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  • Gas tank holes

    I have a tank witha few 1/4" holes on top. What kind of patch should be used to repair it.

  • #2
    quote:Originally posted by emc53

    I have a tank witha few 1/4" holes on top. What kind of patch should be used to repair it.
    Either get a better tank or have a fabrication shop using yours as a pattern make up a new one.

    Your tank sounds too far gone to salvage.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Borrowed Bams50's sigline here:

    "Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"
    --------------------------------------

    Sold my 1962; Studeless at the moment

    Borrowed Bams50's sigline here:

    "Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"

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    • #3
      Too far gone? I would think that someone could weld it up for ya, if you don't have the ability to do so. It's just metal.

      Matthew Burnette
      Hazlehurst, GA

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      • #4
        This the only tank I could find. I was planning on sealing the inside.

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        • #5
          I have an old soldering iron, the kind you have to heat with a torch, that I use for soldered repairs to gas tanks so no flame is needed. Radiator shop taught me this.

          [img][img]
          Dwain G.
          AL SORAN RACING

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          • #6
            Hook up the exhaust pipe from a newer car to your gas tank so that it's filled with oxygen free air. Then just mig weld it up with patches as you would a floor panel.

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            • #7
              They make a compound for this that dealerships use is called metal patching compound is comes in a grey stick and one on its main uses is filling gas tank holes. you cut a piece off work it for a few minutes and put int over the holes and it get as hard as metal and its fully sandable.

              Ryan

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              • #8
                As Dwain indicated, soldering is a good bet. If you have the tank cooked there would be no fumes left and it could be welded or brazed.
                A friend of mine had a tank from a '37 CE that was missing most of its top half. He cut a piece of sheetmetal and basically replaced the whole top half. No one will ever see it and it works fine.

                Whatever repair you do, it's a good idea to have the inside sealed.

                Thirty years ago we could chuck a tank that had a pin hole. Today they are too scarce to not be frugal.

                Brad Johnson
                Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                '33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight
                "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

                Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
                Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                '33 Rockne 10,
                '51 Commander Starlight,
                '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée",
                '56 Sky Hawk

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                • #9
                  I had a 1971 MGB with the same problem back in 1989. I sanded the top down to bare metal then laid fiberglass on top. When that was dry I used some of Bill Hirsch's fuel tank sealer. To this day it still holds!! Try using fiberglass and the tank sealer.



                  Laisez le bon temps roulez avec un Studebaker
                  Laisez le bon temps roulez avec un Studebaker

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                  • #10
                    I know a guy who fixed a tank once, using POR-15 and fiberglass cloth. He told me that POR-15 is impervious to gasoline once it hardens. While he had the tank out, he sanded the whole thing down to bare metal, and then covered the whole thing with the fiberglass cloth and POR-15. He said that it would prevent any future leaks as well. He then painted the whole thing. Looked really nice. I know he drove the car for several years until he sold it, and he never had a problem with it.

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                    • #11
                      Hey guys, do your research!!
                      Check out www.gastankRENU.com they are professional tank restorers and can fix almost anything that may be wrong with a tank. They are worldwide with 50 plus agencies doing tanks, with over a million done in the past 23 years!!
                      Regards

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                      • #12
                        I just had my 57 GH tank done by Moyers Gas Tank Renu in Greensburg, PA, and they did one fantastic job. My tank was covered in grime, and the inside had gas tar, about an inch thick, coating the bottom. They cleaned it inside and out, sealed the inside, and repainted the whole exterior in some type of thick black coating. It looked like a brand new tank. One heck of a job for $250. Really nice people too. I would recommend them to anyone.

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                        • #13
                          Thanks Guys
                          I just bought a good tank today

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                          • #14
                            Here's a brief from the central Indiana Gas Tank Renu franchise holder, Max Merritt:

                            http://www.maxmerrittauto.com/showpa...howitworks.htm

                            Max's Gas Tank Renu did the tank for my 1956 Packard Clipper several years ago. Nice work. Interesting to go to their shop, too, and see all the odd-ball tanks they have sitting around awaiting repair. They had a late-1950s Ford station wagon tank with a really weird shape. BP
                            We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                            Ayn Rand:
                            "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                            G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

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