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Newport Engineering's NE3940SP wiper motor conversion

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  • Body / Glass: Newport Engineering's NE3940SP wiper motor conversion

    A technical inquiry:

    Has anyone used Newport Engineering's 12V conversion wiper motors on a '39 Studebaker?

    I have a '39 Studebaker Coupe Express that has been converted to 12V, and I believe the car (truck) originally came with a vacuum wiper motor. The Coupe Express was, of course, based on a '38 Studebaker Commander sedan, I believe, which I makes me think it had a vacuum wiper motor as standard equipment. There is, however, an electric motor shown in the parts catalogs for the '39. Was this used ONLY on Presidents?

    I ask this silly question, as their NE3940SP will fit only a '39-40 Studebaker that originally had a vacuum wiper motor and NOT an electric wiper motor.

    If anyone has run into this before, I'd appreciate hearing from you.

    Denny Foust
    studeguy54@gmail.com
    Last edited by studeguy54; 11-14-2022, 11:23 AM.

  • #2
    If there is an Electric Wiper Motor shown in a STUDEBAKER Parts Catalog, then looking at it's Model Code on the part number listing line with the '39 Year Model, will tell you what you need to know, Commander, President etc.
    StudeRich
    Second Generation Stude Driver,
    Proud '54 Starliner Owner
    SDC Member Since 1967

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    • #3
      I have never used one on a 39 Stude, but I have used their kits on several 41 to 46 Chevys, 41 to 48 Fords, 48 to 54 GM AD trucks and several others. All of them fit perfectly the first time with no modification.

      The difference between the electric motor Stude and the vacuum motor Stude is the bracket welded into the cowl. The original vacuum wiper motor bracket is used to install the new electric motor. Most cars from the late 30s to the early 50s used a Trico vacuum wiper motor, or another brand that fit the same bracket. The Newport kit consists of a motor with a bracket that will fit the original vacuum motor bracket. Then instructions and hardware on how to hook the original arms and transmissions to the new motor.

      If your original transmissions and linkage are not in useable shape, you may be able to rebuild them using the moving parts from another make or model of car.

      There is generally not enough room to install the new electric switch where the original switch was mounted, but you can usually create a drive for a remote switch that will come out in the same hole. If you need an idea how to do it I can post some pictures.

      If you plan on driving it much, they sell an optional switch that will give you a delay wiper function. The switch is available on Amazon at a better price, it's actually a truck switch used on several makes.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by enjenjo View Post
        There is generally not enough room to install the new electric switch where the original switch was mounted, but you can usually create a drive for a remote switch that will come out in the same hole. If you need an idea how to do it I can post some pictures.

        If you plan on driving it much, they sell an optional switch that will give you a delay wiper function. The switch is available on Amazon at a better price, it's actually a truck switch used on several makes.
        I'm not sure about fitment of the particular unit made for Studebakers, but I have a couple comments about the Newport System in General. I installed it in my 1951 Ford F1 Truck. It's a good system once you work out a few of it's "pissy" items.

        First is grounding. I found out the hard way that this unit is VERY PARTICULAR about grounding and simply bolting it in will not be sufficient. I ended up finding out (after putting it in and pulling it out about 4 times) that you will have to run a 14ga GROUND wire bolted to the wiper motor (not just the mounting frame) to a good solid grounding point - I have a "ground bus" in my truck directly wired to the negative battery post that I use for that type of thing.

        Second, the delay wiper switch also works VERY WELL. But it is a monster size wise. In its stock position, mine mounts up on the top of the dash close aboard the windshield and it was a bear to move the dash wires from the light switch around to create enough room to fit. Luckily my wiring was new and I wasn't dealing with "crispy, well done" wires. It also has to be VERY WELL GOUNDED.

        Lastly, I found the pins on the actuator arms were slightly smaller (and loose) than the holes in the wiper pivot arms. You may need to put a bushing in there if you want to get your full wiper swing and don't want them to "tick" when using the wipers.
        Last edited by Big Dan; 11-04-2022, 09:02 AM.

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        • #5
          Thank you, everybody, for your comments. When your car (truck) has a lot of fabrications in it, comments like this are helpful!

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