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  • Rear Springs

    Does anyone have a picture or advice on rear springs, preferably HD ones #1560439 used on a 64 wagon. The ones on my car have been modified by adding 2 extra leafs, I would like to remove at least one to soften the ride a little.





    There are two leafs that are square cut, one is the second down from the top and extends from bushing to bushing, sorry no picture. The second one is five down from the top as seen in the pictures. Then there is a short one that is at the bottom.

    I believe there is only suppose to be 5 leafs even for an HD application, any ideas.



    Bill Foy
    Kingston, Ontario
    1964 Wagonaire Slider
    Bill Foy
    1000 Islands, Ontario
    1953 Starlight Coupe

  • #2
    quote:Originally posted by Captain Billy

    Does anyone have a picture or advice on rear springs, preferably HD ones #1560439 used on a 64 wagon. The ones on my car have been modified by adding 2 extra leafs, I would like to remove at least one to soften the ride a little.
    There are two leafs that are square cut, one is the second down from the top and extends from bushing to bushing, sorry no picture. The second one is five down from the top as seen in the pictures. Then there is a short one that is at the bottom.
    I believe there is only suppose to be 5 leafs even for an HD application, any ideas.
    Station wagon HD rear springs were six-leaf (AKA cop car springs). This is a picture of an original station wagon six-leaf off my '64 Daytona Wagonaire compared to an original four-leaf off my '64 Daytona convertible. I put NOS six-leaf springs on my Wagonaire and used the old ones on my convertible. To me the six-leaf has good ride quality and certainly improved the height and handling on my convertible. I also have a comparison picture with both springs side by side in full length which I could send if you want.


    Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia
    Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
    '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

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    • #3
      Thanks Paul,

      Now, which leaf to remove, on your HD spring is there a square cut leaf, if so where is it in the stack?

      I'm not sure if it can be seen in the pic but there are 7 springs.

      My ride height is good, if not too good, 12" to the rocker panel ahead of the rear tires. I loaded about 250 lbs in the back to measure drive angles, the height remained the same.....stiff

      Bill



      Bill Foy
      Kingston, Ontario
      1964 Wagonaire Slider
      Bill Foy
      1000 Islands, Ontario
      1953 Starlight Coupe

      Comment


      • #4
        That squared off leaf is a over load leaf off a pickup. Someone has added that leaf. I have 2 just like it in the barn and that's what they came off of.


        7G-Q1 49 2R12 10G-F5 56B-D4 56B-F2
        Middle Tennessee 37th Annual Car Show April 4 2009

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        • #5
          You could soften the ride by greasing between the leaves, or just spraying some WD40 between them with it jacked up might help. Rusty leaves absorb shock.

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          • #6
            Those cut off leaves might have been added to counter a rear sag problem. Your cut off section appears much thicker than a piece of regular spring.
            On both my Avanti and 55 Pres, I inserted a 40" section of standard spring, to raise the rear due to spring sag. Both cars came up 1.5" and still ride fine..


            Bob Johnstone
            www.studebaker-info.org

            64 GT Hawk
            55 President State Sedan
            70 Avanti (R3)
            64 GT Hawk (K7)
            1970 Avanti (R3)

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            • #7
              quote:Originally posted by Captain Billy

              Thanks Paul,
              Now, which leaf to remove, on your HD spring is there a square cut leaf, if so where is it in the stack? ...
              Unfortunately I don't seem to have a good picture of the lower side of a spring. If you capture this one and blow it up some I think you can see the next to smallest leaf which is cut square as compared to the others. However, unlike yours, all the leaves are the same thickness.


              Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia
              Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
              '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

              Comment


              • #8
                Well, I guess I'll have to add leaf removal to the list of things to do, If that softens it too much then perhaps new springs are in order.

                I think I'll start with the full length leaf, second fron the top.







                Bill Foy
                Kingston, Ontario
                1964 Wagonaire Slider
                Bill Foy
                1000 Islands, Ontario
                1953 Starlight Coupe

                Comment


                • #9
                  Don't take the #2 spring out unless you are going to replace it. That supports the ends. I would take the squared off one out.


                  7G-Q1 49 2R12 10G-F5 56B-D4 56B-F2
                  Middle Tennessee 37th Annual Car Show April 4 2009

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    God only knows what a little oil might do....That square cut spring has no plastic insert like the rounded ones do, causing more resistance to bounce, Check the rounded ones to make sure that the inserts are even still in there.

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                    • #11
                      Your original springs were weak, and a PO decided to have extra leafs added. This is a common fix... and I do it all the time with used Studebaker springs as replacements. I do agree that they should have put the plastic insulators between the leaves- but I've seen many springs without them.

                      Take a 4 1/2" grinder with a thin cut-off wheel on it, and remove the ends of the squared pieces (about 1" at a time). It doesn't take much trimming to change the spring-rate. You only need to go 7/8th the way through- then a screwdriver will snap the piece off. Go for a short drive between carvings... This will "set" the springs so you can judge ride-height.

                      This "might" lower and soften the ride enough for you to be happy. It won't take much time or cost much... so it's worth a try.

                      Ray


                      Specializing in Studebaker Restoration
                      Ray

                      www.raylinrestoration.com
                      Specializing in Studebaker Restoration

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