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Stude Avanti rear wheel cylinders

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  • Brakes: Stude Avanti rear wheel cylinders

    I recently purchased two new rear wheel cylinders for my Avanti. Would it be a waste of money to take these new units and send them out to be sleeved in brass or SS?

  • #2
    Yes.............

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    • #3
      Explain why?

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      • #4
        Yes. They should be protected from corrosion by bleeding out the old fluid periodically. A typical recommendation on this forum is every three years.
        --Dwight

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        • #5
          OMG!......Dwight i am so so overdue!............15 years ago I put in a two chamber master and have not bled out the lines since!........although I do replace the DOT3 in the two chambers! This is all leading to the fact that in the spring I will have to pull the drums and check not only the lining but the cylinders!......why??????? well I have no leaks, but recently when I put the car in reverse the rear brakes lock up!!......this is a major PITA!........I have to rock the car in first then reverse (4-speed). This seems to be an intermittent PITA, so as I just said this spring the car gets on the lift and the inspection begins. I may just put on new shoes even if the old are still good...........the last time shoes were fit has to be 45 years ago. So many fellows have weighed in with theories as to why the brakes are locking up in reverse, that I will just have to take a look as I said in the spring, or sooner if the car can not be put into reverse and move!

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          • #6
            AFAIK, rear cylinders are available. Why sleeve?
            78 Avanti RQB 2792
            64 Avanti R1 R5408
            63 Avanti R1 R4551
            63 Avanti R1 R2281
            62 GT Hawk V15949
            56 GH 6032504
            56 GH 6032588
            55 Speedster 7160047
            55 Speedster 7165279

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            • #7
              Originally posted by 64studeavanti View Post
              AFAIK, rear cylinders are available. Why sleeve?
              Well you are correct, and LOL should out live me!

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Hawklover View Post
                I recently purchased two new rear wheel cylinders for my Avanti. Would it be a waste of money to take these new units and send them out to be sleeved in brass or SS?
                I'm not quite sure I understand; bear with me---
                I've been working on cars for a looong time. All kinds of cars; all kinds of work. Doing brake jobs.
                After a very scary drive home with no (leaking) brakes, after doing the brakes on my '53 Commander (≈ 1958) and NOT honing the cylinders, I bought a cylinder hone and enough stones to last forever (still got everything), and made certain that honing the cylinders was a religious part of the brake job.
                Here's the point and question:
                I stopped with the very time-consuming honing operation years ago after reading that with the increases in materials technology, honing the cylinders was no longer needed as long as one made reasonably certain that the cylinders were not disturbed when replacing the brake shoes.
                Haven't had a problem in more than twenty, thirty years of doing brake jobs this way.

                Two questions:

                1) Am I "dancing with the devil"? Have I just been extremely lucky all these years, and "...my number just hasn't come up yet"?

                2) Would not the brand-new Avanti brake cylinders and associated synthetic "rubber" pistons (which do NOT degrade like the old real-rubber-stuff used to) be made from the same materials as that made for my 2000 Dodge Caravan (which is getting ready to get its second--or third (I've forgotten)--"no-cylinder-honing" brake job)?
                And if all these points are really the case, do you need to be concerned about having your brand-new cylinders re-sleeved?

                Please understand that I am asking all this from the position of wanting you to make me smarter (I know; I know--I give you all the really hard jobs), and most definitely not from an argumentative standpoint.

                Many thanks for bearing with me.
                ------------------------------------------------------------

                "Those whom the gods hate, they keep alive".---old, OLD ancient Greek saying.

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                • #9
                  A new wheel cylinder is $20. Spending a couple hundred $ (or more) to protect $40 worth of parts - that won't corrode to the point of needing replacement for decades- seems unwise. And the there is a sleeve that car potentially slip and create a lot of trouble. KISS. Avoid things that can go wrong especially these days when workmanship is nearly extinct.

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                  • #10
                    I thought that I would extend the useful life of the cylinders. And btw, the 2 cylinders were $90.00 each, not $20.00:-)

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Hawklover View Post
                      I thought that I would extend the useful life of the cylinders. And btw, the 2 cylinders were $90.00 each, not $20.00:-)
                      Now, by saying that you thought you'd "extend the useful life", you've really piqued my curiosity.
                      Is there something about those wheel cylinders which makes them more prone to wear than the brake cylinders made for other cars? Is the iron composition different? Are they made from some other alloy? What...?

                      I've lost track of all the brake jobs I've done, going back 30 years or more (when I stopped "messing with" the brake cylinders), but I can attest to this latest set of facts simply because they're the most recent---

                      The 2000 Caravan rear drums I'm getting ready to work on is the second Caravan I've had, and done brake jobs on, with over 200K miles on the odometer (the other is a 1992). The cylinders on both have never been touched when doing a brake job; and have never given any indication of needing to be touched (remember: I'm very careful in making certain the pistons don't move when I replace the brake shoes. There's even a special tool made for keeping the pistons compressed and immovable when working on the brakes).

                      With all due respect, might you be anticipating a problem which really doesn't, or shouldn't, exist?

                      [I'll be the first to emphasize that what works for me may not work for you; and that what works best for you is to keep doing things the way you've always done them...]

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                      • #12
                        Actually I have to laugh, the ones on the car now do not leak, but because the brakes are locking up intermittently when put into reverse more often than not, come spring I will have to pull the drums to check the lining and yes just go ahead and put the new units in. If not for the locking up issue, I would never have given a second thought to replacing the units. I do have a new set of lining in the box, riveted ones!.....99% of lining for Avantis is bonded AFAICR.

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                        • #13
                          I would like to inject a cautionary note in here. Ten years ago I bought a '64 Hawk from a retired mechanic, and drove it home, across the mountain. When I pulled the drums to check the brakes there were two leaking cylinders and one stuck cylinder. Yet, the brakes worked and stopped the car seemingly as they should. So, don't waste your time worrying about leaking or stuck cylinders; You will be just fine!

                          Just kidding. Even though the linings and drums looked like nearly new the car was dangerous. Don't neglect the brakes and don't forget to flush the fluid.
                          --Dwight

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                          • #14
                            Thanks Dwight I will!

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                            • #15
                              Last ones I bought were $20 .Pays to shop around. (Looked up price at time I posted above comment.) Spending too much and then spending more to protect overspending is ??? (Dear Overseers: I'm commenting on faulty logic. I've wasted $ by trying to scrimp and I've been scalped, too. I really, really don't want to insult anyone!!!) Yeah , it is so weird that the slightest maladjustment can give you fits, but a seized wheel cylinder can go unnoticed, especially on the rear.

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