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R-1 parts & compression advice needed

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  • R-1 parts & compression advice needed

    As part of my cars restoration I'm having the engine looked at while thge seals are being redone. In an earlier post I received the advice that since the engine is out an overhaul wouldn't be imprudent.

    The engine rebuilder (recommended by a SDC member & shop owner who had his 289 rebuilt by the guy) I'm working with said in light of today's unleaded gas, that I consider possibly [u]lowering</u> the compression ratio down to 9.5. He said it would help the engine in the long run...but he also said that if the basic design is strong enough, it may not be necessary.
    I've never heard/read of it being necessary in a R-1, but I thought I'd ask for your considered opinions.

    Also, can anyone recommend vendors who sells R-1 rebuild kits...
    Also, it looks like a need a new harmonic balancer...any suggestions for that?

    63 Avanti R1 2788
    1914 Stutz Bearcat
    (George Barris replica)

    Washington State
    63 Avanti R1 2788
    1914 Stutz Bearcat
    (George Barris replica)

    Washington State

  • #2
    Lional Stone and other vendors have the balancer for $225 and as long as you run 91 or 92 octane fuel you should have no troubles with the 10.0 to 1 compression.

    Comment


    • #3
      quote:as long as you run 91 or 92 octane fuel you should have no troubles with the 10.0 to 1 compression.
      if you are an experienced Stude V8 tuner like Alan.

      Build for the worst possible condition. Try holding 70MPH pulling up the grade out of LA on a 100-degree day with the AC running - 91-octane won't keep it from pinging like a poltergeist. If you re-bore, definitely consider dropping the compression to the 9/9.5-1 range. There are semi-dished pistons specially for this and the cost is the same as flat tops.

      thnx, jack vines

      PackardV8
      PackardV8

      Comment


      • #4
        quote:Originally posted by JBOYLE

        As part of my cars restoration I'm having the engine looked at while thge seals are being redone. In an earlier post I received the advice that since the engine is out an overhaul wouldn't be imprudent.
        The engine rebuilder (recommended by a SDC member & shop owner who had his 289 rebuilt by the guy) I'm working with said in light of today's unleaded gas, that I consider possibly [u]lowering</u> the compression ratio down to 9.5. He said it would help the engine in the long run...but he also said that if the basic design is strong enough, it may not be necessary.
        I've never heard/read of it being necessary in a R-1, but I thought I'd ask for your considered opinions.
        Also, can anyone recommend vendors who sells R-1 rebuild kits...
        Also, it looks like a need a new harmonic balancer...any suggestions for that?
        When my '64 R-2 Avanti broke a piston and had to be rebored, Ted Harbit said flat tops would raise the compression too much with a rebore to .060. So, I went with cupped pistons and was very happy with the results. I drove our 6,000-mile Route 66 Trip using RUL. Unless I really got on it I never had any pinging. With a R-1 with slightly lower compression I think the cupped (semi-dished) pistons would be very satisfactoy using premium unleaded.
        I have alway dealt with Jon Myer or Ted Harbit on Avanti stuff. I think Phil Harris (Fairborn) would be a good source since he took over Ted's parts business. I have never dealt with them, but you have several very good vendors right in your state that could probably help you.

        Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia
        '53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
        '64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
        '64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
        Museum R-4 engine
        1962 Gravely Model L (Studebaker-Packard serial plate)
        1972 Gravely Model 430 (Studebaker name plate, Studebaker Onan engine)
        Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
        '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

        Comment


        • #5
          John, for today's gas, you have two choices: the shallow Dish Pistons as Paul & Jack said, or a set of low Compression Truck heads with stock flat top pistons (your's may be fine if Cyl. wear is slight) as used on the R2 to achieve 9 to 9.5 to 1.

          On an R Series Engine, I would also recommend the (unleaded fuel) Hard Valve seats.

          We have the parts to overhaul or rebuild the Engine.


          StudeRich at Studebakers Northwest -Ferndale,WA
          StudeRich
          Second Generation Stude Driver,
          Proud '54 Starliner Owner

          Comment


          • #6
            quote: On an R Series Engine, I would also recommend the (unleaded fuel) Hard Valve seats.
            That's a given...makes good sense for unleaded fuel.
            The English classic car magazine I read always make a big deal about making the switch. I've wondered why American magazines and forums don't promote it as much...probably because they assume everyone knows.

            Thanks for the advice. I'll be in touch for parts prices...I'll be sure and ask for the SDC Forum discount!

            63 Avanti R1 2788
            1914 Stutz Bearcat
            (George Barris replica)

            Washington State
            63 Avanti R1 2788
            1914 Stutz Bearcat
            (George Barris replica)

            Washington State

            Comment


            • #7
              I have an original unrestored 63 R1 still running the Carter AFB and dual point distributor and I can testify to the fact that she will ping on today's premium gasoline. Seven to three years ago I could buy 93 octane here in Oklahoma, but most companies are only selling 91 as premium now a days. And on 91, pinging happens anytime you romp on it or try and clmb a steep grade.

              At a minimum change valve seats & valves to a metal alloy designed for unleaded fuels. Perhaps others will know, but maybe an Edelbrock AFB and electronic distributor might help enough to get by on 91 octane.

              <div align="left">John</div id="left">

              <div align="left">'63 Avanti, R1, Auto, AC, PW (unrestored)</div id="left">
              sigpic
              John
              63R-2386
              Resto-Mod by Michael Myer

              Comment


              • #8
                quote:but maybe an Edelbrock AFB and electronic distributor might help enough to get by on 91 octane.
                An Edelbrock is just a shiny AFB and the electronic distributor doesn't change the timing. On 91-octane, on a hot day, under a hard pull, an R1 will ping, period.

                thnx, jack vines

                PackardV8
                PackardV8

                Comment


                • #9
                  quote:Originally posted by okc63avanti
                  And on 91, pinging happens anytime you romp on it or try and clmb a steep grade.

                  John,

                  The "pinging" isn't just annoying...it's destroying your engine. I would take the initial advance back a few degrees at a time until you no longer have any pinging under any conditions. You will loose some performance, but it is better than holes in the pistons.

                  Dick Steinkamp
                  Bellingham, WA

                  [IMG][/IMG]

                  Dick Steinkamp
                  Bellingham, WA

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    One other thing to consider is mixture with open throttle. Richer mixture at low vacuum can help a lot with detonation. Especially if
                    your a little lean to begin with.

                    Comment

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