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When did Studebaker QUIT using tapered rear axles?

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  • Rear Axle: When did Studebaker QUIT using tapered rear axles?

    The title says--or asks--it all...mostly.

    But it occurred to me that this question can be asked at least one other way, and might influence my choice of vehicle, based on the nightmarish experience I had with a '53 Commander when attempting to do a simple (!) brake job on the rear brakes (nightmarish, as in 'ruined axle' when I finally got one of the drums off):

    IF Studebaker stopped using tapered rear axles on some models, can someone provide a list of the models on which it was easier to service the brakes, than on my '53?

    Many thanks.



  • #2
    Short answer about the servicing the brakes - most V8 models got better brakes in 1954 and up.

    Short answer about the tapered axles - hardly any of them and at the very end of production.

    jack vines
    PackardV8

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by PackardV8 View Post
      Short answer about the servicing the brakes - most V8 models got better brakes in 1954 and up.

      Short answer about the tapered axles - hardly any of them and at the very end of production.

      jack vines
      You'll have to pardon me; I'm having one of my increasingly frequent bouts of 'brain fade'.

      I understand the statement about "...better brakes...", having been the proud owner owner of a '53. Nothing had braking the equal of my '53. But that doesn't address the issue of servicing the brakes on later models.

      I don't understand the "...hardly any of them and at the very end of production", either.
      Does this imply that I would have as hard a time doing a brake job on a '63 Avanti as on my '53 Commander?

      Please help. Many thanks.

      Comment


      • #4
        Maybe. Depends on how stuck the rear hubs are. With the proper tools and technique tapered axles and hubs will yield easily 99% of the time . Fairborn Studebaker sells
        flanged axles for those who would rather avoid the drama, and they are superior to the original axles.

        JT

        Comment


        • #5
          Not to hijack this thread.............but concerning the rear axles, why in the world would Studebaker use a rear end that required the rear axles be removed to pack the rear bearings? Most cars just relie on the hypoid oil to treat the bearings.

          Comment


          • #6
            To answer the Post # 1 question, it was the Middle of 1965 that the Dana 27 and the Dana 44 both "Open" and Limited Slip, were changed to Flanged Axles on all Sixes and Eights; for "194", and "283" Engines; and in '66 to also include for the new "230" c.i.d. I6 Engine.

            And the other question: YES on STUDEBAKER Avantis, unless it is one of 9 Avantis with an R3 Engine!
            ________________________________________________________________________________ ______________

            Originally posted by Hawklover View Post
            Not to hijack this thread.............but concerning the rear axles, why in the world would Studebaker use a rear end that required the rear axles be removed to pack the rear bearings? Most cars just rely on the hypoid oil to treat the bearings.
            This is Way OFF Topic, but I'll Bite. I am sure there will be several "Guesses" on this one!

            My Number ONE reason: Dana Spicer was a VERY Long Time Supplier of critical Parts for Studebaker Corp.
            As such, Studebaker used a Dana Axles as always, WHY Change?

            They certainly did NOT want a Mickey Mouse GM Axle with Funky "C" Clips to remove the Axles requiring opening the Diff.

            And everyone knows Grease is FAR superior to Oil to lube a Bearing.
            Last edited by StudeRich; 09-03-2022, 08:17 PM.
            StudeRich
            Second Generation Stude Driver,
            Proud '54 Starliner Owner
            SDC Member Since 1967

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by StudeRich View Post
              To answer the Post # 1 question, it was the Middle of 1965 that the Dana 27 and the Dana 44 both "Open" and Limited Slip, were changed to Flanged Axles on all Sixes and Eights; for "194", and "283" Engines; and in '66 to also include for the new "230" c.i.d. I6 Engine.

              And the other question: YES on STUDEBAKER Avantis, unless it is one of 9 Avantis with an R3 Engine!
              ________________________________________________________________________________ ______________



              This is Way OFF Topic, but I'll Bite. I am sure there will be several "Guesses" on this one!

