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Periodic "Stutter"

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  • #16
    Originally posted by 64LarkLover View Post
    This "stutter"-does it occur in dry weather or just rainy or wet roads? I had an older car that would begin to self-short with an upward splash of street water.
    Dry weather as I don't take it out on rainy days. The undercarriage is too pretty to dirty up.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Andy R. View Post
      This car cannot be fixed...the insurance company would total it...better sell it to me...JK.
      ^ All the above is great advice. Now that you've tried Heet, I'd follow bundling advice in post #7...worked for me!
      Ha! Why didn't I think of that?!?!

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Corbinstein0 View Post
        I had a similar problem that eventually figured it out for me. That little stupid wire from the "Pass thru" in the distributor to the points had rubbed a hole in the insulation and would arc. eventually it shut down on me in Murfreesboro traffic. Cost me some pushing and a tow truck.
        Excellent suggestion, and I will check it and see. Many thanks.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by rkapteyn View Post
          Your engine is cross firing.
          This happened a lot more with electronic ignition.
          This is not due to bad insulation on the plug wires but is induction from one wire to the next.
          Bundle #1 and #5 ignition wire together and #3 and 7 .
          The firing order for the Studebaker V8 is 1,8,4,3,6,5,7,2.
          You can see that $5 fires when #7 is in its compression stroke on the way up. Voltage induced by #5 ignition wire will fire #7 also if they are bundled together.
          When you separate #5 and #7 by bundling them as above this will not happen.
          A friend had a 1962 Hawk and was complaining that the engine would stumble and quit when he was at a stoplight.
          I rerouted his wires by bundling them as described above and it never happened again.
          On the 289 it was not uncommon that #7 piston had a hole blown out by this cross firing because the dished pistons had a much thinner top wall.
          This is induction that causes the problems and even if you have the best ignition wire set it will happen. Induction is what makes a transformer work.
          This is how my car's wires are paired. Turns out that I have a burned coil resistor, hence why the issue.

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          • #20
            Mystery is solved. The coil resistor was burned clean through and I've ordered a new one. Enjoy the picture!
            Attached Files

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            • #21
              Wow! how did that even run, unless it was making a little contact.
              One thing to be aware of, on a points ignition. Don't leave it on, unless the car is running. Burns up things that way.

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              • #22
                Those of us who drove Chrysler products back in "the day" usually carried a spare ballast resistor in the glove box. All it had to do was strand you somewhere just one time to teach you that lesson.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by rkapteyn View Post
                  Your engine is cross firing.
                  This happened a lot more with electronic ignition.
                  This is not due to bad insulation on the plug wires but is induction from one wire to the next.
                  Bundle #1 and #5 ignition wire together and #3 and 7 .
                  The firing order for the Studebaker V8 is 1,8,4,3,6,5,7,2.
                  You can see that $5 fires when #7 is in its compression stroke on the way up. Voltage induced by #5 ignition wire will fire #7 also if they are bundled together.
                  When you separate #5 and #7 by bundling them as above this will not happen.
                  A friend had a 1962 Hawk and was complaining that the engine would stumble and quit when he was at a stoplight.
                  I rerouted his wires by bundling them as described above and it never happened again.
                  On the 289 it was not uncommon that #7 piston had a hole blown out by this cross firing because the dished pistons had a much thinner top wall.
                  This is induction that causes the problems and even if you have the best ignition wire set it will happen. Induction is what makes a transformer work.
                  I don't think that cross firing between #5 and #7 will cause a shutter as described, your description is accurate but the only thing that could happen is detonation in #7. If #7 cross fired to #5 nothing would happen as its business is finished, however if #5 cross fired to #7 it could detonate that is why a piston could develop a hole in it but it wouldn't shutter. You would not hear anything out the exhaust except until there is a hole in the piston. There is no action from #5 and #7 would be firing prematurely and this would only manifest itself under load and there would be nothing at idle. If cross firing was happening you would clearly see it in the dark.

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                  • #24
                    Check your wiring diagram and see if that engine uses a pink resistor wire in lieu of a resistor.

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