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Piston rings and refreshing an engine.

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  • #16
    I see a disaster coming on. In short, take you motor to a reputable machine shop and have them do the job. You are changing parts, wanting to reuse piston rings, not going to hone the cylinders, rod bolts, balancing, etc. It's a major hassle to have to remove and rebuild it again, and very embarrassing, simply because you are cutting corners. Yeah, I might sound harsh, but all this runaround is getting old. The job would be done by now, rather than all this back and forth. I ALWAYS have the engine assembly balanced. I ALWAYS use NEW piston rings. I ALWAYS hone the cylinders, at the least. I ALWAYS properly mic the cylinders and pistons to make sure they are in spec. I ALWAYS check the ring lands if I am reusing the pistons. I ALWAYS have the rods checked and resized if they need it. Rod bolts are cheap. Then there's the heads; ALL the parts need to be properly inspected and replaced where needed: Valves, valve guides, springs, seats, which should have hardened ones installed on the exhaust at the least. And hen there's the cam/lifters/bearings, if the block needs any work, have new cam bearings installed. Hot tanking (rarely done these days) ruins bearings. If the cam/lifters are reused, be absolutely exact as to which goes where, same lifter on the same lobe. Just one mixed up will kill the cam real fast. And the crank: I ALWAYS mic it myself, or have it checked, and if it's good, have it polished and rechecked. If you get to the point of installing the pistons/rods, plastic gauge every rod and main. These are ALL things that need to be done for a good job, and end up with a good running motor that will last. I have been doing motors for well over 50 years, for customers and myself, with great results. I retired 10 years ago and still get calls because people can't find someone to do the job right, not cut corners, or have returns to fix what were scrimped on. Do it once, do it right, and enjoy it. Can't afford all that? Can you afford to do it yet again, costing even more money? Start saving your money to afford the job, or, do it right and do it ONCE. Or, I direct you to the first sentence I wrote.

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    • #17
      I know on the champion six the oil hole on the rod is drilled offset and the piston is mounted on the rod a certain way and you cannot mix odd numbered rods with even numbered rods. Is that the same case on the V8 motor or did Studebaker get away from that concept. I made that mistake on a six years ago messing with a Stude motor and not having the manual... had a busted rod and a broken camshaft as a result. It may not apply here...... but definitely a manual is a must. Or take real good pictures and make notes of how it came apart to get it back together the same way.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by yeroldad View Post
        I see a disaster coming on. In short, take you motor to a reputable machine shop and have them do the job. You are changing parts, wanting to reuse piston rings, not going to hone the cylinders, rod bolts, balancing, etc. It's a major hassle to have to remove and rebuild it again, and very embarrassing, simply because you are cutting corners. Yeah, I might sound harsh, but all this runaround is getting old. The job would be done by now, rather than all this back and forth. I ALWAYS have the engine assembly balanced. I ALWAYS use NEW piston rings. I ALWAYS hone the cylinders, at the least. I ALWAYS properly mic the cylinders and pistons to make sure they are in spec. I ALWAYS check the ring lands if I am reusing the pistons. I ALWAYS have the rods checked and resized if they need it. Rod bolts are cheap. Then there's the heads; ALL the parts need to be properly inspected and replaced where needed: Valves, valve guides, springs, seats, which should have hardened ones installed on the exhaust at the least. And hen there's the cam/lifters/bearings, if the block needs any work, have new cam bearings installed. Hot tanking (rarely done these days) ruins bearings. If the cam/lifters are reused, be absolutely exact as to which goes where, same lifter on the same lobe. Just one mixed up will kill the cam real fast. And the crank: I ALWAYS mic it myself, or have it checked, and if it's good, have it polished and rechecked. If you get to the point of installing the pistons/rods, plastic gauge every rod and main. These are ALL things that need to be done for a good job, and end up with a good running motor that will last. I have been doing motors for well over 50 years, for customers and myself, with great results. I retired 10 years ago and still get calls because people can't find someone to do the job right, not cut corners, or have returns to fix what were scrimped on. Do it once, do it right, and enjoy it. Can't afford all that? Can you afford to do it yet again, costing even more money? Start saving your money to afford the job, or, do it right and do it ONCE. Or, I direct you to the first sentence I wrote.
        Yes, I agree and we don't do patch jobs either.

        However, in defense of the OP, he had the motor rebuilt some years back and it only ran 200 miles. At present, he is only thinking of swapping in reconned rods with ARP bolts. I don't see problems or shortcuts he'll regret.

        jack vines
        PackardV8

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        • #19
          They cannot wear as there is no movement between the bolt and the bolt hole. Any play could allow movement, which, I am sure you will agree, would not be a good thing. To paraphrase P T Barnum ' You will never get very far by overestimating the intelligence of the average grease-monkey.' I can easily see some doofus with a drill or rat tail file making it easier to install those bolts!!

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