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1952 170 cu in down draft fumes

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  • Engine: 1952 170 cu in down draft fumes

    Just got my truck roadworthy. Getting fumes from tube. Is there a way to address this? Any way to make it better

  • #2
    The Most common cause is Piston Rings bi-passing exhaust and some compression past worn, stuck or Carbon'ed up Rings.
    Wet (with Oil) and Dry Compression Tests are in order to test for Bad Valves or Rings.

    Are the breathers and filter in the Oil Fill Cap able to breathe in fresh Air?
    StudeRich
    Second Generation Stude Driver,
    Proud '54 Starliner Owner
    SDC Member Since 1967

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    • #3
      If it's the tube I'm thinking of it should have a "filter" plug of cloth like gauze in it. It's the crankcase breather - so I'm told. Since I can't have the boat (that my engine is in) bilge filling up with crankcase gases, it was suggested I convert that tube into a PCV system involving drawing vacuum off the manifold, venting the filler tube and running that line up to the air cleaner. When I got my motor running (after about 25 years) it smoked too, but the more I run it the less it smokes/vents.

      You can probably find that discussion by searching "PCV installation," or one of the guys who's done it will come on and re-explain!

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      • #4
        Newly awakened sleepers will often belch and fart for a time before settling into routine. That is also true for cars. Give it a hundred miles or so and see if things settle down. If not, it is almost certainly time for rings at the very least and possibly more. Truck engines were worked HARD.

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        • #5
          Like Ross said, give it some Rislone and run it; It will probably improve. Oil control was never that great on these motors so don't over react! I have an older (68 yrs!) tractor that runs just great, but when you put 3 16's behind it you will see some blow-by. I would not even consider trying to overhaul it.

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          • #6
            As Richard says above make sure the breather cap is clean and not contaminated with oil. Try a quick experiment and remove the oil filler cap while it is running and see if the fumes are reduced. Although the draught tube is designed to create a slight vacuum in the crankcase you could install an extension on the pipe to allow the crankcase fumes to exhaust a little farther back. Also, what was done in the early days you could re direct the crankcase vapors into the air cleaner. This was done by many to remove any evidence of a smoking engine for selling purposes. It did contaminate the air filter system and therefore required additional maintenance, but it removed the smoke. The ultimate fix is a reconditioned engine.
            I have designed a fan air assist system to remove unwanted crankcase vapors and it creates some additional velocity to move the vapors out.

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            • #7
              I agree with all said above.
              Expanding on what SR’s suggestion in post #2, there are 2 crankcase “tubes”; one up top for adding oil, & a road draft tube pointed down on the right side of the engine. Both have filters; one up top inside the filler cap & one inside the road draft tube. and held in place by a cotter pin running thru both sides of the tube.
              Clean the filler cap by sloshing in solvent & blow or air dry. On the road draft remove the cotter and the wad of mesh, & check for a mud dauber nest or similar obstruction. Then replace that mesh with a similar-sized piece cut from a metal (brass?) pot scrubber.
              You might also remove the 2 tappet covers to verify that each still has its internal, sheet metal, baffle in place.
              Then put some miles on & see if the fumes abate.

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              • #8
                A big thank you for info. It has been asleep for at least 7 years. A little prep and fired up first time. I have changed all fluids, front to back. Refreshed brakes. Cleaned up oil bath breather, new oil filter driving it short runs daily. Tires are shot. It hold 40psi oil pressure, not smoking that you can visibly see, but man it stinks. Seems to getting better or maybe I am getting use to it. I am so glad to have it. The last time i drove a c-cab was in 1978

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                • Big Dan
                  Big Dan commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Only 7 years? That's a "nap!" Mine sat in the Arizona Desert for 25, and that was after all the cars were donated to the yard. No telling how long it sat at the previous owner's house DOA. After a good cleaning and new head gasket, it fired right up! I was very impressed with that little Champion!

              • #9
                What about the Gas? Is there still a large percent of stale Gas in it?

                Also, incorrect Ignition timing will also cause a stink.
                StudeRich
                Second Generation Stude Driver,
                Proud '54 Starliner Owner
                SDC Member Since 1967

                Comment


                • #10
                  Mine had that "old oil burning/junk yard" smell to it the first 2 or 3 hours I ran it after (at least) 25 years. And I don't have an exhaust system on it yet, so just from the exhaust manifold. And you could see the old oil and dirt smoking off it.

                  Old oil changes and hardens after time and will smell bad when it "burns." So, all the old oil smoke deposits in the exhaust manifold and exhaust system will probably have to be "burned out" and it will stop with a few hours on the engine.

                  As long as it doesn't smell like "Old Spice" no one will probably notice. New cars have a certain smell, and so do "OLD" cars!
                  Last edited by Big Dan; 11-08-2022, 08:31 AM.

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