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Parting Out - How To

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  • Parting Out - How To

    I have a number of "beyond restoration" cars that I am thinking of parting out this summer. Most have serious rust issues, some vandalized broken glass, some dents, but are otherwise complete cars. Most are low milage, good interiors, parked many years ago, stored under cover. I don't want to toss anything that would be of value to a restorer, but I would like fair value for stuff. Quite frankly, I find the task to be a little daunting, given the number of cars.

    I am mechanically minded, having restored a few cars almost from the ground up. I have all the tools necessary to take off carbs, generators, alternators, starters, taillights, trim, window cranks and mechanisms, trunk hinges, brake drums, TT rear ends, unbent bumpers, hubcaps and radiators. This still leaves me with some heavy, bulky stuff such as motors, transmissions, glass, frames, & interiors. (like 2 nice white 66 Daytona bucket seat interiors). I do have a tractor with a front end loader and bucket).

    How does one go about doing this task quickly? How long should it take per car? What tools are best? Should I rent a scrap metal bin? Should I call in some heavy equipment? (Magnet crane) What happens if SDC friends hurt themselves when taking apart a car? Is it somehow my liability? What is necessary to take off? (e.g. gas tank, tires, serial numbers?) Should I wait until I have more time to take my time. Should I wait until the economy improves a bit? Should I start by selling off some best cars first, then move to the worst cars in case unforeseen parts are needed? (I have sorted them into three groups - Good or good restorable, possible to restore, and parts only.) EBay, Craigslist or drag to swap meets?

    All comments and suggestions are welcome.

    Paul

  • #2
    Paul

    If it were me, and I wish it was, with the number of parts/cars you have.

    I'd first of all put together a photobucket file on each vehicle and offer parts or cars for sale on the forum. I'd personally pull the parts unless you know the buyer, just to be safe.

    After a period of time or at the same time, I'd put each car on Craigs list and offer cars or parts.

    Pricing-I'll let the more knowledgeable members take up that challenge.

    Generally, no matter how bad the car, the roofs, hoods and trunks are salvagable.

    Good Luck

    Bob

    Comment


    • #3
      quote:Originally posted by sweetolbob



      Generally, no matter how bad the car, the roofs, hoods and trunks are salvagable.


      The "problem" with sheet metal is that the market is generally quite local. Seems few are willing to pay to ship sheet metal and/or come and get it. Some have had luck bringing sheet metal to one of the bigger Stude swap meets, however, but it's a crap shoot even then.

      Same with big hunks like engines, transmissions, rear ends, even brake drums.

      The parts that end up being the most valuable and saleable are trim parts...stainless, gauges, switches, window cranks, etc...stuff that isn't being repoped and that can easily be shipped.



      Dick Steinkamp
      Bellingham, WA

      Dick Steinkamp
      Bellingham, WA

      Comment


      • #4
        Are you coming to South Bend? I could sure use those bucket seats.


        7G-Q1 49 2R12 10G-F5 56B-D4 56B-F2
        Middle Tennessee 37th Annual Car Show April 4 2009

        Comment


        • #5
          I would post pics first, to see if anybody wanted so many parts off one car that they would be willing to come and get it. That would save you the trouble of taking them off. Also, the interest generated will help you determine what to keep and what to pitch. Who wants to waste time taking off parts and storing them when nobody's going to want them? I've saved parts for people so that they could come and pick them up for free, but finally had to junk them. Hopefully, a few guys will get together on a lot of parts to be shipped to one area.

          Comment


          • #6
            If you are looking at the same efficency that a salvage yard has, it's not going to happen. Most yards can strip 2 or 3 cars down a day with a good, experienced crew.

            Take your time. It may take a week per car depending on the rust. One hint on sheetmetal. A good panel needs to be cut oversized from the original seems so that a body man can trim it as necessary.

            Shipping is an issue of supply and demand. If you have good fenders for a '59/'60 Lark, some one will probably pay for shipping. A piece of trim or other small parts, who knows? Know what parts are available new and price accordingly (roughly 50%). I need some sheetmetal for the Commander that will need to be cut from a donor. Would I buy from you? If I don't think I can find it closer, absolutely.

            Engines and transmissions may be a little more difficult. But good 289's, 4-speed transmissions and overdrive transmissions may sell well if priced right. The same is true with rear axle assemblies. You probably won't get much of a market for Dana 27's, but Dana 44 will probably move.

