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What size clutch for a 1962 GT Hawk 289 three speed on the column ?

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  • Clutch / Torque Converter: What size clutch for a 1962 GT Hawk 289 three speed on the column ?

    My brothers 62 GT Hawk needs a clutch but Stude International says we have to take it out to see what size it is. Do we have a choice of sizes? Or will a 10 1/2 fit anyways? What is the best size? I have never installed a clutch before. We are not racers so the car will be driven normally. Any suggestions?
    Hope everyone is well and thanks again----Dan

  • #2
    As long as you use the SAME size both the Pressure Plate and the Clutch Disc. you will be OK with the correct 10 1/2 Inch size for a 289, the 259 gets a 10 inch or 10 1/4".
    All V8's use a 1 1/8" Spline Disc. with Diameter to match the Pressure Plate.

    The big variable in Clutches from different suppliers, is the strength and Number of the Pressure Plate Springs.
    A Standard 289 gets 9 Springs and a H.D. or Avanti gets 12, but the Color of each indicates the tension to get the desired Total result.

    It is always advisable to remove the Flywheel and have it Machined, also replace the Throughout Bearing.
    You do NOT want to take it all apart again for many Years and Miles, so do it right the first time.

    Have the Release Shaft & Lever Assy. INSIDE the Clutch Housing checked for cracked or loose Levers and have them Welded, they are only Broached together at the Factory.
    Last edited by StudeRich; 11-06-2022, 11:56 PM.
    StudeRich
    Second Generation Stude Driver,
    Proud '54 Starliner Owner
    SDC Member Since 1967

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    • #3
      I'd go with the 10.5", no matter what is in it now. Whatever you do, do NOT install a heavy duty pressure plate. It will increase pedal pressure to point of ridiculousness. There is no need for a HD clutch in 99 percent of Stude V8s out there. Also, a HD pressure plate will overly stress the linkage, and the weakest component is the coupling which has two pins which hold it in place. They tend to crack at the thinnest point, and you will gradually, but quickly lose clutch travel till you cannot shift into gear. If you choose HD, be sure to carry a couple of those connectors in the glove compartment, and a piece of cardboard to slither up under the car.

      As mentioned, if replacing the disc, it's best to also replace pressure plate and have the flywheel ground at same time. If only replacing the disc, you run a chance of slippage, at least the first few thousand miles, till the new disc liner scrubs in to the uneven surfaces on the PP and flywheel. If lucky enough to have a clutch specialty shop nearby, buy from them, and they will also grind the flywheel. They can also adjust the pressure plate to spec, by adding or removing the springs. Look the specs up in the Shop Manual, or Stude Rich can probably tell you, off the top of his head.

      Also, if in doubt, replace the throw out bearing while the car's is apart. Agree with tack welding the t/o bearing fingers on the cross shaft, inside the bell housing.

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      • #4
        Thank you Joe and StudeRich ! I learned a lot from this post. We were planning on replacing the throw out bearing and pressure plate but thanks for the advice on the flywheel and tack welding the bearing fingers. I did not know that was a weekness of the system. Also, my brother fell off a truck and broke his left leg really badly (this is his car) so he does not want to push any harder than necessary to operate the clutch. A heavy duty clutch is not wise for him and he is easy on clutches any way. Thanks for the advice---Dan

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        • #5
          My old shop here always advises taking as little or no material off a flywheel or brake drums. Only if it needs it. How many times can you turn down a flywheel before you run into clutch problems ?? Again, if you're lucky enough to have an old school clutch shop (luckily I do) they will advise according to your parts and driving needs.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by jackb View Post
            My old shop here always advises taking as little or no material off a flywheel or brake drums. Only if it needs it. How many times can you turn down a flywheel before you run into clutch problems ?? Again, if you're lucky enough to have an old school clutch shop (luckily I do) they will advise according to your parts and driving needs.
            Can't remember the last used Studebaker flywheel we saw which did not need a skim cut to clean up. Unless severely scored, very little depth of material is removed. I wouldn't replace a clutch and pressure plate without turning the flywheel.

            jack vines
            PackardV8

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            • #7
              And how much would be too much to take off a flywheel? .015? .030? .062? Not all at once, of course, but at what point is too much? JT

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              • StudeRich
                StudeRich commented
                Editing a comment
                The LEAST possible for level.
                Although I am sure they are thick enough that you COULD take a lot more, but the Factory Balance will be off more.

            • #8
              All the above. Plus, I welded the inner release arms to the shaft. Then the outside arms to shafts (outer clutch linkage) came loose - Ended up welding all arms to their shafts - No more problems.
              paultk

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              • #9
                Just for historical reference. From a 1983 RayLoc catalog: CA1614, 10-1/8” Diameter, 1545 lbs.

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