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Two minor questions...one radiator, one fan.

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  • Two minor questions...one radiator, one fan.

    In regards to my 63 Lark, Quick question. I have a very small leak in my radiator fill neck, right where the neck attaches to the top of the radiator. it just bubbles a little, almost not at all, when it is warmed up. At first I thought I would leave it, but it has successfully eaten away the paint below it. Could the leak be from using the wrong anti-freeze? I know all of the threads that have been posted about anti-freeze, and I am not trying to rehash that. Just was curious.

    Also, I know most of the colors on my car are not original. But I was wondering, my radiator fan is painted red...is that factory? (I won't change it either way, just curious)

    BTW to those who helped me with advice in regards to my distributor rebuild, thanks! I rebuilt the Prestolite and it is running better than it ever has!

    [IMG]

  • #2
    sounds like it just needs to be resoldered, worst case you need a new neck. an old school rad shop could likely fix you up for cheap

    If the fan is reddish-orange (matching the oil filler caps) that is probably factory. A lot of them get painted Chevy Orange but the real color tends more towards red.

    nate

    --
    55 Commander Starlight
    http://members.cox.net/njnagel
    --
    55 Commander Starlight
    http://members.cox.net/njnagel

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    • #3
      Whatever you do, don't let some CASO talk you into using J-B Weld on your radiator.(Pssst....it's black so you wouldn't even have to paint over it LOL.)

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      • #4
        quote:Originally posted by rusty65

        Whatever you do, don't let some CASO talk you into using J-B Weld on your radiator.(Pssst....it's black so you wouldn't even have to paint over it LOL.)
        I had actually seriously considered that!![:0]



        1963 Lark, waiting for spring...

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        • #5
          Well, you didn't hear it from me (actually you did[:I]), but my co-worker used this on his '66 GTO and the repair is still holding after four years.This car is only driven in warm weather.Recently he J-B Welded the radiator on his daily driver Geo Prisim.The leak was a whole lot larger so he used the high-tech hound dog method.[}]He drained the radiator and made sure it was bone dry.He then laid a bead of JBW over the affected area.He then waited 24 hours and repeated the process.That was two months ago and it's still holding!Mind you, he has a daily commute of about 60 miles so it gets 'stress tested' daily!![:0]Remember, you didn't hear this from me!.........Seriously,I can't recommend this in good faith;I'm just passing along what my buddy/co-worker did.I certianly don't want the Studebaker Gods to smite me,or worse yet have the hall monitor try to 'educate' me on proper radiator repair methods![B)]Take this suggestion with a grain of salt (and a six pack of beer!)[]

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          • #6
            If it was mine I'd shine the area up and solder it, in place, in the car. The repair would take maybe 30 seconds. Takes a lot longer to assemble the tools than it does to do it.

            You should be able to find somebody who will nose it up to a garage door and touch that up for you while you wait. Very small and simple repair- easier to do right than cobble!

            Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
            Parish, central NY 13131

            "Some people live for the rules, I live for exceptions"- 311

            "Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"



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            • #7
              Thanks guys! My father has a soldering gun. I will probably go that route after he gets back from his vacation in Florida. (lucky stiff!!)



              1963 Lark, waiting for spring...

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              • #8
                A soldering gun (as in electric type you solder wires together) won't do the job. You'll need a small propane torch. As Bams said, shiney up the area, use flux, and the correct type of solder. Hope this helps.

                Dan Miller
                Atlanta, GA

                [img=left]http://static.flickr.com/57/228744729_7aff5f0118_m.jpg[/img=left]
                Road Racers turn left AND right.

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                • #9
                  I've seen some pretty beefy (several hundred watt) soldering irons for this kind of work, but I agree, unless you have one, you need a torch.

                  nate

                  --
                  55 Commander Starlight
                  http://members.cox.net/njnagel
                  --
                  55 Commander Starlight
                  http://members.cox.net/njnagel

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                  • #10
                    Ahhh...my ignorance shows again... Thanks!!



                    1963 Lark, waiting for spring...

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