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Powering overdrive solenoid after 12V conversion?

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  • Tipjar
    replied
    Originally posted by gordr View Post
    I know Rich didn't mean to say that, but the governor is definitely needed. It is the actual brains of the overdrive. Usually all they need is a little burnishing of the contacts, which are easy to reach. The contacts are part of the cover, which comes off easily, with no small spring-loaded parts under it waiting to fly out.

    I'd say the grounding contact to trigger the relay is the simple way to do it. An ungrounded switch in the governor would have to pass the full current of the solenoid pull-in coil, which is considerable. If the contacts in the governor degraded, you could get incomplete solenoid strokes, which might make parts break.
    Thank you, Gord. Good information. I'll share it with the gentleman who helps me mechanically. He's in his seventies and very knowledgeable about older cars but these additional details are helpful.

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  • gordr
    replied
    I know Rich didn't mean to say that, but the governor is definitely needed. It is the actual brains of the overdrive. Usually all they need is a little burnishing of the contacts, which are easy to reach. The contacts are part of the cover, which comes off easily, with no small spring-loaded parts under it waiting to fly out.

    I'd say the grounding contact to trigger the relay is the simple way to do it. An ungrounded switch in the governor would have to pass the full current of the solenoid pull-in coil, which is considerable. If the contacts in the governor degraded, you could get incomplete solenoid strokes, which might make parts break.

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  • Corbinstein0
    replied
    The Governor may just need cleaning of the contacts, if you have trouble with it. I've always thought that if I could modify the Governor to be a switch instead of grounding, I might could eliminate the relay and simplify things.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tipjar
    replied
    Originally posted by StudeRich View Post
    The small box 731-16 is the Reverse Lockout Switch that was eliminated on later Cars as not needed overkill.
    The 731-27 is the Governor that Grounds the Solenoid at Speed, BOTH are not Voltage Sensitive, and also if they are there, probably Not needed.
    Thank you, StudeRich.

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  • StudeRich
    replied
    The small box 731-16 is the Reverse Lockout Switch that was eliminated on later Cars as not needed overkill.
    The 731-27 is the Governor that Grounds the Solenoid at Speed, BOTH are not Voltage Sensitive, and also if they ARE there, (New Ones are) probably Not needed.

    UPDATE: to clarify, depending on just how that was read and understood, it could read wrong.
    Thanks Gordy!
    Last edited by StudeRich; 09-14-2021, 07:12 PM.

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  • Tipjar
    replied
    Just about to order the solenoid (0731-1) and relay (0731-19) when I noticed the governor (0731-27) and switch (0731-16). See red arrows. Will those need updating too?


    Click image for larger version

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  • Tipjar
    replied
    Originally posted by StudeRich View Post
    Did anyone mention to you that for New Replacement and NOS Studebaker Parts the PLACE to go is:

    https://studebakervendors.com

    New Solenoids are under $200.00 if you Shop at the RIGHT Place!
    Holy crap. Thank you.

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  • Tipjar
    replied
    Originally posted by StudeRich View Post
    That HAS to be Non-Studebaker Overdrive Information if it is even true!
    It looks like you're correct. The book lists the the same part number for all body styles of that year (I should have checked before posting). And Stephen Allen's out of Florida just confirmed it....For anyone browsing this post with the same issue in the future, the original 6V OD solenoid part number is 521429 and I was just told the 12V replacement part number is 458502.

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  • StudeRich
    replied
    That HAS to be Non-Studebaker Overdrive Information if it is even true!

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  • gordr
    replied
    I have never heard of overdrive solenoids being different for hardtops. convertibles, or station wagons. What possible reason could there be?

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  • StudeRich
    replied
    Did anyone mention to you that for New Replacement and NOS Studebaker Parts the PLACE to go is:

    https://studebakervendors.com

    New Solenoids are under $200.00 if you Shop at the RIGHT Place!

    Leave a comment:


  • Tipjar
    replied
    Thank you all for pointing me in the right direction. I see prices for the Borg Warner R10 12V solenoid ($385) and relay ($130) may partially explain why the previous owner never got around to it. And this brief article on Hemmings mentions the longer shaft solenoid on convertible models can be very difficult to find. I haven't removed mine yet to verify. I may have lucked out with Eurton Electric in L.A. who specializes in rebuilding anything with a coil and are familiar with converting to 12V, if so their estimate is $250-$325.

    Key passages from the article:
    "Many collector-car enthusiasts today, who convert their car to the more efficient 12-volt systems, also have a problem converting the overdrive because it is not as simple as adding a voltage reducer to a 6-volt unit. The original windings in a 6-volt overdrive solenoid were made in two different sizes, a larger primary winding to activate the solenoid and smaller secondary windings to keep the solenoid engaged once it has been activated. A standard voltage reducer will not work in these applications."

    "The exceptions to these interchanges apply to convertibles, pickups and station wagons. Units for those types of vehicle are extremely difficult to find as they have a longer engagement shaft than a conventional hardtop or sedan unit and do not interchange."

    Last edited by Tipjar; 08-27-2021, 12:16 PM.

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  • Corbinstein0
    replied
    Originally posted by Tipjar View Post

    Does that mean you still use the 6V relay as well?
    nope. relay AWOL

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  • StudeRich
    replied
    It is perfectly OK to Pull the lever Out to get Deceleration and save the Brakes at Below 35 MPH or so, and from any speed slowing down with compression helping you.

    BUT, DO NOT do that with the Car MOVING, it will damage the O.D. !

    After you get the Overdrive working properly and used to driving it, we can explain How that is done moving, but it's too early to worry about that at this time.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tipjar
    replied
    Originally posted by gordr View Post
    Does the car behave differently when the lockout knob is pulled out.
    I haven't tried that yet because I wasn't sure what kind of operation is allowable with it pulled out and I didn't want to risk damaging anything. And I haven't met with local club members yet (fortunately there's one in my area). I'll try it soon though. Other parts are currently out for reconditioning.

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