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POR-15 floorboards

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  • Donald Erickson
    replied
    POR-15 PORPATCH works great for small pin holes and building up thin spots!

    Donald Erickson
    Bemidji, MN
    1953 Champion (project)
    1956 Commander (driver)http://i85.photobucket.com/albums/k7...tudes_0015.jpg

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  • Donald Erickson
    replied
    I also used POR-15 when I did the floor of my '53 Studebaker back last July. I used the metal prep and cleaner from por-15 on the new steel and the rusted areas I took a steel brush on my angel grinder and removed a good amount of rust before cleaning it and POR-15 coating it. It still looks as good as the day I brushed it on! When I positioned my front seat with the rails and brackets I slid the hole set up over the 3-day old POR-15 and not one scratch was made. This stuff is TUFF! I was sold on RustOleum products before this, but went to POR-15 after testing RustOleum on my rusted '51 GMC truck frame and found that I needed something better then RustOleum. I will use RustOleum spray cans on small rust-free parts, but nothing else.

    Donald Erickson
    Bemidji, MN
    1953 Champion (project)
    1956 Commander (driver)http://i85.photobucket.com/albums/k7...tudes_0015.jpg

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  • chocolate turkey
    replied
    As far back as 1975, I used a rust paint, RustOleum, or equivelent, then, when dry, used a good roofing tar that set up but never hardened over it. I filled the seams of my fenders (1964 Commander) and any other place that moisture could penetrate and then painted over it again as a finish in whatever color was appropriate.
    The car lasted 225,000 miles, 25 yrs. without a problem in the treated areas.

    Brian K. Curtis

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  • Harv
    replied
    Now for my few cents. POR-15 is good stuff. Used it back in '94 on the frame-on resto of my '50 Champ Starlight Coupe. Coated (brush) the entire frame, top/bottoms of welded in new flooring & trunk, back side of all fenders, entire underhood area and backs of bumpers. You MUST wear protection and have NO EXPOSED skin as it won't come off except with time. I use a face shield & Nitrile Gloves (very cheap to buy at Harbour Freight!) to prevent brush splash from ruining by pail skin. I always have some on hand for touch-ups. The small can 6-pack is very handy, not cost wise, but overall a good thing to buy. [8D]

    StudeBakerHarv

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  • 63larkcustom
    replied
    Thanks Don! Saved a potential heartbreak..

    Bob Sporner
    Palm Springs, California

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  • Original50
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by 63larkcustom

    HI Guys, The floor looks exactly as it did in the photos.. no flaking, peeling, etc. Just follow the directions and you will be pleased. I will be painting over mine.. but thats a ways off yet.

    Bob Sporner
    Palm Springs, California
    Bob, you will need to use the POR15 Tie Coat Primer if you plan to paint over the cured POR15 paints with Acrylic paints. Since the POR15 has NO pores, other paints will not stick to it after it sets up. You could have painted over top of it it it had not set up (paint it while it is still sticky). My referencees comes from a POR15 distributor who live 1 mile from me, Gary Chrisman at 336-449-5407 or 336-449-6108

    Don Dodson

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  • 63larkcustom
    replied
    HI Guys, The floor looks exactly as it did in the photos.. no flaking, peeling, etc. Just follow the directions and you will be pleased. I will be painting over mine.. but thats a ways off yet.

    Bob Sporner
    Palm Springs, California

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  • bradnree
    replied
    I use Rustoleum...........Brad

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  • Randy_G
    replied
    I thought I would update this post and ask a couple of questions? Its been a almost a onth since you applied the POr-15 on your floorboards how do they look now and can you paint over them afterwards or would you want to? I know parts of the floors in the Lark are grass colored until its parked over dirt then they are dirt colored so I will be in the market for this product.

    Randy_G
    www.AutomotiveHistoryOnline.com

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  • ralt12
    replied
    POR-15, for us, has proven to be an extremely tough surface coating. It took a lot of time and effort, and you really do need to take precautions not to get the stuff on you--it takes a long time to get it off bare skin.

    The trunk area in silver:
    http://nelson-motorsports.com/109-0935_IMG.JPG

    The rear fender area in battleship grey:
    http://nelson-motorsports.com/109-0934_IMG.JPG

    '53 Commander

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  • 63larkcustom
    replied
    I'm very pleased with it. the floor seems a bit stiffer than it was before if thats possible (perhaps a bit of wishful thinking) but all in all i think it was a good fix.

    Bob Sporner
    Palm Springs, California

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  • studeclunker
    replied
    Looks great Bob! Keep us posted. I for one am very interested. My wagons have some rust in the front, no holes, just lots of surface rust. Looks like a good way to prevent it from getting any worse.


    Lotsa Larks!
    K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
    Ron Smith

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  • 63larkcustom
    replied
    The POR-15 seems to be holding up well.. no flakes, etc yet. I think its gonna stick.

    Bob Sporner
    Palm Springs, California

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  • bams50
    replied
    ...and if you want the reiforcement factor of fiberglass but don't like the long strands, there's Duraglas; uses chopped instead of shredded fiberglass.

    I have used tons of both in my day and personally prefer Duraglas; just looks neater...

    It should be noted that neither of the above are a high-quality repair; they can be used for bridging small holes, but do not treat or stop rust long-term. I've seen it used for filling body holes- mixing it, spreading it about 2" thick on magazine paper, then slapping it over a pre-prepped rust hole (ground clean and trimmed of rust)... when it starts to set up, the paper can be peeled off; then ground to contour and finished with bondo. Looks great for a month or 2, then starts lifting and bubbling [xx(]

    If you want to use either, they do work pretty well; just consider them a temporary patch.

    Spelling note: I'm never quite sure if it's spelled, "fiberglas" or "fiberglass"... seen it both ways...[^]

    Robert K. Andrews Owner- IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
    Parish, central NY 13131
    http://www.cardomain.com/ride/2358680/1

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  • JDP
    replied
    The fiberglass putty stuff is called Tiger Hair;


    http://www.rcustomcar.com/Tiger-Hair...on-P758C0.aspx


    JDP
    Arnold Md.
    Studebaker On The Net
    http://stude.com
    My Ebay Items
    http://www.stude.com/EBAY/

    64 GT hawk
    63 R2 4 speed GT Hawk (Black)
    63 R2 4 speed GT Hawk (Black) #2
    63 Avanti R1
    63 Daytona convert
    63 Lark 2 door
    62 Lark 2 door
    60 Hawk
    59 3E truck
    52 Starlight
    52 Starliner
    51 Commander

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