            As for pricing, if you are looking for every last penny, I think you'll have slow sales. Fair or a little light on the heavy parts will allow things to move. Keep in mind that the quality of the part is important too. It's not enough that you may have something, but try to make sure that it's at least driver quality unless the buyer states they'll accept less.

            Good luck!

            ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
            Tom - Mulberry, FL

            1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2125.60)

            Tom - Bradenton, FL

            1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2514.10)
            1964 Studebaker Commander - 170 1V, 3-Speed w/OD

            Comment


            • #7
              IMHO, by far the easiest would be to sell entire cars. A complete parts car will sell for less than the sum of its parts, perhaps a LOT less, but it should sell for more than the value of its most valuable part(s).

              For example, if you had a rusty, crusty '53 coupe, with no decent body panels, but it did have a primo set of grille shells, I'd say a fair asking price for the entire car would be a bit more than the shells alone would fetch. Part that car out, and the only sure-fire sale will be the grille shells. Some of the other parts, if usable, may sell, but you will be left with 95% of the car's bulk to scrap. And, you have to expend the labor to part the car out, find space and time to store and catalog the parts, and expend time and effort to advertise, package, and ship the parts you do sell. I am doing this in a small way, and it's very time-consuming. I happen to enjoy it, and I'm using some of the parts myself. If I were to sit down and do the sums, I'm sure I'm earning a few cents per hour doing it.

              Disassembled cars eat up a HUGE amount of storage space. And nice seats and interiors have to be stored indoors. That's a consideration, for sure.

              What part of Canada are you in, Paul?

              Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
              Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

              Comment


              • #8
                I would not mind the other bucket seat interior if you were coming to South Bend.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I suggest that you put each vehicle on eBay. This will save you a lot of time and effort. It will also establish a current fair market value. If you want some price protection, put a reasonable reserve on each vehicle. You probably will not get what the individual parts may bring, but you may never sell the bulk of the individual parts.

                  Gary L.
                  Wappinger, NY

                  SDC member since 1968
                  Studebaker enthusiast much longer
                  Gary L.
                  Wappinger, NY

                  SDC member since 1968
                  Studebaker enthusiast much longer

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Hey Paul,
                    If you 'invite' the right people there won't be any liability.
                    I'd say a generator a plasma cutter a few sawzalls, a couple of people with parts books to list removed parts, a camera to document condition and you could go through car by car in no time.
                    You have a backhoe to lift the heavy stuff, so after removing the driveline just pile the scrap metal in a pile and call in a crusher at a later date.
                    You will need to clean out one building to store all the saved items.
                    Then I would set up a web site where people could search by part number with photo for price and condition, I suggest this because you have alot of stuff and you won't have time to answer all the phone calls, or are you retiring? You can set the site up prior to teardown so you only have to plug in the numbers.

                    Let me know when you plan to do this, maybe a trial run weekend this summer would be in order I'll bring the OFF.

                    Bill



                    Bill Foy
                    Kingston, Ontario
                    1964 Wagonaire Slider
                    Bill Foy
                    1000 Islands, Ontario
                    1953 Starlight Coupe

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I'm ready for parts and I'm close to you, Paul. Give me directions and I'll bring you a two / four for your time That's how you part out a car.
                      Dave Warren (Perry Mason by day, Perry Como by night)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thank you for your guidance and replies.

                        I'm still working - thank goodness - so I don't really have the time to part out big time now. I plan to use most of my spare Studebaker time to play and drive some of my cars. I have six running here at the house, and I'd like to get my mom's Speedster going. (#2 of the 14 show cars). A bunch more at the barns.

                        Carting interiors to SB is a little far, and they are really bulky and I have limited vacation. However, they are less bulky than a whole car. I'm about 3 hours from Niagara Falls or about 4 from Detroit. I do have a car trailer and a dolly, but the smaller van I am currently driving will not pull the trailer.

                        I did advertise in both the Ontario and Hamilton Chapter newsletters for months. I only got one call from someone looking for NOS green seatbelts.

                        I also really appreciate all of the work vendors do for our club. I've bought lots of stuff from them, even though I could probably find some of the parts on a car I have. Its a lot of work for them dismantling, dragging stuff around and shipping. I'm not sure if I'm up to the task given the potential payback - estimated earlier to be a few cents per hour. I'd rather tinker and drive.

                        As of Saturday, I still have 5-7 feet of snow in front of the barn doors and could not open them.

                        I may be open to showing interested people with spending money to buy some whole cars or parts cars around by appointment only. I am considering the parts warehouse idea. Who knows? That's why I asked the questions.

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