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  • Spring Oil Change

    For many years I have changed engine oil in my Studes bothin the spring and the fall(and when summer mileage indicated a change was necessary). I live in Southern Ontario and Studebakers are not winter driven here anymore - it is a death sentence for them because of the extensive use of road salt.

    The price of gas has dropped the last few months, but oil is still high - especially 15W-40 CI which I am still finding up here. The last case I bought (earlier this month) was REAL close to $5.00 CDN per U.S. quart!!

    The apparent reason for recommended spring oil change was to purge the sump of condensation accummulated over the winter while in storage.

    Question: In just 6 or 7 months of storage in an unheat modern suburban garage, does condensation accummulate to a large extent? (I don't see any on the dipstick). Could the water not just be "distilled" out by going on a real good warm-up run (of say, WELL over half an hour? Or ?). That would save on the environment AND the not inconsequential expense of a change of oil that is already clear and very clean ( yes, a fall oil change is a MUST). Would this practise be acceptable, or is it a too dangerous pay-me-now-or-pay-me-later senario?

















    Roger "153624" Hill

    55 Champion
    47 M-5
    Izzer Buggy
    Junior Wagon
    Roger Hill


    60 Lark Vlll, hardtop, black/red, Power Kit, 3 spd. - "Juliette"
    61 Champ Deluxe, 6, black/red, o/d, long box. - "Jeri"
    Junior Wagon - "Junior"

    "In the end, dear undertaker,
    Ride me in a Studebaker"

  • #2
    From the last oil change I id, I have had about 1-1/2 qts of spent oil sitting within a glass, sealed container inside of my garage. It has sat there all winter and I haven't seen any water accumulation detectable by visual inspection. SO, IMO, I would not expect any adverse effect.

    There is always some water within oil, and it encapsulates. What you could do, although a little costly (not so much for one-time insurance though, is to send a sample to blackstone labs to see if there is enough water content to be concerned about.

    ========================
    63 Avanti R2, 4-Speed, 3.73 TT
    Martinez, CA

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    • #3
      this may or may not appeal or apply to you, but ... I start my Stude at least every 2 weeks during the winter and get it good & hot and rev it up quite a bit. I move it around the driveway to move the brakes and such and believe this is enough....????

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      • #4
        I think that as long as the oil gets to operating temperature, you are ok. The problems I have seen are the engines that are started for only a few minutes and not given enough time to remove the moisture form the crankcase.

        Jamie McLeod
        Hope Mills, NC
        Jamie McLeod
        Hope Mills, NC

        1963 Lark "Ugly Betty"
        1958 Commander "Christine"
        1964 Wagonaire "Louise"
        1955 Commander Sedan
        1964 Champ
        1960 Lark

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        • #5
          Again, Roger, I'll report experience with three collector cars I have now owned over 30 years: 1964 Daytona hardtop (32 years), 1973 Mustang convertible, and 1971 Barracuda convertible (33 years each). The other four collector cars in the stash I've owned anywhere from 1.5 years (Leonard Shepherd's former 1964 Daytona convertible) to 15 years (1956 Packard Clipper Super hardtop).

          On all cars, I've never changed the oil when they are taken out of storage. I change about every other year before they go back in storage, assuming annual mileage of maybe 500 miles max on the most-used.

          Now the critical thing is this: Never, I repeat, never do I start and run one of the cars without letting it run at least one full hour. This is important to burn off contaminants, and I feel a major reason why my unofficial schedule has [apparently] enjoyed long-term success.

          When you pose a question like this, you'll get many opinions. I'm not saying mine's worth more than anyone else's, but it is based on long-term ownership using a specific regimen that has proven successful, for what that is worth. BP
          We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

          Ayn Rand:
          "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

          G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

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          • #6
            The general recommendation is to run the vehicle at highway speeds for 25 to 30 miles, to fully dry out engine and exhaust system prior to shutdown for winter storage, then don't touch it 'till spring. Periodic operation of the engine during storage creates a "wet" engine, as does not following the above recommendation before storage. It is unlikely that a 4 to 6 month storage of a wet engine will cause problems such as stuck valves or pistons. The problem arises when our best laid plans get interupted by lifes curves and the engine is not started for a year or more. Then you have a stuck or seized engine. I agree with Bob that an oil change every other year is OK if the mileage on the oil is 1000 or less, but always store a car "highway hot". We all know that a rebuilt engine that has just assembly lube and has never been started, will sit for years without seizing up. It is no fun driving out seized pistons from a poorly stored engine.

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            • #7
              Thanks everyone.

              I thought that I was being a bit of an "old woman" (there's another old expression, probably not politically correct - but who cares except old women) for changing the oil in the spring! AND I will pay close attention to running time, especially before storage.

              Now my stash of CI 15W-40 will last TWICE as long!! Thanks, Bob!

              Roger "153624" Hill

              55 Champion
              47 M-5
              Izzer Buggy
              Junior Wagon
              Roger Hill


              60 Lark Vlll, hardtop, black/red, Power Kit, 3 spd. - "Juliette"
              61 Champ Deluxe, 6, black/red, o/d, long box. - "Jeri"
              Junior Wagon - "Junior"

              "In the end, dear undertaker,
              Ride me in a Studebaker"

              Comment

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