              My Number ONE reason: Dana Spicer was a VERY Long Time Supplier of critical Parts for Studebaker Corp.
              As such, Studebaker used a Dana Axles as always, WHY Change?

              They certainly did NOT want a Mickey Mouse GM Axle with Funky "C" Clips to remove the Axles requiring opening the Diff.

              And everyone knows Grease is FAR superior to Oil to lube a Bearing.
              LOL Rich I have over 150K miles on my 1980 Mercury Grand Marquis.................never ever had a problem with the rear bearings!

              Comment


              • #8
                As mentioned by others, removing the hubs for brake service is a relatively minor inconvenience if the correct tool$$ are used.
                Especially compared to the ever present slim but real and grave threat of axle breakage.

                When I get to see my Hawk's rear axles with out their hubs they will be subjected to wet method mag particle inspection, or at the very least dye pen inspection around the keyway, and the taper, paying special attention to a band at least 1/2" either side of where the hub ended when installed. That is where the fretting and 100% reversing bending stress is highest.

                The 100% reversing bending stress occurs every time the wheel rotates once going down the road. That is something like 8 million full loaded reversing stress cycles every 10, 000 miles.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by jcharlestc View Post
                  But that doesn't address the issue of servicing the brakes on later models. . . . . based on the nightmarish experience I had with a '53 Commander when attempting to do a simple (!) brake job on the rear brakes (nightmarish, as in 'ruined axle'
                  It would seem we're getting tangled up with "servicing the brakes" when you are actually referring to a difficulty you had pulling the drums and hubs off the rear tapered axles.
                  1. Do you have a Studebaker Shop Manual?
                  2. Do you have the tool shown to pull the hubs and drums?


                  Originally posted by jcharlestc View Post
                  I don't understand the "...hardly any of them and at the very end of production", either.
                  Does this imply that I would have as hard a time doing a brake job on a '63 Avanti as on my '53 Commander?

                  Please help. Many thanks.
                  But yes, all Studebakers, including the Avanti, up to 1965, had tapered axles. Millions of the Dana rears with tapered axles were used on a dozen different makes of cars and trucks, so it's not a Studebaker thing, but used on most everything in the 1940s-1960s.

                  jack vines

                  PackardV8

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Studebaker bought components from Vendors.
                    Dana was a long standing supplier to Studebaker (and many, many others).
                    The tapered axle differential was inexpensive to manufacture and to quote customers like Studebaker.
                    Studebaker was interested in the warranty period. Brakes and bearing lube didn't really enter into that equation.

                    Originally posted by Hawklover View Post
                    Not to hijack this thread.............but concerning the rear axles, why in the world would Studebaker use a rear end that required the rear axles be removed to pack the rear bearings? Most cars just relie on the hypoid oil to treat the bearings.
                    HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

                    Jeff


                    Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



                    Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The earlier Dana 44s had plugs where grease fittings could be inserted to lube the wheel bearings.

                      JT

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I stopped using tapered axles on my 1957 after I got a set of flanged axles from Fairborn Studebaker. The left axle broke in December in the middle of rush hour without warning. I was lucky that there was no sheet metal damage.

                        Bob Miles
                        If I have to do a brake job, it's a snap now

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I've seen at least one '70s Avanti II that had tapered axles. It just shows they used whatever was available or next in line from the parts area.
                          Poet...Mystic...Soldier of Fortune. As always...self-absorbed, adversarial, cocky and in general a malcontent.

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                          • #14
                            If you're really worried, get the Fairborn Axles.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              The Fairborn axles are the way to go. I think I saw somewhere that they where made by Mosser.

                              Comment


                              • 6hk71400
                                6hk71400 commented
                                Editing a comment
                                Yes they are. I don't know why my axle broke, I was just starting from a green light when it went. I have heard scary stories from Studebaker owners. I did see a CJ 5 with a left broken axle on our Tucson Interstate 10 connection.
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