Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Tow rigs

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Tow rigs

    I am planning the purchase of a second Studebaker, looking at a '64 Cruiser in great shape. Problem is, I can't drive it AND my '57 Commander at the same time to get them to a show!
    The '57 is a 259 w/od.
    The '64 is 289 w/auto.
    My thought is the Commander should handle a light two axle car trailer with electric brakes, maybe with an equalizing hitch. The '64 might be ok, but I believe it's a few pounds lighter and the automatic trans might need extra cooling (at best) or a rebuild for reliability. Works fine now, but towing stresses a transmission.

    My dream rig would be a three car gooseneck behind a 2 ton Transtar Diesel! (Want to add a '56 Hawk one day!)
    Any thoughts?

    Charles Eck
    Essex, MD

    '57 Commander 4 door sedan, 'Bluebird'
    '66 Ford F-250
    '53 John Deere 50

    Studebakers were made to drive! (Besides, they don't get lost as easy in the Wal-Mart parking lot!)

  • #2
    quote:Originally posted by mausersmth

    I am planning the purchase of a second Studebaker, looking at a '64 Cruiser in great shape. Problem is, I can't drive it AND my '57 Commander at the same time to get them to a show!
    The '57 is a 259 w/od.
    The '64 is 289 w/auto.
    My thought is the Commander should handle a light two axle car trailer with electric brakes, maybe with an equalizing hitch. The '64 might be ok, but I believe it's a few pounds lighter and the automatic trans might need extra cooling (at best) or a rebuild for reliability. Works fine now, but towing stresses a transmission.
    My dream rig would be a three car gooseneck behind a 2 ton Transtar Diesel! (Want to add a '56 Hawk one day!)
    Any thoughts?
    Most people in the RV towing business would say that your wheelbase is too short to be towing with the Cruiser (and probably the '57). Keep in mind that even a light car trailer is going to weigh at least 1,000 pounds and any Studebaker you put on a trailer is AT LEAST 3,000 pounds, but probably more (my '64 Daytona Wagonaire weighs over 3800 pounds with no one in the car). So, realistically you will probably be pulling at least 5,000 pounds and you need to consider the tow vehicle contents in your overall load. I'm not sure that a Flightomatic could handle that much. Since they are air cooled I don't know how you would add auxiliary cooling. Regarding pulling that load with your overdrive 259, I can pretty much guarentee that you will get stopped on an upgrade and you will smoke your clutch trying to start up again. I bought an 18-foot travel trailer in 1970 and had my Wagonaire equipped to pull it (259 w/overdrive and 3.73 TT rear, HD springs and shocks). Coincidentally, the trailer also weighed 3,800 pounds with a normal load (but no AC). I had a load equalizing hitch and I still had a BUNCH of white knuckle moments pulling it. So, I bought a long-bed '64 Champ with Powershift and a 3.73 TT rear. I put a R-1 engine in it before I ever tried pulling the trailer and I put an auxiliary air cooler in the tranny lines in series with the water cooling radiator. It handled the travel trailer very well (San Francisco to Seattle to Boston- no problems even with going up to 9,000 feet in Wyoming. I have gotten a lot more conservative in my old age so now I wouldn't pull any two-axle trailer with less than my long-bed Dodge Ram 2500.
    Certainly a gooseneck would be great- much more stable than a pull-behind. Good luck finding a two diesel.

    Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia
    '53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
    '64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
    '64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
    Museum R-4 engine
    1962 Gravely Model L (Studebaker-Packard serial plate)
    1972 Gravely Model 430 (Studebaker name plate, Studebaker Onan engine)
    Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
    '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

    Comment


    • #3
      Getting the second Stude to the show is what family and friend are for. Not good science to consider hauling, starting and stopping that kind of load with Studebaker passenger car suspension, clutch and brakes. Besides the damage to the Studes, it would be a danger to anyone on the road. Please don't do it.

      thnx, jack vines

      PackardV8
      PackardV8

      Comment


      • #4
        Guess you're right about one car towing the other. Don't want to flat tow because of the poor braking. Local I can use one of my pick-ups, ('66 F*rd F-100 & F-250) but they're the wrong make to drive to a show!
        Hmmm... Friends and relatives... My girlfriend's daughter and niece will have their license by the time the Commander is ready... Two cars, they can't complain about my music... Meets ARE family events!

        One day I want a Stude truck and a three car 'wedge' trailer. How big would the truck need to be?

        Charles Eck
        Essex, MD

        '57 Commander 4 door sedan, 'Bluebird'
        '66 Ford F-250
        '53 John Deere 50

        Studebakers were made to drive! (Besides, they don't get lost as easy in the Wal-Mart parking lot!)

        Comment


        • #5
          Hi, Charles,

          Glad you get it. One other point for anyone considering flat-towing a Stude
          quote: Don't want to flat tow because of the poor braking.
          Most Stude front suspensions have negative caster. This can cause the front wheels not to follow the tow car. The front wheels may wander, fail to return to center after a turn or develop a terrible shimmy. If you have to flat-tow for a short distance, have someone in the driver's seat.

          thnx, jack vines

          PackardV8
          PackardV8

          Comment

          Working...
          X